Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita

The next best thing to being in the bush yourself has to be catching up on the monthly Wildlife Reports, written and photographed by our field guides. Staggering landscapes, noteworthy sightings, thrilling kills and – our personal favourite – updates on the latest little newborns, fill the pages of these journals. Here is a recap of the latest stories straight from the bush:

Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Pamushana
We have a couple of sunken photographic hides at various pans on the property, but the most popular in the last
month has been the one at Whata Pan. The hide offers the most amazing opportunities to observe animals that are usually shy of human presence. For example, a family of warthogs trotted in with great speed and enthusiasm and were the noisiest visitors by far, signalling their arrival with a fanfare of snorks, snorts and grunts.

Written and photographed by Jenny Hishin. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report September 2014

Singita Grumeti, Tanzania

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Grumeti
If August was ‘big zebra’ month, September must go down as ‘big cat’ month. It was a great month for predator activity and guests witnessed several hunts and kills. September also saw thousands of wildebeest moving through
the concession, mostly in a south and westerly direction into the Serengeti National Park.

Report by By Stuart Levine. Photos by Alfred Ngwarai, Braya Masunga and Joe Kibwe. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report September 2014

Singita Kruger National Park, South Africa

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Kruger National Park
There were 99 separate lion sightings in August. The Mountain Pride seem to have moved out of the guarri thickets around the northern areas and are spending most of their time out the concession near the Gudzane East windmill. The Xhirombe Pride male seems to have taken on a companion male and one of the male cubs was moving on his own along the river for half the month, scavenging off the male leopard.

Report by Danie Vermeulen and Nick du Plessis. Photos by Nick du Plessis and Barry Peiser. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report August 2014

Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Sabi Sand
As the lioness got closer the larger male hippo started thrashing the water with his head, gaping and defecating – all signs of aggression to indicate to the lioness that he wanted her to move out of his comfort zone. But she moved closer, with a bit more caution, and wasn’t deterred from taking a long drink. The rest of the pride took courage from this and approached the edge of the water.

Report by Mark Broodryk, Leon van Wyk, Crystal Perry, Dave Steyn, Francois Fourie and Andy Gabor. Photos by Ross Couper, Andy Gibor and Dave Steyn. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report August 2014

Singita Lamai, Tanzania

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Lamai
The Great Migration arrived in Lamai at the end of June and the wildebeest were a continuous presence throughout July. August did not disappoint either as the herds remained in the general vicinity, crossing north and south and north again across the Mara River, in the surrounds of Singita Mara River Tented Camp. Guests enjoyed 12 dramatic crossings during the month. One particularly exciting crossing happened right in front of the camp, and lasted for over 20 minutes.

Report by By Lizzie Hamrick. Photos by Ryan Schmitt and Evan Visconti. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report August 2014


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