Serengeti House

An exclusive Serengeti retreat for family & friends

Serengeti House

Grumeti, Tanzania

Set on the gentle slopes of Sasakwa Hill, this spacious sanctuary epitomises casual, carefree living in one of the continent’s most iconic settings.

Boasting endless views of the vast Serengeti plains as well as the nearby waterhole where game regularly gather to drink, this modern African home includes a 25-metre rim-flow flow, expansive outdoor dining decks and fire pit – ensuring continuous engagements with the wilderness.

A lifechanging retreat with loved ones

The villa’s four boldly proportioned guest suites – each with serene bathrooms, outdoor showers and private terraces – embody refined luxury underpinned by contemporary comfort, and this expansive property also includes an eat-in family kitchen, media room, fully-equipped fitness centre, tented massage treatment suite and tennis pavilion.

Flexible, tailormade itineraries

Set in the 350,000-acre Grumeti Reserve, this modern safari experience includes a full staff complement and private access to an untouched wilderness on the annual wildebeest migration route. 

Singita Travel Advisors

Our expert in-house travel service embodies the Singita experience every step of the way.

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Expert advice & guidance
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Personalised itineraries
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Tailored services

What to see and do at Serengeti House

Anti-poaching Observation Post Visit
Tennis
Game Drives
Community Visits
Wine Experiences
Guided Safari Walks
Wellness
Swimming Pool
For Families
Boutique & Gallery
Fitness Centre

Lodge Information

Conservation at Singita Serengeti

The Serengeti plains team with wildlife, including vast herds of plains game, a plethora of predators and the spectacle of the annual wildebeest migration.

As the custodian of more than 350,000 acres of the world-renowned Serengeti ecosystem in Tanzania – which is home to the Great Migration – the Grumeti Fund is responsible for the reintroduction and recovery of stable wildlife populations, while ensuring that neighbouring rural communities benefit tangibly from these natural areas.

Faced with challenges including uncontrolled illegal hunting, rampant wildfires and spreading strands of invasive alien vegetation when they took over the management of the area in 2003, the Fund dedicated itself to transform severely depleted wildlife numbers into thriving populations once more.

Restoring this once barren and highly degraded region to a flourishing wilderness, their successes include the remarkable recovery of many species – including buffalo, wildebeest and elephant populations, and in 2019, the Fund carried out the largest single relocation and reintroduction of 9 critically endangered Eastern Black Rhino.

The Trust also manages an onsite Environmental Education Centre for school teachers and children to immerse themselves in Outdoor Education and fieldwork, and a world-class culinary school.

Meet the team of Serengeti House

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Guest relationsGuidesKitchen
Adas Anthony Shemboko
Field Guide
Anthony Jacob Nyambacha
Field Guide
Benson Mboya
Field Guide
Bernard Hosea
Field Guide
Braya Masunga
Operation Manager
Calson Luka
Field Guide
Edward Ayo
Field Guide
Edward Sawe Kaaya
Head Guide
Francis Amos Gagiri
Field Guide
Gadmel S. Kimaro
Field Guide
George David Tolchard
Head Guide
Gerald Alexander Maliti
Field Guide
Godson Emanuel Nyiti
Field Guide
Grant Telfer
Field Guide
James Ikamba
Field Guide
Japhet Robert Mwenura
Field Guide
Jeremiah Morris
Field Guide
John Ngowi
Field Guide
Joseph Kibwe
Field Guide
Medard Fundi
Field Guide
Mishi Danstan Mtili
Field Guide
Nicodemus Temu
Field Guide
Peter Chatama
Field Guide
Peterlis Kibwana
Field Guide
Robert Kibwana
Field Guide
Stephen Wambura Chacha
Field Guide
Stuart Levine
Field Guide
Anicet Philip Maro
Field Guide
Anthony Webiro
Relief Sous Chef

“Beneath a wooden roof, a stage of day beds and a huge fire pit drops down to reveal the star turn - the view of the seemingly unending savannah, framed by an infinity pool that overlooks a nearby watering hole where zebras and elephants come to drink.”

– Tatler