Rhino Horn Treatment at Singita Sabi Sand

The plight of the critically endangered rhino population is one of the more heartbreaking realities of life as custodians of over half a million acres of land in Southern and East Africa. Singita is proud to be a part of a number of projects aimed at eliminating the poaching of these majestic animals for their horns, including the Rhino Reintroduction Programme at Singita Pamushana Lodge (Zimbabwe) and the anti-poaching unit at Singita Sabi Sand (South Africa) which uses specially-trained tracker dogs to deter and catch would-be poachers.

Rhino Horn Treatment at Singita Sabi Sand

As part of these ongoing efforts, we are now participating in a horn infusion treatment programme, which was pioneered by the Rhino Rescue Project in the Sabi Sand. The horn is treated by infusing it with a compound made up of an antiparasitic drug and indelible dye that contaminates the horn and renders it useless for ornamental or medicinal use. A full DNA sample is harvested and three matching identification microchips are inserted into the horns and the animal itself.

Rhino Horn Treatment at Singita Sabi Sand

This treatment  has resulted in zero losses in areas where it has been applied, and is seen as an important intervention to deflect prospective poachers. Over 100 rhino have already been treated in the reserve and all animals in the initial treatment sample are in excellent health. Since all the products used in the treatment are biodegradable and eco-friendly, there are no long-term effects on the environment. The treatment “grows” out with the horn and so poses no long-term effect and, if a treated animal dies of natural causes, retrieval and registration of the horn is a legal requirement.

Rhino Horn Treatment at Singita Sabi Sand

Please visit the Rhino Rescue Project website for more information and FAQs on the treatment. You can also find out more about Singita’s wildlife conservation initiatives and environmental protection policies on our site.

Photographs courtesy of Singita Field Guide Dylan Brandt. 


Similar blog Posts

Singita Grumeti, Tanzania

Singita Grumeti Fund: A Productive Partnership

Today, visitors to the western corridor of the Serengeti, where Singita is the custodian of a 350,000-acre concession, are surrounded by lush grasslands and healthy herds of migrating wildlife. Thirteen years ago, however, this area was near-barren, as uncontrolled hunting and rampant poaching had decimated local wildlife populations. Thanks to the intervention of American philanthropist,…

Read More
Conservation & Community at Singita

Conservation & Community: Finding the Perfect Balance

Creating the ideal, sustainable balance between nature conservation and the empowerment of local communities, and the environmentally conscious hospitality model that supports these activities, is at the core of how Singita operates. This positively enhancing equilibrium allows us to provide an unparalleled safari experience and share a unique part of the world with our guests,…

Read More

Lodges and Camps

Wildlife

Food

lamai-wildlife-report-october-1
Latest Wildlife Report

Singita Lamai

With the bulk of the migration having moved south across the Mara River to begin their trek on to the short grass plains of the southern Serengeti, the Lamai Triangle is somewhat quieter. There were a few small crossings witnessed in the month, these consisted of small numbers of wildebeest. Their departure doesn’t mean the...

Read More
View all Wildlife Reports

Videos from Singita

Latest Video

Singita Serengeti House - The Inspiration

Overlooking a well-visited waterhole on the south-eastern slopes of Sasakwa Hill, this welcoming exclusive-use retreat for families and friends is chosen for carefree private relaxation in a home-like atmosphere. This is a happy, vibrant place conducive to bonding and making precious memories in one of Africa’s most beautiful locations.

Environmental Education - Komanani
Community & Conservation
Singita Wildlife Showcase Video
A Wildlife Showcase
All Videos