Wildlife Report

The Singita Wildlife Report


First-hand ranger reports from the bushveld

Singita Lamai

December 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

Elephant weaning
It looks as if the young baby elephant in the pictures that follow is feeding on some grass, just like mom, but looks can be deceiving…Baby elephants normally nurse until their mother has another calf, which would typically be when they are four to five years old. They don’t really have full control and functionality of their trunk until they are around one year old, at which point they will start eating a little bit of greenery. They copy the older members of their herd though, so they’ll go through the motions as best they can, which makes them even cuter!

The escarpment
This mountainous horizon marking the border between Kenya and Tanzania is one of the most recognizable features of the Lamai area. It also provides a beautiful background for wildlife photos taken by our field guides.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singitas Lamai Wildlife Report December 2013


Singita Sabi Sand

December 2013 - Sabi Sand, South Africa

The colours of summer

I often get the question from guests about the best time of year to visit this wildlife haven. Far too often people are left with the impression that summer is not a good time because the vegetation is too thick to find any animals. Whilst there is an element of truth in that I can assure you that if you only ever visit during the dry season you are missing out on an explosion of colour and beauty. Summer in South Africa is the time of plenty. Thanks to a good rainfall, food is abundant and animals need not venture too far to find water. Many species such as Cape buffalo, impala and zebra give birth in this season. It makes sense as there’s enough food for the mothers to produce sufficient amounts of milk, and once the babies are weaned they will have no problem finding nutrient-rich food to eat.


Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlfie Report December 2013


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 17.9˚C (64.4˚F)
  • Average maximum 28.0˚C (82.4˚F)
  • Minimum recorded 16.0˚C (60.8˚F)
  • Maximum recorded 38.0˚C (100.4˚F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 270 mm
  • For the year to date: 417 mm

Singita Pamushana

December 2013 - Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Festive season celebrations are in full swing and the heat is on! In southern Africa Christmas and New Year are best enjoyed around a pool where youngsters can play and splash in the cool water and the adults can take refuge in the shade. The sighting I’d like to tell you about reminded me of such a joyous summer jamboree and it was one of the highlights of my life. I was out scouting and had arrived at the deck overlooking Nduna Dam. Carrying my heavy camera gear up the path and arriving on the deck I was a bit disappointed that there were no animals to be seen. All the same I decided to sit there quietly for a while and see if anything would emerge from the green boundary and drink at the water’s edge. But as I sat there I became convinced that I could hear splashing coming from the other side of the steep rocky outcrop that juts into the
horse-shoe dam. I grabbed two lenses and began creeping up the side of the cliff. A steep ledge jutted above the area of the noise and I scrambled up it on my belly like a rather ungainly lizard.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report December 2013


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 21,6°C (70,8°F)
  • Average maximum 32,8°C (91,4°F)
  • Minimum recorded 19,5°C (67,1°F))
  • Maximum recorded 41,5°C (106,7°F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 172,4 mm
  • For the year to date: 629,2 mm)

Singita Grumeti

December 2013 - Grumeti, Tanzania

In our October Journal we covered what we were sure was the final time we would see the migration until their return in about June or July. The herds entered our property for about a week, then exited making their way back south. What we never predicted was that they would unexpectedly loop back around. At some point after they left us in October, the bulk of the herds turned back north. In late November, hundreds of thousands were in the northern Serengeti at our Singita Mara River Tented Camp (see our Singita Lamai: Mara River Tented Camp November Journal). By the first day of December they were back at Singita Grumeti again, on Sasakwa plains, Sabora plains, and continuing onto the plains West of Sabora Tented Camp. They soon covered the entire property spreading from Sabora to Sasakwa to Faru Faru and further. Usually in December the wildebeest should be nearing Ndutu in the southern Serengeti, some 85 kilometres south of Singita Grumeti. The best explanation for their postponed journey most likely has to do with the rains, which arrived later than usual in the southern half of the Serengeti and, in turn, delayed the growth of suitable grass for the wildebeest. The herds moved on by the middle of the month, but their time with us produced a variety of exciting spectacles – the stories follow…

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report December 2013


Singita Pamushana

December 2013 - Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Festive season celebrations are in full swing and the heat is on! In southern Africa Christmas and New Year are best enjoyed around a pool where youngsters can play and splash in the cool water and the adults can take refuge in the shade. The sighting I’d like to tell you about reminded me of such a joyous summer jamboree and it was one of the highlights of my life.

I was out scouting and had arrived at the deck overlooking Nduna Dam. Carrying my heavy camera gear up the path and arriving on the deck I was a bit disappointed that there were no animals to be seen. All the same I decided to sit there quietly for a while and see if anything would emerge from the green boundary and drink at the water’s edge. But as I sat there I became convinced that I could hear splashing coming from the other side of the steep rocky outcrop that juts into the horse-shoe dam. I grabbed two lenses and began creeping up the side of the cliff. A steep ledge jutted above the area of the noise and I scrambled up it on my belly like a rather ungainly lizard. Peering over the edge I beheld Zimbabwe’s version of the Loch Ness Monster, as I think you’ll agree from the photo alongside:

The monster turned out to be one of four elephants having the most terrific time in the water. They would completely submerge and snorkel along with their trunks sticking out, and then erupt from the surface with their tusks stabbing the air. Then a boisterous game ensued of pushing, shoving, dunking splashing and spraying. To end it off they parted the water gracefully and serenely, their skin and tusks gleaming clean, and melted silently away.

 

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report December 2013


Temperatures

  • Average minimum: 21,6˚C (70,8˚F)
  • Average maximum: 32,8˚C (91,4˚F)
  • Minimum recorded: 19,5˚C (67,1˚F)
  • Maximum recorded: 41,5˚C (106,7˚F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 172,4 mm
  • For the year to date: 629,2 mm

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