Jenny Hishin – Singita Guide – shares some of her experiences from Singita Pamushana Lodge.


I’ve mentioned that we’ve been having some hair-raisingly close encounters with a black rhino (Diceros bicornis) around the area of the Malilangwe Dam, at the foot of the lodge. The story began in June when staff members awoke to the colossal sounds of huffing, puffing, bashing and crashing.

Two male black rhinos were engaged in a mighty battle over what seemed to be a territorial dispute. One of the bulls was injured but our scouts managed to keep track of him and determine the extent of his injuries – thankfully he recovered well.

The battle aside, this aggression over territory is an encouraging sign for us because it has been observed that rhinos in low density populations become more territorial and less tolerant of intruders as their population density increases.

Rhinos use dung and urine to stake out the areas of their rule, and their middens act as important communication posts to other rhinos wanting to pass through the area peacefully or challenge the ruler for it.

Black rhinos are not as social as white rhinos (Ceratotherium simum) and solitary individuals of both sexes are likely to be encountered. They have earned the reputation from humans as irascible, temperamental animals that prefer to investigate and possibly chase off a potential threat, rather than wait to be attacked or hope that the intruder will go away.

Three months after the initial battle it now seems certain that the victor enjoys the banks of the vast dam as his exclusive real estate.  A highlight of a peaceful boat cruise on the luxury Suncatcher is to spot him on the dam’s green fringe – and a highlight of a far less peaceful excursion is to find him in the harbour area where we moor the boats!

For more of Jenny Hishin’s wildlife updates, follow the monthly Singita Pamushana Guides’ Diary – posted on Singita’s website.


Similar blog Posts

Singita Faru Faru Lodge 1

Catching Up with the Team at Singita Faru Faru Lodge

Built on a gently sloping hill alongside the Grumeti River, Singita Faru Faru Lodge is positioned on the renowned migratory route in 350,000 acres of the Serengeti’s epic grasslands. It is a very special spot, and one where guests have the unique opportunity to experience a very close connection with the wilderness. With an ever-changing…

Read More
Cellar dinner at Singita Sweni Lodge

Drink in the Romance at Singita Sweni Lodge

Romance is well catered for at Singita Sweni Lodge, whether that means a couples massage at the spa, a late-night stargazing experience or sleeping outside on your suite’s private deck. Food and wine are also a big part of any visit to Singita, and a special cellar dinner just for two makes for a truly…

Read More

Lodges and Camps

Wildlife

Food

sss-wildlife-report7
Latest Wildlife Report

Singita Sabi Sand

‘Tis the season of all things small. The last few weeks we have been fortunate enough to watch the Sand River rise and fall shortly after a rainfall in the evening. It’s been building up and the few showers that we have experienced have been a delight, as we watched the bush turn a dark...

Read More
View all Wildlife Reports

Videos from Singita

Latest Video

Singita Serengeti House - The Inspiration

Overlooking a well-visited waterhole on the south-eastern slopes of Sasakwa Hill, this welcoming exclusive-use retreat for families and friends is chosen for carefree private relaxation in a home-like atmosphere. This is a happy, vibrant place conducive to bonding and making precious memories in one of Africa’s most beautiful locations.

Environmental Education - Komanani
Community & Conservation
Singita Wildlife Showcase Video
A Wildlife Showcase
All Videos