The Singita Blog

First-Time Safari

October 29, 2015 - Experience

There are few things more memorable than one’s first visit to the bush – the sights and sounds never leave you and often spark a life-long love affair with the African wilderness. This is true even for those of us who were born and grew up here, and such is the case with Gugu Sithole, Singita’s PR co-ordinator. What follows is her account of her first safari; a trip to Singita’s lodges in South Africa:

First time safari at Singita Sabi Sand

For most of us, on a scale of 1 – 10, an African safari is right up there! And if not, I’m pretty sure it features somewhere on your bucket list. To be one with nature, to reach out and touch the wild, to taste and feel it, where the roar of it fills your very being with the sound of life. From the sands of the Serengeti to the remote and lush scenery of the bushveld, it’s a stir that lives within all of us. For both the first-time safari-goer and the more seasoned game viewer, there is something magical that awaits.

Singita Ebony Lodge at Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa

Singita Ebony Lodge at Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa

The game viewing begins before you even touch down on the airstrip, as you spot wildlife from the sky. After a quick refreshment, you are whisked away to the lodge where every wish and whim is attended to. The first glance around your suite reveals accommodation beyond any expectation, leaving you feeling like life simply can’t get any better. And then, it does… because all that other stuff is just the beginning.

First time safari at Singita Sabi Sand

Up close and personal game drives allow you to experience some of the world’s most beautiful creatures in their natural habitat – leopards cleverly camouflaged in tall grass, lions roaring as a reminder of who’s more fierce, herds of elephants chomping away at tree bark. At night you might even spot a spotted genet (see what I did there?).

First time safari at Singita Sabi Sand

There’s nothing quite like the bond you form with your guide and tracker. You’ll think of them often when you’ve returned home. Somehow, they manage to fill you with a sense of ease in this unfamiliar setting. They’re always right on hand to ensure you miss nothing, pointing out all the hidden gems, and adding that extra bit of magic to an already unforgettable trip.

Singita Sweni Lodge at Singita Kruger National Park, South Africa

Singita Sweni Lodge at Singita Kruger National Park, South Africa

Even your culinary experience will leave you wondering why it took you so long to visit. Morning and afternoon game drive bush-stops feature delectable snacks prepared in the Singita kitchens, as well as the finest liqueur coffees, G&Ts, wines and champagnes. In fact, with seven specially designed eating moments throughout the day, including the guidance of charming sommeliers to ensure that perfect pairing, you may be forgiven for never wanting to leave. For those with a palate requiring a little bit of extra attention, fully customised menus are simply a request away.

First time safari at Singita Sabi Sand

And for the final encore, just before the curtain sets on your remarkable adventure – as you arrive back from yet another spectacular game drive, sun-kissed and filled with the joys of this world – you’re taken away to an amazing lantern-lit food and wine experience on the airstrip, featuring the finest dishes prepared by Singita’s executive chef and paired with exquisite wines. You soak up the final hours sitting under the heavens, gazing up at the beauty of a million stars and listening to the symphony of Africa’s wildlife just beyond you in the dark.

First time safari at Singita Sabi Sand

Singita Kruger National Park and Singita Sabi Sand, home to five of our lodges, together comprise 78,000 acres of South Africa’s most incredible and pristine land. Both concessions are renowned for high concentrations of big game, frequent leopard sightings and large prides of lion. Please contact our Reservations team to find out more about experiencing this carefully protected part of South Africa.

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Big Cat Country: The Leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

October 21, 2015 - Experience, Sabi Sand, Wildlife

“You can lie out on the bare ground and look like a heap of pebbles. You can lie out on the naked rocks and look like a piece of pudding-stone. You can lie out on a leafy branch and look like sunshine sifting through the leaves; and you can lie right across the centre of a path and look like nothing in particular. Think of that and purr!”

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

This excerpt from Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories is a perfect explanation as to why it can be tricky to spot a leopard while in the bush. They are elusive creatures, but the Sabi Sand Reserve, in which Singita has a 45,000-acre concession, is very well known for its leopard activity. These cats form an important part of the diversity in the area, with Singita guides and trackers becoming familiar with various resident leopards that have established territory near the Sand River.

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

The Ravenscourt male

Females are more common, as adult males venture beyond the local area in order to establish new territories for themselves. There is however one male leopard of some significance, who was orphaned by a “rogue” male two years ago. His mother was the fondly-remembered Ravenscourt female; an incredibly beautiful leopardess who was a familiar sight for visitors to Singita Sabi Sand. Her cub subsequently became independent and moved south, while the “rogue” male has settled in the area and is known as the Nyeleti male leopard; a name that means ‘stars’ in Shangaan.

Singita Ebony Lodge

Singita Ebony Lodge

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

Hlaba’Nkunzi female and her cub

Since losing the Ravenscourt female, Hlaba’Nkunzi, a new female leopard from the western Sabi Sand has taken over her territory and given birth to two litters of cubs. She is an unusually adventurous leopard, and is regularly spotted close to the lodges during the early morning and evening. She even gave birth to her most recent litter under the private pool deck of one of Singita Ebony Lodge‘s suites.

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

Hlaba’Nkunzi’s young male cub

Over the last 10 months, we have been fortunate enough to observe one of these cubs grow up and adopt some of his mother’s habits, including a quiet tolerance of the game vehicles and a sense of comfort around the lodges. This young male is always a popular character to spot during a game drive, and reminds both guests and staff alike how fortunate we are to be in such close proximity to these incredible animals.

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

This article is the first in a series of wildlife stories that will showcase the interesting animals found across the five regions in which Singita’s lodges and camps are located. Please subscribe to the blog using the form on the right to ensure that you don’t miss the next one!

You can read more about the Ravenscourt female in this heart-wrenching tribute written by Head Guide, Mark Broodryk, and also see some gorgeous photographs of the first sighting of the Hlaba’Nkunzi cubs.

Special thanks to Ross Couper for the lovely photographs.

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Summer Salads at Singita Castleton

October 19, 2015 - Cuisine, Singita Castleton

Castleton salads

As summer approaches in the Sabi Sand, evenings are longer and days are lazier and warmer, the weather is perfect for salads and al fresco eating.  Long afternoon lunches are best enjoyed at Singita Castleton, where the farm table under the fig tree is laid with a sumptuous spread of tapenades, chilled soups, homemade breads, and fresh salads.  Follow up lunch with a swim – refreshed before heading out on a late afternoon game drive.  Our chefs at Singita Castleton shared this summer recipe so you can bring a taste of Singita’s early summer into your kitchen!

Asian Style Caprese Salad (2)


Salad ingredients

3 ripe beef tomatoes sliced
4 green tomatoes sliced and quartered
200g (1 cup) yellow cherry tomatoes
200g (1 cup) red cherry tomatoes
1 ball of buffalo mozzarella
10 basil leaves
10 basil flowers – optional
2 Tbsp mixed sesame seeds

Dressing ingredients

100ml raspberry vinegar
50g white sugar
100g extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper

For the dressing

Make the dressing first as the tomatoes will need to be marinated for at least 30 minutes before serving.  In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients together and whisk until well blended. Marinate the tomatoes.

Putting it all together

Arrange the varieties of tomatoes onto a plate with torn pieces of mozzarella and Thai basil and flowers for garnish. Sprinkle the sesame seeds over the top of the salad and use some left over dressing to drizzle onto the salad before serving.


Singita Castelton (game drive)-1-41

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Wrapping up the Bush Tales

October 16, 2015 - Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, Singita Pamushana Lodge

Richard and Sarah Madden are freelance travel writers and filmmakers who have spent the last few months documenting life in and around Singita Pamushana Lodge in Zimbabwe. Their series of short films from the region is entitled “Bush Tales” and explores Singita’s community development, ecotourism and conservation work in Southern Africa. In this, their last report, they reflect on their time in the Malilangwe Reserve and the wonderful wildlife memories they made there:

Of all the bush environments we have encountered over the last couple of years reporting and filming for the UK Daily Telegraph, few can rival Singita Pamushana and the Malilangwe Reserve for the sheer beauty of the landscapes. This priceless asset meant that we were able to film and photograph the wildlife in the most beautiful surroundings imaginable.

Bush Tales from Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

We arrived towards the end of the wet season when the bush is still very lush. Traditionally this is when the game is more difficult to see and the waterholes are not yet the wildlife magnet they become later in the year when the bush is very dry. Every day we were rewarded with incredible sightings against a backdrop that defies superlatives.

Bush Tales from Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Sightings of the big cats always make the heart thump faster. One sighting we will never forget was the day towards the end of our stay when we watched a female cheetah playing with her soon-to-be-independent cub who had developed some unusual tree-climbing abilities and was keen to show them off for our benefit.

Bush Tales from Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

The hyena den just ten minutes from camp was also a guaranteed source of fun and games, especially at dawn and dusk when the hyena families were at their most active. And at a time when rhino poaching has reached epidemic proportions in other parts of Africa, it was an incredible privilege to find a rhino family so relaxed that we had a clear view at close quarters of the mother suckling her calf.

Bush Tales from Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

During our final week, we also spent time with Dr Bruce Clegg, the Malilangwe’s resident ecologist, as he and his team embarked on a leopard count. We filmed his team setting camera traps for these notoriously secretive animals and later identifying each individual from the intricate series of patterns on the side of their bodies. Bruce also runs courses for visiting groups from local schools who learn about the reserve’s delicate eco-system including everything from the health of the reserve’s lion prides to the fish in the Malilangwe Lake.

Bush Tales from Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

We will never forget our time at Singita Pamushana. The opportunity to document not only the wildlife itself but also the lives of the dedicated people who live and work here, as well as the surrounding communities who have such close ties to both, was a privilege indeed.


You can see Richard and Sarah’s other “Bush Tales” films here, or visit our Vimeo channel for more.

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A Gluten-Free Safari

October 09, 2015 - Cuisine, Experience

The flexibility and creativity of our kitchen teams is one of the many reasons that food plays such a big role in any visit to Singita’s lodges and camps. Understanding the preferences and special requirements of our guests is top priority, and often this includes unusual dietary restrictions such as a sensitivity to wheat or dairy. One such recent visitor to Singita Boulders Lodge in South Africa was Lindsay Zegans, otherwise known as NYC GlutenFree Grubber on Instagram. The chefs at the lodge designed an entirely gluten-free menu for the duration of Lindsay’s honeymoon safari, including seared tuna salad, celiac-friendly cheesecake and a bunless lamb burger.

Gluten free food at Singita

Here they share two of their gluten-free recipes with us; one is a wholesome bread loaf that uses alternatives to traditional wheat flour and the other is a vegetarian take on the traditional South African bobotie, made with butternut squash and chickpeas. Lindsay was also kind enough to contribute lots of her great photos – doesn’t it all look delicious!?

Gluten free food at Singita

Gluten-free bread baked at Singita Boulders Lodge


Ingredients – what you will need:

400g mixture of gluten-free flour (potato, rice, buckwheat and/or corn)
1 tsp. xanthan gum
1½ tbsp. instant yeast
2 tsp. salt
5 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. lemon juice
250ml warm water
2 eggs
1 cup yoghurt
2 tbsp. honey

Method – what to do:

1. Preheat oven to 180°C
2. In a mixing bowl, combine the flours, instant yeast and xanthan gum
3. Combine the rest of the ingredients together in a separate, large mixing bowl
4. Add the flour mixture to the liquids and mix with a dough hook until the consistency of batter is achieved
5. Transfer the dough into a lined, standard-size (roughly 9″ x 5″ x 3″) loaf tin
6. Prove dough in warm area until it doubles in volume
7. Bake for 25 minutes, depending on size of the loaf tin
8. Remove from tin and return to the oven for a further 10 minutes

Baker’s Tip: To check if your gluten-free bread is baked through, test the internal temperature of the loaf, which should be around 95°C/200°F.

Gluten free food at Singita


Ingredients – what you will need:

For the base mixture:
1 medium sized butternut, peeled and cut in to small cubes
150g dried chickpeas, soaked in water from night before (or tinned chickpeas)
3 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. olive oil
2 onions, chopped
2 heads of ginger, chopped
3 whole tomatoes, chopped
2ml crushed garlic
15ml curry powder
15ml turmeric
15ml cumin powder
10ml Mother-in-Law’s Tongue (red chilli powder)
Finely grated rind and juice of ½ small lemon
60 ml raisins

For the egg custard topping, combine:
500ml cream
4 eggs
4ml salt

Method – what to do:

1. Begin by frying the onions in the butter and oil over a medium heat
2. When the onions are translucent, add the ginger, garlic, lemon and spices
3. Cook briefly until fragrant
4. Add the tomatoes, butternut, chickpeas and raisins
5. Keep cooking the mixture over a medium heat until butternut is cooked al dente
6. Preheat the oven at 180°C
7. Using your desired casserole or baking dish, spoon in your bobotie mixture and level the top
8. Cover with the egg custard and bake until the custard is set

Vegetarian bobotie at Singita Boulders Lodge

Vegetarian and gluten-free bobotie

Traditional bobotie is a spiced mince dish of Cape Malay origin, usually served with yellow rice and condiments like raita, chutney and toasted nuts. In Lindsay’s own words, Nico’s vegetarian version is “amazing!”. Why not give it a try this weekend and share it with us on Instagram by tagging @Singita_? You can also follow @nycgrubber on Instagram for more of Lindsay’s yummy food photos.

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Quick & Quirky: Wildlife Snippets on our Vimeo Channel

October 08, 2015 - Environment, Experience, Wildlife

Have you ever seen an elephant blowing bubbles? Or a very lucky wildebeest escaping the clutches of an apex predator? Or a leopard cub getting a bath from his mother? Singita’s Vimeo channel is a gold mine for wildlife lovers, and is full of great sightings just like those described. Most of the wildlife posts are short snippets filmed by field guides out on game drives with guests, and many contain unusual or exciting animal behaviour.

Leopard at Singita Kruger National Park

Here are some highlights of the most amusing and eye-catching wildlife sightings you can find on our channel:

Lioness vs. Porcupine

Singita Kruger National Park is well known for the large lion prides and ever changing dynamics within the family groups. Over the last few months especially, we have been spoilt with terrific sightings of the prides as they move through the concession and especially the phenomenal array of cubs. This sighting however was completely unique and very entertaining! Two lionesses taking on a porcupine? That is very brave considering the damage that those quills can cause.

A Feast for the Shishangaan Pride

Three adult lionesses with seven cubs from the Shishangaan pride were seen on a few occasions this month. The cubs gorged themselves and could hardly walk to keep up as their mothers led them away from the kill sites after feeding, in order to keep them safe. We also saw a total of thirty-two Shishangaan pride members feeding on the remains of a Cape buffalo a few weeks ago!

Leopard Cub Having a Bath

Singita Sabi Sand is renowned for a healthy leopard population, where guests are treated to daily sightings of these majestic animals. Our guides cam upon this incredible sighting on morning game drive today.

Lucky Gnu (Singita Kruger National Park)

We were lucky enough to witness this gripping encounter between a lone wildebeest and a lioness. Through true determination and possibly a bit of luck this wildebeest managed to fight off the lioness and gallop to freedom. Rare sightings like these are such a privilege to see!

Baby Hippo Going for a Dip (Singita Kruger National Park)

Newly born hippos are relatively small, weighing from 55 to 120 pounds, and are fiercly protected by their mothers. Young hippos can only stay under water for about half a minute, but adults can stay submerged up to six minutes.

Elephants Blowing Bubbles (Singita Sabi Sand)

Anywhere on the concession where there is water, there are elephants. Mid-morning at the water source is generally the best, as the herds come down to drink. There are often very good interactions between the elephants and the crocodiles and hippos wishing to bask in the sun on the riverbanks.

Singita’s social channels are a great place to get the latest news from our 12 lodges and camps. You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and, of course, Vimeo.

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Conservation for Kids: Education Through Exploration

October 05, 2015 - Community Development, Conservation, Did You Know?, Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, Singita Pamushana Lodge, Sustainable Conservation

As part of its ongoing commitment to the surrounding communities, Singita Pamushana (Zimbabwe) partners with the Malilangwe Trust which runs regular courses in conservation education for pupils at local schools. The four-day courses are held at nearby Hakamela Camp for students in Grade 6 and 7 who come from eleven local schools.

Conservation education at Singita Pamushana

The courses are designed to teach students the value of conserving the environment and the wildlife for both their own future and that of their communities. The courses consist of classroom lessons at Hakamela, game drives in the reserve, and visits to the Malilangwe Dam to learn about aquatic conservation.

“Young people are the future,” says Tendai Nhunzwi, Director of Malilangwe’s Neighbour Outreach Program. “If we involve them in conservation at a tender age, it will help make wildlife and the environment sustainable. When they have been on these courses, the children become ambassadors to the local communities and we have seen some very positive results.”

Conservation education at Singita Pamushana

“Parents tell us that the children chide them when they are doing things wrong, whether it’s causing erosion through over-ploughing or cutting down trees. Poaching has also been reduced and the local communities have begun to report suspected poachers. The plays that the children create and then act out at the end of the course often show the dangers of poaching and why it so destructive.”

Shepherd Mawire, Projects Co-ordinator for the Malilangwe Trust and the man who designs and runs the Conservation Education programme, agrees. “The results are very positive,” say Shepherd. “When they come on the course, many of the children have never even used cutlery before so they have to learn quickly.”

Conservation education at Singita Pamushana

“We teach them about all aspects of the environment from explaining how wildlife is identified and categorised, the diets of the animals, to how all the creatures in the ecosystem depend on one another and what happens if the cycle of nature is disturbed.”

“The children understand how looking after the wildlife and the environment can benefit them in the long-term,” concludes Shepherd. “Singita Pamushana is a source of jobs for them and their families and the benefits are long-term. Even telling the children that they will not be able to go on the course if they have a bad attendance record has improved the present registers at the schools.”

Conservation education at Singita Pamushana

“And when we ask them at the end of each course what they would like to do when they grow up, it’s amazing to see how much their horizons have expanded from just a few days before. At the beginning most want to be teachers, nurses or to join the police which are the jobs they see around them every day. But by the end of the course, they realise that there are other options open to them and they want to be guides, game scouts or part of the research team. Their mind-set has already changed and they want to be part of a good thing that’s happening.”

Richard and Sarah Madden are freelance travel writers and filmmakers who were based in the Malilangwe Reserve at Singita Pamushana Lodge in Zimbabwe. Their series of short films from the region is entitled “Bush Tales” and explores Singita’s community development, ecotourism and conservation work in Southern Africa. 

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Singita opens new School of Cooking in the Serengeti

October 01, 2015 - Community Development, Cuisine, Singita Grumeti


After the success of its cooking school in the Kruger National Park, Singita has announced that it has opened a second school in the Serengeti, Tanzania. The Serengeti School of Cooking, which opened in July, promises to give students the best education in the art of food (and wine).

As the hospitality and tourism industries in Tanzania continue to grow, so too does the demand for qualified chefs. The aim of the cooking school is not only to bridge this widening gap, but also to promote cheffing as a highly skilled occupation that offers great prospects for employment.

Sabora Day 2

The course load will cover topics such as professional cookery, food production, catering, as well as communication skills, customer care and computer literacy. It will also offer practical training, with students getting the opportunity to put their knowledge to the test as members of the staff canteen and lodge kitchen teams.


Pioneering this exciting project is Singita Serengeti Executive Chef, Frank Louw, who has been with the company for nearly 10 years. “I’m eager to not only share my passion for food with the students, but do my bit to positively impact the lives of the communities within the Serengeti and surrounding Bunda districts”, Louw says. “I hope that what we’ve started here will make a real difference in the lives of the students and their families”.

Graduates from the Serengeti School of Cooking will gain a nationally recognised Professional Cookery qualification, after which they can commence work at a Commis Chef level within a Singita lodge kitchen, or any other lodge or hotel within Tanzania.

Singita Sasakwa Lodge, Tanzania

Singita Sasakwa Lodge, Tanzania

Along with environmental sustainability, the support and upliftment of local communities is a key part of Singita’s role in preserving the wilderness areas of which it is a guardian. Other projects at Singita Grumeti in Tanzania include an Environmental Education Centre, a scholarship fund for local students and small business development programmes that teach agricultural skills.

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Get to Know Us: Singita’s Female Field Guides

September 25, 2015 - Did You Know?, People of Singita, Wildlife

Singita’s success is built on the collective strength and vision of deeply committed people, all passionate about Africa and linked by a common purpose to protect and preserve the world’s last remaining wilderness areas through conservation, community development and hospitality. The highly-trained field guides at each of our 12 lodges are a critical part of the guest experience, and we are proud to employ a large number of women in this traditionally male-dominated role.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Three of these dynamic and passionate women can be found leading twice-daily game drives for guests at Singita Kruger National Park in South Africa. Chantelle Venter, Jani Lourens and Deirdre Opie are part of the team responsible for conducting unique guided safari experiences, whether on foot, by bike or in state-of-the-art Land Rovers.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Head Guide Deirdre loves to wow guests with “those once in a lifetime situations where you as a guide know that what you have just experienced is a unique and special moment, your excitement becomes infectious and the guests feel like they have really seen something extraordinary.” Growing up on a farm instilled a fierce love of animals in Deirdre, who volunteered at the Johannesburg Zoo during her school years, looking after the farmyard animals, birds and primates. She studied Nature Conservation at university and later completed a guiding course which allowed her to share her love and knowledge of the outdoors with others.

Singita Lebombo Lodge

Chantelle also fondly remembers growing up outdoors: “My childhood was spent running around, climbing and falling out of trees, riding horses, falling off skateboards and getting bloody noses in the karate class. I realised after two years in the corporate world that I was not cut out to sit behind a desk.” All three guides share a common distaste for traditional office jobs, preferring instead to be in the bush and far away from “high heels and pantyhose”! As Jani astutely remarks; “There is always something new to discover. Not only within nature but also within myself, one can learn so much by just observing what goes on around you. And that is what keeps the continuous inspiration burning.”

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Singita’s guiding experience is designed to be delivered with humility, professionalism and flexibility, with the end result being an educational experience for all. This attitude, along with an uncompromising sensitivity towards the environment, is embodied in all our field guides and trackers. Guests are often impressed by their ability to read the signs of nature, track animals and wield an enormous game vehicle across unforgiving terrain. Jani tends to make a big impression in this regard, as her diminutive size can be misleading. “I am not one of the tallest people out there and I sometimes have to elevate myself from the seat to check where I’m driving when off-road. I always get positive comments from guests after they experienced my mad 4×4 skills though!”

Singita_Mar 05 2015_0236

When asked about the most memorable moments in their time at Singita, all three guides have an interesting wildlife story to tell. For Deirdre it was a rare encounter with a pangolin, Jani got between a lioness and her cubs while on foot one day, and Chantelle was chased around the staff laundry building by a honey-badger! “This is the simple life where one does not need to own a lot of things because the environment around us is what makes us rich,” says Jani.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

They also have good advice for aspiring female field guides or any women following an unconventional career path. Chantelle believes that “you create your own opportunities. Aim to be the best so that nobody can question your ability. Never complain and always remain humble and compassionate. Start doing push-ups.” Deirdre says that focus is also important: “You have to decide where you want to go, how you are going to get there, and then stick to it. In careers that are unusual for women, you will have to work far harder and prove to be far more competent in order to be treated as an equal. I would like to think that by being one of a few female Head Guides it shows other women that with hard work and determination you can be a leader in any industry of your choice.”

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Please visit our website to find out about career opportunities at Singita, and learn more about the experience of working in a “place of miracles”.

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A Serengeti Safari Fondly Remembered

September 23, 2015 - Experience, Singita Grumeti, Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Singita Sasakwa Lodge, located in the Grumeti Reserves in northern Tanzania, is a slice of heaven, if we say so ourselves! The majestic views of the Serengeti from its position atop a hill and the old-world elegance of the nostalgic manor house decor make this lodge a true celebration of comfort and luxury. Ms. Anna Lord, a recent guest from Singapore who visited Singita Grumeti with her family, is in agreement: “It was an extraordinarily comfortable, indulgent but fun experience, in the hands of knowledgable and extremely hard-working professionals who do everything to ensure that you have a holiday that you will never forget.”

What follows are some of Anna’s memories of Singita Sasakwa Lodge, along with a selection of the stunning photographs she took during her stay with us:

Image copyright Anna Lord

“From the moment that we touched down on the wonderful Sasakwa airstrip, we knew that we were in good hands… Our bags were whisked off to our cottage and we were immediately immersed in the indescribable beauty of the Serengeti.”

Image copyright Anna Lord

“Frankly, if our Singita experience had ended after that [first] game drive, the trip would have been worthwhile.”

Image copyright Anna Lord

“No matter how many excellent documentaries you have seen, nothing prepares you for the incredible spectacle of the plains filled with long lines of wildebeest and their calves, with a few zebra and topi tagging along. The sight, sound and scent of the phenomenon as they crossed the river meant that I could tick a major box on my bucket list.”

Image copyright Anna Lord

“We were travelling with our 4 children (aged 4, 7, 10 & 12) and immediately knew that our accommodation was beyond perfect. Beautifully appointed, vast living and dining spaces (indoor & out), with four slightly different, tastefully designed bedrooms, each with stunning views and impeccable bathrooms with views that are to die for!”

Image copyright Anna Lord

“I apologise in advance for the excessive use of superlatives that you are likely to have to endure if you manage to persevere to the end of this, but it is almost impossible to do justice to this fabulous lodge and the wonderful team that runs it, using words. ”

Image copyright Anna Lord

“The days continued along these lines; with meticulous attention to detail, no request was too much trouble and every bite that we ate was delicious.”


“No matter how amazing the lodge, the food and the service, no safari is complete without an incredible guide… Their passion for wildlife and professionalism in their work are very special indeed.”


“Matthew is now a hero in our house. All of our children sobbed saying goodbye to him and have talked about him to anyone who will listen. He had such an incredible impact on all of them and us. They learned so much from him, including stories about Masai life, learning how to make and use a bow and arrow, and lessons about traditional remedies.”

Image copyright Anna Lord

“For anyone who wants to visit the Serengeti without sacrificing an ounce of luxury, I wholeheartedly recommend Sasakwa. My only regret is that we didn’t stay for longer so that we could enjoy more of what the lodge itself had to offer.”

Image copyright Anna Lord

You can read Anna’s full review on TripAdvisor. Please contact our Reservations team to plan your own visit to this spectacular part of the world.

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