Wildlife Report

The Singita Wildlife Report


First-hand ranger reports from the bushveld

Singita Pamushana

January 2015 - Pamushana, Zimbabwe

It doesn’t rain – it pours! But then it clears a couple of hours later and you see extraordinary sights in sparkling light set against gunmetal grey skies. The grass is at its zenith this month, and invariably I think to myself, “Well, unless something is sauntering down the middle of the road I’m not going to spot it…” But, time and again that is exactly what happens – the animals use the road network more than ever because they don’t want unseen dangers sneaking up on them in the long grass and they don’t want to be disadvantaged by the grass obscuring their surroundings. The tiger fishing has been great, the day trips to Chilojo Cliffs in neighbouring Gonarezhou National Park most
enjoyable, and the ancient rock art on our reserve is always a highlight, but the wildlife highlights for the month include a lion and lioness ‘on honeymoon’, a herd of buffalo numbering close to 500, close encounters with black rhinos, the hyena den-site with new cubs, a pack of 23 wild dogs, two lionesses with five cubs, an adult hyena
that was wallowing at a waterhole and was chased away by a white rhino and her calf, as well as lots of excellent bird of prey activity such as a martial eagle and an African hawk-eagle hunting guinea fowl, gabar goshawks and lesser spotted eagles hunting queleas at the quelea colonies and sightings of tawny eagle s and secretary birds.

Download the full wildlife report here: SP Wildlife Report Jan 2015


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 21,9°C (71,4°F)
  • Average maximum 32,2°C (89,9°F)
  • Minimum recorded 19,5°C (67,1°F)
  • Maximum recorded 38,5°C (101,3°F)

Rainfall

  • For the month: 2,2 mm
  • For the year to date: 2,2 mm

Singita Sabi Sand

January 2015 - Sabi Sand, South Africa

Lion roaring Article by Francois Fourie

It’s a sound that can be heard from kilometres away and one of the greatest things of living in the bush. Sitting around a fire with friends and hearing the roar of a male lion from afar calling to his brothers…A lion’s roar is not only used for the purpose of making contact with their pride members but it is also done to announce his presence in his territory and to make sure that any other potential intruders stay away. It truly is one of the most special experiences sitting with a male lion only 10 metres away and he starts roaring. That feeling is one that you can’t put into words… even more so when it is a pitch dark night with only starlight above and he starts to roar… your whole body can feel the vibrations of the roar right to your very core! Once you’ve heard Africa’s biggest cat roar then you can truly understand why people call this magnificent animal the “King” of the jungle!

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report January 2015


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 18.8˚C (65.8˚F)
  • Average maximum 33˚C (91.4˚F)
  • Minimum recorded 16˚C (60.8˚F)
  • Maximum recorded 41˚C (105.80˚F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 13 mm
  • For the year to date: 13 mm

Singita Kruger National Park

January 2015 - Singita Kruger National Park, South Africa

Bitten off more than they can chew…

The Shishangaan male lions brought down a fully-grown female giraffe in the middle of the month. They seem to have perfected a hunting technique of late, with it being their third giraffe kill in as many months. The biology of a giraffe is an interesting bit of evolution. With a giraffe’s build being as elongated as it is, it needs an extremely large heart to pump the necessary blood all the way up the long neck. If you compare it to adult humans our hearts weigh about three kilograms, but an adult giraffe’s weighs in excess of 12 kg! What the lions seem to have learnt is that the height of the giraffe is its biggest defence, and the normal way of getting around the throat or back of the neck is simply not possible. Instead they use a technique that involves chasing a giraffe into a rocky or uneven area, in the hope of it losing its footing or eventually colliding with a small tree.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park January 2015


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 20.1°C (68.1°F)
  • Average maximum 31°C (87.8°F)
  • Minimum recorded 17°C (62.6°F)
  • Maximum recorded 37°C (98.6°F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 33.5 mm
  • For the year to date: 33.5 mm

Singita Pamushana

December 2014 - Pamushana, Zimbabwe

It’s been a month of festivities and feasting for all – especially the predators. Early bird guests and guides have seen a female cheetah chasing an impala – but speed’s not everything, the impala jinked away to safety. Using the same strategy a wildebeest outwitted a lion after a high-speed chase and the bull made a great escape into the thick bush. We’ve seen a pack of 26 African wild dogs hunting along the river and a young male leopard stalking impalas. This journal details two predator feasts, and if you, like me, cannot eat dinner and watch Grey’s Anatomy at the same time due to the gory images I suggest you keep all food far away from you, especially any carpaccio! The predators did reveal their softer sides as well this month, such as when a clan of five adult hyenas delighted guests by playing with their four cubs next to the road and when two lionesses showed off their five cubs of different ages, the youngest being a 12-week-old ball of fluff.

 

Read the full report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report Dec 2014


Temperatures

  • Average Minimum:27.1°C (71°F)
  • Average Maximum:32.3°C (90.1°F)
  • Minimum Recorded:16.5°C (61.7°F)
  • Maximum Recorded:38.9°C (102°F)

Rainfall

  • For the period: 148 mm
  • For the year to date:791.6 mm

Singita Grumeti

December 2014 - Grumeti, Tanzania

Leopard update

A number of leopard sightings in the past year have contributed significantly to the continued improvement of leopard habituation at Singita Grumeti. Our recent, most noteworthy sighting yet, was that of a female leopard stalking and killing a male impala west of Faru Faru in the late afternoon, witnessed by Field Guide, Jeremiah and his guests. This is a clear indicator that leopards in the reserve have become more accepting of our safari-traversing activities and that they have slowly reverted to the type of hunting behaviour which is typical of leopards (for the first time in approximately 50 years). Leopards characteristically hunt both during the day and at night. However, in the seven years prior to 2003, before Grumeti became a photographic safari destination, it was in fact a hunting area. It was then that leopards in this area adapted to hunting only at night when the potential human threat was not around. Until almost a year ago, witnessing a leopard kill on the reserve was completely unheard of! Fortunately, these big cats are beginning to feel more comfortable and the kill that Jeremiah and his guests saw, was in fact the third kill we have recorded this year!

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report December 2014


Temperatures

  • Average minimum 29.4˚C (84.9˚F)
  • Average maximum 16.4˚C (61.5˚F)

Rainfall

  • Sasakwa 100.7 mm
  • Sabora 98 mm
  • Faru Faru 67.5 mm
  • Samaki 208 mm
  • Risiriba 105 mm

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