Wildlife Report

The Singita Wildlife Report


First-hand ranger reports from the bushveld

Singita Pamushana

February 2014 - Pamushana, Zimbabwe

The kingdom of fungi

I can’t help it, so here goes: A mushroom walks into a bar and orders a drink. The barman says, “Sorry, we don’t serve mushrooms.” The mushroom replies, “Hey! What do you mean – I’m a fun guy!” But seriously, what is the difference between mushrooms and fungI? The simple answer is that mushrooms are the reproductive organs of certain types of fungi. Fungi, just like plants and animals, own a kingdom of classification all on their own. They are organisms such as moulds, mushrooms and yeasts that are totally different from plants and animals. In fact, they are a little closer on the scale to animals than plants because they don’t depend on photosynthesis to make their own food, and have to get their nourishment from other sources.

 

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report February 2014


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 21,5°C (70,7°F)
  • Average maximum 30,5°C (86,9°F)
  • Minimum recorded 19,0°C (66,2°F)
  • Maximum recorded 34,1°C (93,3°F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 126,0 mm
  • For the year to date: 358,0 mm

Singita Lamai

January 2014 - Lamai, Tanzania

Don’t be surprised on your journey from the airstrip to Mara River Tented Camp if you see a herd of elephants on the way. There is a group of resident bulls who spend most of their time along the banks of the Mara River and are often seen from the road about a half a kilometre from camp. The migration left the Lamai area at the end of November last year, so I was surprised when guide Adas Anthony showed me photos he took in January of wildebeest cows and their brand new calves, including one that had just been born mere minutes before he approached the sighting. Curious to know the reason for this unusual occurrence, I began asking him many questions. Had some of the migration still not passed through? Was there a break-away herd making their way south later than usual? Did the mothers stay behind because they knew they were going to have calves earlier?

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report January 2014


Singita Grumeti

January 2014 - Grumeti, Tanzania

January began with the usual large amounts of rain as the short rains continued into their last days, followed by lots of sunshine. The net result was a very beautiful green landscape at Singita Grumeti for the second half of the month with the grasses growing higher and higher, and for the first time in close to six months we did not have any migratory wildebeest herds in the area to mow it down. The lush long grass will be a mainstay with us, most likely until the return of the wildebeest sometime in June or July.

Pride dynamics

About six months to a year after the split of the Butamtam Pride, another of our local prides was showing
signs of a permanent division. The Nyasirori Pride had separated into two groups in the last four months. Three of the lionesses had cubs in the last quarter of 2013, and therefore the guides assumed it was a temporary split. Lionesses will spend a lot of time away from their pride from the time they are about to give birth until the cubs are about eight weeks old. When the cubs reach this coming of age, their mother will introduce them to the pride.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report January 2014


Temperatures

  • Average maximum 33.7 °C
  • Average minimum 16.2 °C
  • Average wind speed 0.3 m/s

Rainfall

  • Sasakwa 60.6 mm
  • Sabora 36.5 mm
  • Faru Faru 51 mm
  • Samaki 321.5 mm
  • Risiriba 183.0 mm

Singita Kruger National Park

January 2014 - Singita Kruger National Park, South Africa

To whom do those spots belong?

With a slight chill still present and our minds flooded with the previous day’s sightings we are welcomed by the dawn chorus. It is early morning and the sun rays haven’t found their way to the foothills of the Lebombo Mountains. We are driving north in search of buffalo. We had been chatting away, still discussing that beautiful leopardess we saw, the Sticky Thorn female, and her whereabouts of the past week, when my attention is suddenly drawn elsewhere. The now well-known sign of his right hand that points backward to me in a slow rise makes me stop the vehicle very quickly. My tracker has spotted tracks and wants to have a closer look. Upon investigation we found a very large drag mark crossing the road. The possibility of it being an African rock python is quickly eliminated by the hair of an impala stuck on a branch and the leopardess track right next to it.
Territorially it has to be the Mahlangulene female.  She’s killed an impala and dragged it to a safer place. We start to follow the drag mark in the vehicle, everyone on the edge of their seats. Because of the length of the grass following the trail proves difficult. Sitting in a patch of short grass there she is, licking her right paw as she grooms herself after dragging her well-earned meal to safety. We continue to try and find the impala carcass but she’s chosen such a good spot that not even our trained eyes can locate it.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report January 2014


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 19.7°C (67.46°F)
  • Average maximum 31°C (87.8°F)
  • Minimum recorded 12°C (53.6°F)
  • Maximum recorded 35°C (95°F)/li>

Rainfall

  • For the period: 116.5 mm
  • For the year to date: 116.5 mm

Singita Sabi Sand

January 2014 - Sabi Sand, South Africa

The best time to come on safari is… Article by Dylan Brandt

Right now! The Sabi Sand Wildtuin is a special piece of land perfectly placed for exceptional game viewing all year round. One often hears that the best time to come on safari is in the winter. The bush will be dry so spotting animals will be easier, true. There is perennial water on the property where elsewhere water is scarce and the animals are drawn to these parts, true. But what about summer and the ‘wetter’ season? To the west of the Sabi Sand Wildtuin lies the Drakensburg mountain range and it is this mountain range and the moist air blown over the warm Mozambique current off shore that creates an oasis below. When this moist air hits the mountain the air rises and condenses to form clouds, these clouds now full of moisture fall east of the mountains and release rain throughout the lowveld where we are, leaving much of the highveld a semi desert.

 

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report January 2014


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 18.0˚C (64.4˚F)
  • Average maximum 30.0˚C (86.0˚F)
  • Minimum recorded 12.0˚C (53.6˚F)
  • Maximum recorded 39.0˚C (102.2˚F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 91 mm
  • For the year to date: 508 mm

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