Tag Archives: Private Game Reserve

Getting to know Malilangwe

March 28, 2011 - Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Singita Pamushana Lodge,Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, home to Singita Pamushana Lodge, presents a unique sanctuary for wildlife conservation in Africa.  The reserve’s core objective is to provide a naturally functioning ecosystem, where the full spectrum of wild species native to the area are protected, and where these species can live as they have for thousands of years.

Located adjacent to the Gonarezhou National Park in the south-eastern corner of Zimbabwe, Malilangwe occupies an area of 400 km2 of geologically and floristically diverse habitats. In all, 38 distinct plant communities are identified and early government prospectors described the area as ‘very wild broken country.

The rugged but breathtakingly beautiful sandstone hills, with their deep secret ravines and plateaus, likely earned the area this reputation. Weathered grey, sometimes cracked and sometimes smooth, they are adorned with lime, grey and orange lichen. White fig tree roots strangle then split the rock to reveal a myriad of sunset colours. These bewitching hills straddle the property and provide a refuge for mountain acacia and iron wood trees. Under their shade klipspringer and hyraxes hide themselves; wild dogs den and Black Eagles soar.  The hills are studded with fairytale springs and seeps which are favoured watering holes for black rhino, swimming pools for elephants and mud wallows for ‘dagga boys’ – the ill-tempered old buffalo bulls who have left the herd.  Numerous San rock art paintings, dating back to the Late Stone Age (more than 2000 years ago), bear witness to the historic diversity of animals that occupied this area, and whose descendents still roam free.

In the heart of the hills lies the Malilangwe lake, reputed in Zimbabwe for the excellent fishing opportunities it affords. The lake is also home to hippos and crocodiles, and an array of water birds. Few sites could offer a more spectacular fishing spot or sun-downer cruise.

To the south of the hills the soils are dark and rich – derived from basalt rock of the Jurassic period. In this semi-arid savanna, herds of plains species such as impala, zebra and wildebeest graze, and giraffe can be seen browsing Acacia trees. Lichtenstein’s hartebeest and sable also favour this area, but are more elusive. Woven through the mopane and Acacia trees are stream-like depressions that function as ‘vleis’ (open moist grasslands). These provide food for bulk grazers like white rhino and the herds of more than 500 buffalo.

North of the hills is black rhino and wild dog country. This densely wooded area makes game viewing difficult but extremely rewarding. Amongst the Grewia scrub grow giant baobab trees. Hollows in their gnarled branches trap water and their silvery limbs are home to Buffalo Weavers and honey bees. By-gone hunters used climbing pegs to scale the massive stems in search of honey and water. In some trees these climbing pegs are still evident while in others only swirling scars remain.

The Chiredzi River, a perennial source of water, forms the western boundary of Malilangwe. On it’s sandy banks grow tall ebony and sausage trees. They camouflage the rare and mysterious Pel’s Fishing Owl, and in the tangled ‘wait-a-bit’ undergrowth shy nyala feed, bushbuck bark and francolin call. Lions, leopards and hyenas traverse the entire property, and are often heard calling at night.

As a result of a healthy, functioning ecosystem, game has thrived at Malilangwe.  Population growth has soared to such an extent that Malilangwe has been able to restock other wildlife areas in Zimbabwe. Of particular pride are the black and white rhino populations which have grown so well over the past 10 years that Malilangwe is now able to restock other parts of Africa with these remarkable, endangered species.

Article contribution by Sarah Clegg, BSc, MSc – Consulting Ecologist at Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve for the past 15 years.

To view the Malilangwe wildlife in their natural habitat, follow Kim Wolhuter’s extraordinary video footage published regularly on Singita’s Facebook page.  Kim is an internationally acclaimed, documentary film-maker residing on the Malilangwe Reserve recording footage for upcoming documentary projects.

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Wine on Safari

October 18, 2010 - Awards,Cuisine,Events,Experience

If you haven’t experienced ‘The Premier Wine Boutique’ on site at Singita Sabi Sand then you may not have known that Singita is recognised as one of South Africa’s most influential buyers of wine, with an extensive cellar showcasing a premium selection of wines, including some of the country’s most sought-after private reserves and limited release wines.

With a wine list that encompasses approximately 222 labels and just the South African Singita lodge cellars comprising 20 000 bottles, it can safely be said that wine is a key ingredient of the unique Singita experience. The Singita wine list has received numerous Awards of Excellence, the top Diners Club Wine List accolade as well as other significant local and international recognition.

What is extra special is that guests may experience a wine during their stay at Singita and want to use the services of Singita Premier Wine Direct to either take home ‘specially packed’ wine as ‘checked luggage’ or SPWD can assist to make up unique consignments to be freighted on a guest’s behalf.  The Singita collection of wines includes sought-after Exclusive Release, Limited Single Vineyard and Rare Auction Wines.

Whether guests are wine connoisseurs or just love wine they revel in the opportunity to enjoy personalised wine tastings within the unique ambience of each lodge’s own temperature-controlled cellar.  Singita’s experienced sommeliers are able to guide guests through a variety of wine styles, years and cultivars to sample those that may suit their taste.

Something that is extremely fulfilling for the Singita wine programme is that it gives back to the community too.  François Rautenbach heading up Singita Premier Wine Direct has embarked on a training programme for enthusiastic young wine lovers, and in doing so is developing the ‘next generation’ of Sommeliers for Africa providing educational assistance, personal mentoring, formal wine training and access to Africa’s Finest Wine program.

If you would like to learn more about the Singita training programme or order wine through Singita Premier Wine Direct please contact us at premierwine@singita.com.

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Why Singita is Blogging?

March 24, 2010 - Experience

The question shouldn’t be why Singita is blogging but rather why did it take us so long to start blogging?

At Singita we’ve been discussing, investigating and learning about blogging and other social media tools for quite some time. We have watched with interest as luxury brands, that we know and respect, have taken up the challenge of social media. Some of these luxury brands have been highly successful in their online endeavors, while others have burned brightly for a few weeks only to disappear without a trace.

Sunset in the Singita Grumeti Reserves.

As you can imagine we’d like our blogging and other social media activities to be consistent, to last longer than only a few short weeks. We’d like all our efforts, in this department, to add long-term value and depth to our brand and to our readers.

It’s for these reasons that it has taken us a little longer to jump on the social media bandwagon. But, that being said, here we are; we are finally taking the plunge and starting our blog.

Welcome to the official Singita Blog – our new online home for all the captivating romance, inspiring ingredients and spectacular adventures that we believe make the Singita offering shine.

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