July 2022
Experience
Lodges and Camps

Experience the ebb and flow of the life-giving Sand River

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Experience the ebb and flow of the life-giving Sand River

Rivers create and support life. Perennial and yet ever-changing with the revolving seasons, their presence or indeed absence determines how lush the landscape is, and in turn, how abundant the food sources and how prolific the game.

In South Africa’s vast Sabi Sand wilderness, the Sand River is a hub around which much of the action centres. The Sand – or Manyeleti – flows south-eastwards through this exclusive and private reserve for 50 km, eventually joining the Sabie River in the Kruger National Park.

Thick riverine vegetation flanks this watercourse, and sandy beaches and dramatic rock formations which have evolved and morphed over centuries are dotted along its winding route, creating a uniquely varied environment. This is perfectly adapted to host a plethora of species, big and small, aquatic or land-loving.

WATCH The Sand River's ability to support a wide variety of species makes this reserve a rich game-viewing destination

Home to an incredible diversity

Hippos in sun-drenched shallow pools, crab-hunting otters, wallowing crocs and wading elephants are all drawn to the water to feed, drink or cool down – as is the abundance of birdlife that make their homes in its oasis-like orbit.

The seasons – which come with changeable rainfall and weather patterns – dictate how high or low the river is at any given time. During the rainy season, it’s known to swell to impressive proportions, and is able to support the impressive numbers of big game that this reserve is renowned for.

For guests to Singita’s lodges, this makes for a rich wildlife-viewing experience – an opportunity to witness a day in the wilderness at its most serene and the daily rituals that sustain life. So, whether you sit in the late-afternoon light and enjoy a procession of elephants coming to drink, or soak in the sounds with the reflection on the water to accompany your sundowner, the river is both a symbolic and scenic centrepoint for the cycles and seasons of the bush.

Whether for active game viewing, or leisurely sundowners, the river edges serve as a scenic spot to stop during the course of your drive

Watching the world flow by

Singita Boulders and Ebony Lodges are two of the three properties located in Singita Sabi Sand, which in turn is situated within the Sabi Sand Nature Reserve, a privately owned reserve and well-protected and pristine stretch of wilderness. Singita Sabi Sand is also home to the first-ever Singita property (Ebony was built in 1993 and was Singita’s first lodge), and as such holds much history and significance.

Both Boulders and Ebony are set right on the river, and have been built to celebrate their surroundings. Each honours the landscape uniquely through its design, and allows guests to experience the surrounds in full technicolour while being close to the water at all times.

Both Ebony and Boulders Lodges benefit from their peaceful proximity to the Sand River, and all the sensory joys it provides

Shaded by the lush trees, and yet ideally positioned to enjoy beautiful vantage points of the river as it rushes or gently flows by – depending on the season – the communal dining and bar spaces are perfect for game viewing, offering comfortable spaces from where to marvel at wildlife while enjoying a morning coffee or leisurely lunch.

Featuring idyllic vistas of treelines, landscapes and impossibly beautiful skylines from every suite, both Ebony and Boulders Lodges ensure a continuous sense of peace that contributes to this all-encompassing sensory experience – mirroring the soothing tone of each riverine setting.

The remarkable terrain surrounding this life-giving river makes a visit to this reserve a tranquil and rewarding experience

Explore the magic of the Sabi Sand

To learn more about our magnificent properties in this special part of South Africa, click here >

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