The Singita Blog

A Love for Leopards

April 02, 2014 - Experience, Sabi Sand, Singita Boulders Lodge, Singita Ebony Lodge, Wildlife

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

As with many South Africans, I grew up visiting game reserves fairly regularly, and going on camping trips in remote locations with my family during school holidays. I completely took for granted that, at a fairly young age, I had seen such incredible creatures as lions and elephants at close proximity, and in their natural habitat.

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

It was only a couple of years ago when I visited the Kruger National Park for the first time that I realised that for all my childhood game-spotting, I had never seen a leopard in the wild. Their feline grace, exquisite colouring and enigmatic nature totally captivate me, and we spent a week scouring the bushes for these elusive spotted cats but to no avail.

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

In January I was lucky enough to visit Singita Sabi Sand for the first time and was determined to track down a leopard. James and Leon, my tracking-and-guiding team, were duly briefed and we set off into the wakening bush on the first morning game drive in search of one of the area’s resident leopards. There are a number of handsome males with territories that traverse Singita’s concession in the Sabi Sand; Nyaleti, Ravenscourt and Khashane among them. They are regularly featured in the guides’ Wildlife Reports from the region and have even been spotted in and around the lodges themselves!

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

It was an absolute thrill an hour later to discover a male leopard walking casually through the bush in front of our vehicle. We followed him through the undergrowth for a short while, and watched him leap silently into a nearby ebony tree, where he used the height of the branches to get a better view of the surrounding area. We sat in the vehicle and watched him quietly for a few moments, astounded by his beauty.

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

I was lucky enough to have two more leopard sightings in as many days at Singita Sabi Sand; both equally breathtaking. It was an experience that rendered me quite speechless and something I will treasure for the rest of my life.

Leopards at Singita Sabi Sand

All photos by field guide Ross Couper. Text by blog manager Julia da Silva.

Singita Sabi Sand is a privately owned game reserve in the Sabi Sand Reserve, adjacent to the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Spanning more than 45,000 acres, Singita Sabi Sand is renowned for high concentrations of big game and frequent leopard sightings.

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Design Details: Singita Mara River Tented Camp

March 24, 2014 - Accommodation, Experience, Lamai, Lodges and Camps, Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

In the design of Singita Mara River Tented Camp the focus was on creating an immersive experience at the famed river crossing point for the annual migration. The look and feel, conceptualised by Cécile & Boyd, is a profound celebration of contemporary African design and offers a sense of laid back luxury.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

The camp draws inspiration from its East African location, but with a feeling of bohemian glamour that seeks to balance form and function in a non-traditional way. This creates an visual ambience that is elegant but relaxed, with an industrial metal frame work in black hammorite, hung with beige tents and then lined inside in cool white cotton canvas walls and ceilings. Wooden decks and basket walls and roofs tie the camp to the site in a delicate and respectful way, ensuring that it touches the earth lightly.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

As part of their interpretation of the vision for the camp, GAPP Architects & Urban Designers created generous ‘fitto’ screens that provide shade for the outdoor dining and lounge areas, and suspended sapling walls are strategically placed the define the space and offering privacy for our guests. The tents are positioned on the edge of ‘hovering’ decks, so that one is slightly elevated, maximising the views and creating separate living areas on different levels. Fly sheets allow guests to enjoy the space and also to sleep with the main tent flaps open, while protected from inquisitive insects.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Strong contemporary design puts a fresh spin on local creativity, with inspiration coming from traditional, everyday African objects like baskets, beads and pots. There has been a distinct focus on sourcing the talented work of young inspiring African designers. The camp’s signature colour palette of camel, red, grey and charcoal has been incorporated into various decor items and furniture pieces, and live alongside timber sculptures carved from single pieces of wood. Similarly, wooden turned lights, whose shapes are derived from African pots and then extruded to form the various shapes, are expressed in a contemporary form. The lights are manufactured from sustainable jacaranda wood, while others are made of papier-mâché.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Deep, low-slung sofas and beds are layered in hand spun natural fabrics, throws and cushions of differing weights from heavy sack to sheer muslin voiles. ‘Campaign’ inspired retro travel chests in canvas and raw leather with polished metal detailing create desks, trousseaux and side tables. The relaxed atmosphere is further enhanced with bamboo cutlery, wonky crockery and wobbly glass, wood raffia and huge linen napkins bound in plaited rings.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Extensive use of sustainably sourced, hand crafted African basket ware lends a contemporary but tactile element to the design. For example the wire baskets on the screen near the pool are the exact shape and design of grain sorting baskets, but constructed in wire so that they evolve into a purely decorative element. Baskets used for filtering traditional beer have been painted and hung in a group to form an art work.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

The culture and heritage of neighbouring Masai and local Kuria tribes inspired the jewel-like colours of red, black and blue, while their use of pattern and natural materials heavily influenced the design. Throughout the interior there are items of interest to inspire the guests to see this creativity in a new way and invite the staff to share stories of how African culture and design has been interpreted in a new way.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Internal bathrooms with generous open shower areas and vanity units offer incredible views through a folded-back tent flap towards the river. In the outdoor bathroom, the tub is perfectly positioned to take full advantage of the gorgeous river view while offering total privacy. Beds face eastwards so that the rising sun acts as a natural alarm clock in the early morning, and refreshments are taken on the decks to catch the cooling breeze… the experience is designed to allow the guest to fully engage in this indescribable location.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp is the epitome of sustainable tourism and consciously seeks to eliminate the unnecessary use of energy and non-biodegradable materials. In keeping with this philosophy, the camp operates “off-the-grid” and relies entirely on a custom designed solar system for its power and the use of recycled and natural materials wherever possible. Contact our reservations team to find out more about visiting this untouched wilderness.

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Guest Feedback: Seeing the Serengeti on Horseback

March 19, 2014 - Experience, Lodges and Camps, Safari, Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp, Singita Grumeti

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

There can be few more thrilling experiences in life than discovering the vast plains of the Serengeti on horseback; the surreal romance and excitement of exploring the exquisite wilderness of this unique area at eye level with the wildlife. Singita’s day rides and longer equestrian safaris allow guests to journey across the open plains with a herd of zebra or giraffe, bringing them truly in touch with the pulse of Africa. A recent regulation passed by the Tanzanian government now allows Singita’s equestrian safaris to traverse the full breadth and width of the concession, adding even more opportunities for unique game spotting and the discovery of more remote areas of the reserve.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

David and Paula Evans traveled to Singita Grumeti from the United States last year and were so moved by the experience that they sent this kind note of thanks to Jason Trollip, Singita’s Tourism Manager for the region.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

David writes:

The purpose of this e-mail is two-fold.

First, to compliment Singita on what my wife, Paula, and I could only describe as a holiday of lifetime – made possible largely by the unstinting professionalism, charm and dedication of your on-site teams.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Whilst not wanting to decry the unbelievable quality and attention to detail in all that Singita Sasakwa Lodge and Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp we stayed at displayed in abundance, for us it was the people on the ground that made all the difference.

I would particularly single out Ali and Martin (at the Equestrian Centre) and Nick (at Explore).

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Our four-day horseback safari provided us with a series of unforgettable and quite unique moments. From the unquestionable quality of the horses, to the professionalism, skill and knowledge of Martin and Ali, these were four days we will never forget. All this topped off with Martin and Ali’s entertaining and witty company. It was also an unexpected honour to be the first guests to enter one of the reserves on horseback following the new permission recently issued by the government. For advanced riders and repeat guests, having these extra areas to explore is important we feel, given the amount of ground that can be covered on horseback. To us this is an added incentive to return!

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Sheer bliss – an experience we are desperate to repeat.

And now to Singita Explore. Paula and I have been very fortunate in life to stay at some of the best hotels/resorts in the world – we haven’t held back! But I can safely say that what Nick and the team provided us with rivalled the best – all with the challenges of being in the depths of the Serengeti. Quite remarkable. Nick was an incredible host and you could see he would do just anything to ensure your every need is catered for. A real star.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

So – we thank you all; we will be back.

I would close by saying that never before have we felt the urge to send an e-mail in such glowing terms following a holiday. You should all be very proud of what you have accomplished at Singita Grumeti.

Regards
David and Paula Evans

Our sincere thanks to David and Paula for taking the time to write this letter of appreciation. We very much look forward to welcoming you both back to Singita Grumeti!

All photos © 2013 David Evans

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Highlights from our Wildlife Reports

February 13, 2014 - Kruger National Park, Sabi Sand, Singita Grumeti, Singita Pamushana Lodge, Wildlife

One of the most popular features of our website is the monthly Wildlife Reports, penned by Singita’s field guides and including many of their incredible photos from twice-daily game drives with guests. These journals cover recent wildlife sightings, seasonal changes in the local flora, birding highlights and stunning landscape shots from all five regions in which Singita has lodges and camps. Here is a selection of photos from some recent entries for you to enjoy:

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Kruger National Park
Elephants in the Kruger National Park must be some of the most dynamic landscapers to this environment and a safari would simply not be complete without seeing one of these colossal giants strutting its stuff. These giants move prodigious distances over a large home range area rather than marking and protecting a territory, – and this makes sightings of them unpredictable and erratic. Over the past month we had an extraordinary total of 89 sightings, with at least two sightings per day. Even with the huge number of elephants scattered throughout the park and with years of research, theories and estimates on these mythical beasts, so much is still unknown about the species.

Report by Deirdre Opie, Danie Vermeulen, Jani Lourens & Nick du Plessis. Photo by Nick du Plessis. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report December 2013

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Sabi Sand
The Nyaleti male had made his way up the bank of the river and appeared in front of us. He casually walked along the bank until he reached a couple of big boulders. Instead of walking around them, he promptly hopped from boulder to boulder all the way across the river to the other side. (Watch the video – http://youtu.be/jMxeZEZGjdQ) We followed him slowly for about five minutes
before a herd of impala struck his interest. We stopped and watched from a distance as he stalked the herd.

Report by Dylan Brandt, Ross Couper, Daniella Kueck, Leon Van Wyk, Jon Morgan and François Fourie. Photographs on location by Ross Couper, François Fourie and Jon Morgan. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report January 2014

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Pamushana
This first photograph was taken during mid 2011, of a very young rhino calf, that kept charging an old rubbing post, in a very funny case of mistaken identity – the calf seemed to think the stump was a challenging intruder. White rhinos (Ceratotherium simum) have a long gestation of 16 months. Calves stay with their mother for 2 – 3 years. It’s now 2.5 years since the first photo was taken and you can see how much the calf has grown – its mother is on the right in the second photo, and the calf dominates the third photo.

Report written and photographed by Jenny Hishin. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report January 2014

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Grumeti
By early to mid December, the migratory herds would normally be nearing the short grass plains of Ndutu in the southern-most part of the Serengeti. Ndutu is the calving site for the wildebeest and they will typically spend a few months in the area, giving time for the new babies to build up their strength before they begin their arduous journey north. Calves can be expected anywhere from late December to early February, but, like with all things, some babies come earlier! Two early babies were spotted amongst the herds here, and it’s hard to say at such a young age whether they will survive the southern trek to Ndutu.

Report by Lizzie Hamrick with photographs by Ryan Schmitt and Saitoti Ole Kuwai. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report December 2013

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Lamai
This mountainous horizon marking the border between Kenya and Tanzania is one of the most recognizable features of the Lamai area. It also provides a beautiful background for wildlife photos taken by our field guides.

Report by By Lizzie Hamrick with photographs by Mishi Mtili, Saitoti Ole Kuwai and Eugen Shao. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report December 2013

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Bringing a Touch of Safari to Singapore

February 11, 2014 - Africa, Experience, General, Safari, Singita Lebombo Lodge

Singita Lifestyle Event in Singapore

Art and design form an essential part of the experience at Singita, as each lodge elegantly combines the practicalities of life in the bush with a rich palette of African-inspired colours, shapes and textures. This understated “safari chic” aesthetic was recently celebrated at an event in Singapore where likeminded creatives in the world of art, fashion, design and gastronomy came together to share in their appreciation for good style.

Singita Lifestyle Event in Singapore

The venue was transformed into a tented safari camp and pop-up boutique, showcasing international tradespeople, art, contemporary lifestyle products and fashion. Stimulating installations and collectible artworks were displayed alongside wearable art and handmade furnishings, creating a treasure trove of African craftsmanship in the middle of a bustling Asian metropolis.

Singita Lifestyle Event in Singapore

A portion of the sale proceeds in-store and online directly benefited local community and conservation programs, including Singita’s own anti-poaching canine unit operating in the Sabi Sand Reserve. In addition, Singita and Asia to Africa Safaris co-sponsored a fantastic two-night stay for two at Singita Lebombo Lodge which was raffled off at the opening gala.

Singita Lifestyle Event in Singapore

The boutiques and galleries at Singita’s lodges allow guests the opportunity to take home a memento that not only reminds them of their safari adventure with us, but adds a unique and stylish touch of Africa to their homes. A range of collectable sculptures, home-ware and furnishings will allow you to recreate ‘the safari dream’ within your own home. Find out more on the blog.

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Field Guide Favourites: Best of 2013

January 28, 2014 - Africa, Conservation, Environment, Experience, Safari, Wildlife

The African continent is captivating for many reasons; exotic landscapes, diverse cultures and astounding natural beauty among them. A rich and varied wildlife population is no doubt the highlight for many visitors to Africa, with many unique and mysterious species inhabiting our jungles and grasslands. It is critical that the bio-diversity of this land is protected and conserved, which is why Singita’s core vision is to preserve large tracts of wilderness in Africa for future generations with hands-on conservation teams on each property.

The experienced and highly-skilled Singita field guides play a critical role in this process by educating guests about the importance of conservation and instilling in them a deep sense of appreciation for our natural environment. Their beautiful photos from twice-daily game drives have become an extremely popular feature of the social media accounts and are an inspiration to all members of the Singita family. Here, they have selected their favourites from 2013 for you to enjoy:

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

Best wildlife photos of 2013 | Singita

bestof2013new_11

Catch up on our monthly Wildlife Reports and like our Facebook page for first-hand ranger reports straight from the bushveld.

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Cocktails at the Watering Hole: The Singita Sunrise

January 24, 2014 - Experience

Cocktails in the bush | Singita

A poolside aperitif is the perfect way to end a sweltering summer’s day in the bush. Returning from an evening game drive, you are met by the glow of the hurricane lamps dotting the wooden deck, as their reflection glistens on the water. The gentle clink of ice in your glass is accompanied by the singing of crickets and the distant grunting of a lion rising from his daytime slumber.

Cocktails in the bush | Singita

One of our most popular cocktails is the Singita Sunrise, a rebranded version of the classic tequila-based drink.

Ingredients – what you need:
45ml (3 parts) tequila
90ml (6 parts) orange juice
15ml (1 part) Grenadine syrup
Orange slice and a cherry to garnish

Method – what to do:
Pour the tequila and orange juice into glass over ice.
Add the grenadine, which will sink to the bottom.
Do not stir. Garnish and serve.

Singita Faru Faru Lodge, Tanzania

Why not make your own Singita Sunrise this weekend? Share your photos with us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and tag them with #singitasunrise.

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Architecture & Inspiration: An interview with Singita architect Sally Tsiliyiannis

January 20, 2014 - Accommodation, Experience, Lodges and Camps, Sabi Sand, Singita Castleton

Singita Castleton

Singita Castleton

Formerly the family home of Singita founder Luke Bailes’ grandfather, Singita Castleton is an exclusive-use lodge that has recently been transformed into a charming hideaway catering specifically to groups and families. The property comprises a stone-walled ‘homestead’ and a series of beautifully appointed, air-conditioned double en-suite cottages, offering a unique, private villa experience in the heart of the bush.

Singita Castleton

Set within 45,000 acres of private reserve, Singita Castleton has been designed to combine the best elements of a private safari lodge with the rustic charms of a country farmhouse, with the added benefit of extensive high-end facilities, including a vast garden, swimming pool, wine cellar, gym, tennis court and spa treatment room. Guests can relax together in the courtyard, gather around the traditional ‘boma’ or meet in the country-style kitchen, yet the individual cottages allow guests to retreat to the privacy of their own space as and when it’s needed.

Singita Castleton

Architect Sally Tsiliyiannis, who is a director of the Cape Town office of GAPP Architects & Urban Designers, had the task of overseeing the painstaking restoration of the main homestead, and recently told Men’s Journal USA about the experience:

MJ: When you are working on a safari lodge, how do you make it luxurious without allowing the buildings to overwhelm their setting?
ST: The trick is to let the surroundings be in control – the luxury is already there. Ultimately it’s about making the most ordinary things seem extraordinary and, of course, throwing in all the creature comforts that guests expect.

Singita Castleton

MJ: What styles and touches do you view as uniquely African and thus worth preserving at Singita Castleton?
ST: The existing camp was steeped in history and much loved by many. Although the  existing buildings were actually quite ordinary (simple thatched cottages with small windows, screeded floors and earth coloured plastered walls), we realised the importance of retaining the essence of the place in the redesign. The key to the transformation was the opening up of spaces within and between the buildings and the introduction of new layers of texture and material to blend the buildings more subtly into the landscape. Letting in more natural light helped align the spaces closer with nature.

Singita Castleton

MJ: Which animals are the hardest to keep off the property?
ST: Elephants are the most destructive and have to be kept out of the camp – otherwise pretty much anything can wander in. Monkeys are very mischievous but their antics are irresistible.

Singita Castleton

MJ: What draws you to working in the bush?  
ST: Mostly being outside with the smell of the air and the African sun. Flying low over the bush, site meetings under the trees while elephants take mud baths nearby, the genuine, unpretentious people and the glory of the night sky.

Singita Castleton

MJ: What are the limitations of working in the bush?
ST: The bush is the most extraordinary source of inspiration so there is never a sense of there being ‘limitations’. Things just happen at a slower pace because of logistical challenges so time is inevitably in short supply.

MJ: Are there any great examples of African architecture you draw on for inspiration?
ST: The greatest architecture in Africa is the trees – I constantly use them as a source of inspiration.

You can read all about Singita Castleton’s reopening earlier this year, and see more photos of this gorgeous exclusive-use retreat on our website.

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Breakfast in the Bush: A recipe for Strawberry Jam

January 17, 2014 - Cuisine, Singita Lebombo Lodge

Homemade strawberry jam | Singita Lebombo Lodge

Summer is in full swing here in Southern Africa, which means the kitchen gardens are bursting with sun-ripened fruit. Our berry crop this year is especially good, as the plants are laden with juicy-looking blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. One of the best ways to preserve ripe fruit for use throughout the year is to make homemade jam, which Christien van der Westhuizen, the pastry chef at Singita Lebombo Lodge, serves with freshly-baked bread and cold farm butter. Guests can enjoy this simple but delicious breakfast with a steaming cup of fresh coffee on early morning game drives:

Freshly baked bread | Singita Lebombo Lodge

Ingredients – what you need:
1kg strawberries
Juice and zest of 1 lemon
2 cups sugar

Method – what to do:
1. Combine the sugar, lemon zest and lemon juice in a medium-sized pot and cook over very low heat, until the sugar is dissolved.
2. Add the strawberries and continue to cook over very low heat for 20 minutes, until the strawberries release some of their juices and the mixture boils slowly.
3. Cook until a small amount of the juice gels on a very cold plate (you can pop the plate in the freezer for this).
4. Pour carefully into your preferred canning jar(s) and either hermetically seal to store at room temperature or keep refrigerated if you plan to use it straight away.

Don’t forget to wash and sterilise jars and lids (find out how) and follow these handy tips for storing homemade preserves. You can find plenty more recipes from our creative kitchen teams in the Cuisine section of the blog.

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The Perfect Family Safari with Singita

January 08, 2014 - Accommodation, Did You Know?, Experience, Safari

The untamed wilderness and magnificent wildlife of Africa is a truly life changing experience no matter one’s age. A safari makes for an unforgettable family holiday, with exhilarating activities for the entire family to enjoy, memories made together that will last a lifetime, and opportunities to learn and grow together. As the new year begins and you start to plan vacations to take in 2014, you may find that a safari is the ultimate family adventure.

Family Safari at Singita

Historically, a safari was considered to be a trip of a lifetime or a holiday reserved for older people – the baby boomer generation – and child-free travellers. Modern safari-goers now include dual-income younger parents who want to spend their hard-earned vacations with their children, rather than choosing luxury resorts with kids clubs attached. A family safari is a great shared adventure with the potential to strengthen family bonds and create lifelong memories. For some families, it’s also a chance to unplug from the digital world and be immersed in nature for a while. Whether learning how to track and identifying animals or how to spot the Southern Cross in the night sky, going on safari is a unique experience far removed from the demands and distractions of urban life. In the bush, routine and rules are dictated by the realities of sharing space with wild animals and the necessary precautions attached to this. Children’s eyes are opened to a completely different world filled with experiences they could never have at home.

Family Safari at Singita

A shared morning game drive may include a stop to learn more about tracking followed later by a relaxed bush breakfast to allow everyone to stretch their legs. Afterwards, the energetic can walk back to camp with the guide while the tracker drives the rest of the party back to the lodge. Game drives and mealtimes offer plenty of scope for togetherness, but there’s also time to be independent and retreat into the luxury and solitude of your suite.

Family Safari at Singita

Multi-generational parties wanting additional privacy and flexibility are booking Singita’s exclusive-use lodges or camps, such as Singita Castleton (South Africa), Singita Serengeti House (Tanzania), and Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camps (Tanzania), set up in prime locations in the Grumeti reserve. For parents travelling with their children, there are special two-bedroomed family suites at Singita Boulders and Ebony Lodges (South Africa) and Singita Faru Faru Lodge (Tanzania). With bigger families or teens, the villa accommodation at Singita Sasakwa Lodge (Tanzania) and Singita Pamushana Lodge (Zimbabwe) is ideal.

Family Safari at Singita

Singita’s approach to family safaris is to steer clear of set, cookie-cutter programs. Instead, fluid itineraries are planned around each family for the duration of their stay, taking into consideration the age of the children and any special interests or requests. “Our guests are well travelled and their children are accustomed to privilege and opportunity wherever they go,” says Mark Broodryk, Singita Sabi Sand’s head guide. “We try shift the focus away from physical ‘stuff’ and highlight the intangible aspects of being here, such as learning a new skill or notching up an exciting experience that will earn them bragging rights with their friends. It’s not about what you have when you are in the bush, but what you know to ensure your survival.”

Family Safari at Singita

Children are welcomed with an age-appropriate survival kit that includes a water bottle and sunscreen – essential items that come with a mother’s stamp of approval rather than an expensive price tag. They are also given a small satchel with Velcro tabs to which they are encouraged to attach badges earned for skills in tracking, fishing, birding, astronomy, botany, survival in the bush and many other activities. These badges are linked to the popular Singita Mini Rangers’ Course (South Africa and Zimbabwe) or Watoto Pori Singita Training Course (Tanzania), which can be extended or edited to suit the length of a family’s stay. These courses cover tracking animals; frogging; butterfly capture and release; astronomy; bush survival techniques; flower-pressing; game-spotting competitions; nature quizzes and a guide’s test. Teens are challenged in different ways, for example getting their hands dirty by helping to plant trees at community schools. Learning basic survival skills, like how to make a fire, find a water source or identify edible plants with medicinal uses, holds universal appeal regardless of age.

Family Safari at Singita

Every aspect of a Singita family safari is individualised, from the most suitable accommodation to meal times and what’s on the menu. It’s a philosophy based on welcoming families, rather than tolerating them. All the lodges have swimming pools, while most also offer tennis, archery and fishing. At Singita Grumeti, capable riders can experience the thrill of a horseback safari. Families who show an interest in community initiatives and education often enjoy visiting local communities, especially the schools. This is another opportunity for parents to expose their children to the realities of life beyond their own privileged existence, while planting seeds of awareness and understanding about other cultures.

Family Safari at Singita

Eating well is central to a memorable safari, especially when taking children into consideration. Thoughtfully put-together snack boxes accompany children on every game drive, providing both diversion and sustenance. In the evening, while parents enjoy an elegant multi-course menu paired to wines from Singita’s extensive cellar, children may request their own mini tasting menu where the emphasis is on fun plating and their favourite flavours. Families also enjoy Singita’s ‘family feast’ style of dining where communal platters of food – roast chicken and a variety of fresh salads, for example – are brought to the table at the same time so that hungry children can eat quickly while the rest of the family settles into a relaxed, sociable meal. The chefs at each lodge are well versed at adapting menus to suit children or meeting special requests for homemade burgers or rolling out dough to bake their own pizzas.

Family Safari at Singita

There are numerous benefits to taking children on safari, not least the unique learning opportunities. In turn, Singita values the opportunity to engage with young people and teach these future decision makers and custodians of the planet about the significance and interconnection of conservation, communities and the low-impact, high-yield model of ecotourism that has proved to be successful in Africa.

Family Safari at Singita

To find out more about family safaris at Singita, please complete our enquiry form and one of our reservations consultants will make contact to assist you with availability and help you to plan your trip.

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