Wildlife Report

The Singita Wildlife Report


First-hand ranger reports from the bushveld

Singita Lamai

February 2014 - Lamai, Tanzania

February in Lamai was characterised by breath-taking landscapes and open spaces teeming with wildlife. The amount of general game in the area was thriving, to be rivalled only by those months when the great migration is moving through.  Two cheetahs set against a backdrop of seemingly never-ending plains, dotted with a few squiggly balanites trees: one of the many things about Lamai that is so quintessentially Africa.  Plains are the perfect habitat for cheetahs, which need large expanses of flat ground to build up their speed. The one problem with the flat plains is the difficulty to get a good view of what’s going on, so cheetahs are often seen on top of termite mounds or fallen trees, getting a better look at things.  The cheetahs at Singita Lamai are very lucky to have an excellent viewing point, given to them by none other than us humans – the Tanzania-Kenya border post. Senior Guide Saitoti was watching these two males relaxing under a tree when one decided to hop on the post and look for any available prey in the area. The agile cat jumped up and looked around, checking out the landscape.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report February 2014


Singita Lamai

January 2014 - Lamai, Tanzania

Don’t be surprised on your journey from the airstrip to Mara River Tented Camp if you see a herd of elephants on the way. There is a group of resident bulls who spend most of their time along the banks of the Mara River and are often seen from the road about a half a kilometre from camp. The migration left the Lamai area at the end of November last year, so I was surprised when guide Adas Anthony showed me photos he took in January of wildebeest cows and their brand new calves, including one that had just been born mere minutes before he approached the sighting. Curious to know the reason for this unusual occurrence, I began asking him many questions. Had some of the migration still not passed through? Was there a break-away herd making their way south later than usual? Did the mothers stay behind because they knew they were going to have calves earlier?

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report January 2014


Singita Lamai

December 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

Elephant weaning
It looks as if the young baby elephant in the pictures that follow is feeding on some grass, just like mom, but looks can be deceiving…Baby elephants normally nurse until their mother has another calf, which would typically be when they are four to five years old. They don’t really have full control and functionality of their trunk until they are around one year old, at which point they will start eating a little bit of greenery. They copy the older members of their herd though, so they’ll go through the motions as best they can, which makes them even cuter!

The escarpment
This mountainous horizon marking the border between Kenya and Tanzania is one of the most recognizable features of the Lamai area. It also provides a beautiful background for wildlife photos taken by our field guides.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singitas Lamai Wildlife Report December 2013


Singita Lamai

November 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

In the October report we wrote that we were sure the last of the migratory herds were leaving the area, making their journey back south. It probably was the last of the herds, but what we didn’t consider was that they would prematurely turn around and come back!

In late November the Lamai area was once again flooded with hundreds of thousands of wildebeest. Normally by late November the wildebeest should be in the central Serengeti, about 100 kilometres south of Lamai, and en route to the short grass plains of Ndutu in the southern Serengeti where they calve.

Of course, like the weather, no one can ever 100% predict the Great Migration, and in fact the weather has everything to do with their return to Lamai.

The rains started later than usual this year, and the southern areas of the Serengeti were still rather dry. This explains the wildebeest’s return to the much more lush and green grasses of the Lamai triangle, where there was still a steady amount of rain.

If the excitement of their return wasn’t enough, guests were able to view a crossing of about 80 animals just 300 metres away from the camp!

Who knows what their next move will be?

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report November 2013


Singita Lamai

October 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

The Mara River is a water wonderland that dominates the Lamai triangle. The river and the small springs and tributaries that feed into it, provide generous access to water for the game living here, whether it be for drinking, cooling off or just having fun. The festival of life plays out on the seamless banks that stretch unhindered to the horizon, but every now and then the urge to cross the river is irresistible, and the drama reaches its zenith.

 

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report October 2013


Singita Lamai

September 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

We can’t stop talking about the migration in this wildlife report, but it’s because the migrants are always here! After strong showings in July and August, the herds of wildebeest continued to impress throughout September. River crossings were a daily occurrence and there were 35 crossings in the Mara River Tented Camp area, in the 30 days of the month. What follows is a photo essay of the sights – I think you’ll agree the images speak for themselves.

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlfie Report September 2013


Singita Lamai

July 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

About a week after the bulk of the Migration left Singita Grumeti, they began filtering into the area where Singita Mara River Tented Camp is located, in the remote Lamai Triangle, on the bank of the famous Mara River. They first arrived in the Kogatende area about 10 kilometres south of the camp and reachable by game drive. After a couple of days though, game drives were no longer necessary, as thousands of wildebeest congregated right across the river from camp. The numbers grew and grew, the great herds waiting until the last possible minute before they had to face the inevitable – crossing the croc-infested Mara River. Whether pushed in by the shoving behind them or out of pure bravery, the first wildebeest eventually made the leap of faith into the mighty Mara. Within a second of that first leap thousands followed. The crossing was a truly amazing spectacle. These wildebeests are not only susceptible to the dangerous jaws of the crocodiles, but also to each other. With the huge number of them crossing the river, individuals are also accidentally pushed under and drowned by their own kind.

 

Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report July 2013


Singita Lamai

January 2013 - Lamai, Tanzania

The rains have held off this month, giving the area a chance to dry up a bit and colours to change. This, combined with a hot easterly wind, has turned the palette from all shades of green to burnt amber, ochre and dark browns with just a pale under-shading of green to remind us of what was, and what is, to come. The plains east of us have been exceptionally productive over the month, with regular sightings of elephants, buffalos, rhinos, lions and plains game. Hyenas pass the heat of the day lying in the little pools of water in the now almost dry drainage lines, and cheetahs stalk the plains on their long legs, cubs in tow, as they search for something to chase down and eat. The next time you are on safari take some time to enjoy the dazzling zebras you are bound to see – they are among the most photogenic of animals and there is always something going on if you spend a little time watching a herd.


Temperatures

  • Average Minimum:0°C (32°F)
  • Average Maximum:0°C (32°F)
  • Minimum Recorded:0°C (32°F)
  • Maximum Recorded:0°C (32°F)

Rainfall

  • For the period:62 mm (2 in)
  • For the year to date:62 mm (2 in)

Singita Lamai

November 2012 - Lamai, Tanzania

In the northern portion of the Serengeti National Park lies an area known as the Lamai Triangle, it is from here that I write this. The Lamai Triangle lies between the Mara River in the south with the Kenyan border and adjacent Serengeti National Park Border making up the other two sides. It is an area of 779 square kilometres (approximately 300 square miles) made up predominately of open grass plains. The Lamai Triangle was only incorporated into the Serengeti National Park in 1965, a move that has, without doubt, been of benefit to the great wildebeest migration. The Lamai Triangle is known as one of the best all year round game viewing destinations in the world, when the wildebeest and zebra are not migrating through this area there are large herds of resident game, such as buffalo, elephant and eland.


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