The Singita Blog

Cocktail Recipe: Blueberry Gin Royale

March 19, 2015 - Cuisine, Experience, Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Singita Sasakwa Lodge, Tanzania

Perched atop a gently sloping hill in northern Tanzania, with a breathtaking view across the Serengeti plains, lies a turn-of-the-century stone manor house with a sweeping veranda that leads down to a lush, rolling lawn. This is Singita Sasakwa Lodge; an elegant property that harks back to the safari splendour of yesteryear.

Singita Sasakwa Lodge

From Sasakwa Hill, the eye is irresistibly drawn over the endless grasslands and acacia forests below, to the blue mountains in the distant horizon. Year-round, the area boasts an abundance of game and it is a very special experience to watch the animals scattered across the wide plains, or witness the spectacle of a rainbow after a welcome shower of rain.

Singita Sasakwa Lodge, Tanzania

Singita Sasakwa Lodge holds special appeal for those with a passion for refined luxury, ensconcing its guests in comfort, charm and old-world sophistication. The food and beverage menu at the lodge reflects this, and traditional cooking methods are approached with a classic but experimental attitude. One such example is the Blueberry Gin Royale – a fruity, refreshing twist on the more typical Sloe Royale. This cocktail epitomises the regal opulence of the classically beautiful Singita Sasakwa Lodge.

Blueberry Gin Royale | Singita Sasakwa Lodge

BLUEBERRY GIN ROYALE

Ingredients – what you will need:
1 cup blueberries + extra for garnish
1 cup water
1 cup sugar
1 bottle of sparkling wine
½ cup gin
4 long sprigs of thyme
1 cup ice

Method – what to do:
1. In a small saucepan, bring the blueberries, water and sugar to a boil
2. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes, until the blueberries are soft and the simple syrup has turned to a bright pink colour
3. Remove from the heat then drain the blueberries and allow to cool
4. In a cocktail shaker, add the ice and gin and shake until the gin is ice cold
5. Divide the gin between the four Champagne flutes and add 1 tablespoon of blueberry syrup to each glass
6. Slowly pour the sparkling wine down the side of the glass until it is ¾ full
7. Garnish with fresh blueberries and a sprig of thyme

Makes 4 servings

Singita Sasakwa Lodge is one of five lodges and camps in Singita Grumeti, situated adjacent to the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. The region forms an integral part of the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem, the home of the Great Migration and excellent year-round game viewing. Learn more about the area on our website or watch this video to see its incredible beauty for yourself.

Read More


The Greatest Show on Earth Has Begun!

March 13, 2015 - Experience, Safari, Singita Grumeti, Wildlife

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

Every year, roughly three million plains game traverse the Serengeti in the Great Migration; a spectacular wildlife phenomenon that is affectionately known as the Greatest Show on Earth. The animals typically arrive in Singita Grumeti around May, as the herds move northwest towards Kenya.

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

Recent reports from the area indicate a very early migration, as a portion of the wildebeest, zebra and antelope has already arrived. Large herds of wildebeest were first spotted crossing the Grumeti River onto the property last week, and were initially thought to be “strays” who had broken away from the bulk. It only took a few short days however, with thousands more pouring in, for the plains of Sasakwa and Nyati to be overrun by close to 100 000 wildebeest.

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

Adding to the fun are the younger calves traipsing alongside their mothers. These calves would usually already be three months old by the time they reached these parts of the Serengeti, as the animals spend the first months of the year on the short grass plains of the southeastern part of the ecosystem where they birth their young.

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

It is speculated that the early migration can be attributed to the dry weather experienced in the southern and central Serengeti this year. The herds have been forced to travel two months ahead of schedule, in order to find fresh grazing – a clear sign of their agility in reacting to environmental conditions. The herds will need to continue on their flexible schedule as there have been no major rainstorms in Singita Grumeti since February, which means that the herd is expected to move on shortly.

The Great Migration 2015 | Singita Grumeti

Subscribe to our RSS feed for the latest news about the migration. You can also see the latest photos on our Facebook page and Instagram feed, as our field guides post there regularly, direct from the bush.

Read More


Neighbour Outreach Programme at Singita Pamushana Lodge

March 13, 2015 - Community Development, Did You Know?, Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, Singita Pamushana Lodge

As part of its ongoing commitment to the local community, Singita Pamushana Lodge provides support across a broad spectrum of projects through the Malilangwe Trust, its non-profit development and conservation partner.

Neighbour Outreach Programme | Singita Pamushana Lodge

The Neighbour Outreach Programme (NOP) includes a Supplementary Feeding Programme for children up to school age, support for local primary schools and cultural projects which include the fostering of traditional tribal dance at a young age.

Neighbour Outreach Programme | Singita Pamushana Lodge

The Supplementary Feeding Programme began in February 2003 when, after two years of severe drought, Singita responded to the government’s call for assistance. “At that time, many local children were severely malnourished,” says Shepherd Mawire, NOP Project Co-ordinator. “But the programme has since provided additional food and nourishment to thousands of children in the local communities.”

Neighbour Outreach Programme | Singita Pamushana Lodge

Every day 19 000 children (mostly aged 5 years and younger) are provided with a nutrient rich soya-corn blend. The ingredients are delivered to 436 feeding points and 11 primary schools which are managed by volunteers appointed by the local communities to oversee this core village activity.

Neighbour Outreach Programme | Singita Pamushana Lodge

The programme not only provides much needed nutrition, but also helps the children realise their educational and developmental potential by ensuring that hunger does not get in the way of their ability to concentrate and learn during the school day.

Neighbour Outreach Programme | Singita Pamushana Lodge

The NOP also supports the local primary schools in the form of much-needed extra stationery and books while working with the community on other projects agreed with them. A pilot scheme that will provide honey from bee-hives has been launched and there are five kitchen garden irrigation schemes growing nutritious, fresh vegetables which are otherwise in short supply.

One of the NOP’s most important cultural initiatives is in providing musical instruments, costumes and regalia for the primary school children who compete in the national tribal dance competitions held annually in August.

Sarah Madden | Singita Pamushana Lodge

Sarah Madden asked more about the motives behind the programme – “We want the children to learn about their Shangaan cultural roots,” says Shepherd. “We want the cultural soul to survive into the next generation and to do that we need to start at the grass-roots primary school level. We want the children to know that despite our modern technological world, this was how it was done in the past. It’s all part of our mission to empower and support the local community.”

WATCH THE VIDEO

Richard and Sarah Madden are freelance travel writers and filmmakers. Richard has written for the Daily Telegraph (UK) for more then 20 years and met Sarah while presenting documentaries for the Discovery Channel which were produced by Sarah. Prior to working with Singita, the couple spent two years in Africa writing and filming the multi-media Bush Telegraph column for the Daily Telegraph. The column includes reports on safaris, wildlife conservation and community stories from all over southern and eastern Africa.

You can read their previous report from Singita Malilangwe here.

This film was shot on a Leica V-Lux (www.leica-camera.com)

Read More


16 Years Hosting Veterinarians Wildlife Course

March 10, 2015 - General

Singita Pamushana Lodge located on the 130,000-acre Malilangwe Reserve, partners with the Malilangwe Trust, every year to co-host an internationally renowned course on Chemical and Physical Restraint of African Wildlife.  The course originated in Zimbabwe more than 30 years ago when the Government Veterinary Service (GVS) was asked to assist in the training of National Parks personnel in safe wild animal capture.

Vets course

It is the culmination of ideas, knowledge, and experience gained over the last three decades and is designed to benefit both the wildlife industry in southern Africa as well as other professionals from around the world working with captive or free-ranging wild animals. This is the 16th year the 10-day course has taken place and this year included students from 17 different countries.  The objective is to educate wildlife health and management professionals in the science and art of wildlife capture. These skills can be of huge benefit in the preservation of wildlife populations all over the world.

Whether it be a rhino in Africa or a snow leopard in Asia, threatened or endangered species cannot be effectively managed without the occasional intervention. This can be for health reasons, the fitting and removal of GPS tracking technology, or even relocation into areas where numbers are low or a species has disappeared altogether. The course teaches the relevant wild animal capture skills to achieve all these.

Giraffe

Participants obtain a wealth of both theoretical and hands-on practical experience unavailable on equivalent courses. The field aspects are conducted in a wild and free-roaming environment, so safety is paramount.  A key feature is the wide range of local, regional and international lecturers and wildlife managers that assist in teaching both theoretical and field aspects of safe wildlife capture. All are leaders in their individual fields and include veterinarians and pathologists, managers and researchers, game capturers and helicopter pilots.

The course integrates a variety of topics including legislation, theoretical and applied pharmacology, theoretical and applied physiology, stress and capture-related conditions, safety and first aid in the field, use of helicopters, ethical principles, chemical immobilisation and species requirements, drug injecting equipment, dart projectors, ancillary treatments in wildlife capture, transport of wild animals and post-mortem techniques.

Courese

The CPRWA course is run by the Zimbabwe Wildlife Veterinary Trust and Wildlife Capture Africa headed by Dr. Chap Masterson in conjunction with the Malilangwe Trust (www.wildlifecaptureafrica.com).

Richard and Sarah Madden are freelance travel writers and filmmakers. Richard has written for the Daily Telegraph (UK) for more then 20 years and met Sarah while presenting documentaries for the Discovery Channel which were produced by Sarah. Prior to working with Singita, the couple spent 18 months in Africa writing and filming the multi-media Bush Telegraph column for the Daily Telegraph. The column includes reports on safaris, wildlife conservation and community stories from all over southern and eastern Africa.

Richard and Sarah Madden resized

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE

This film was mostly shot on a Leica V-Lux (www.leica-camera.com). For invaluable additional footage, huge thanks to Josh Mostert, Wildlife Capture Africa.

Read More


Art on a Plate: Food Design at Singita Grumeti & Singita Lamai

March 03, 2015 - Cuisine, Experience, Lodges and Camps, Singita Explore, Singita Faru Faru Lodge, Singita Grumeti, Singita Mara River Tented Camp, Singita Sabora Tented Camp, Singita Sasakwa Lodge, Singita Serengeti House

Singita has six different camps and lodges in Tanzania with a common design philosophy but each with a unique style which is complemented by the food design. From the cool neutral palette of Singita Serengeti House and contemporary, organic style of Singita Faru Faru Lodge to the nostalgic tented interiors of Singita Explore, the food at each property reflects the aesthetic of its location.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Keeping all of these food styles in mind, we pride ourselves on serving only the best quality food and try to make each dining experience the best possible. The remote and relatively isolated nature of the Grumeti Reserves poses a considerable challenge to our chefs but with some imagination and ingenuity, every plate is a sensory delight. Executive Chef Frank Louw describes how these plates differ from lodge to lodge:

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Singita Sasakwa Lodge
The turn-of-the-century manor house and private cottages are decorated with a blend of authentic European style and East African influences. This translates to a classic and sophisticated approach to food, without complicating the plating or style of the dishes. Traditional cooking methods are given a new approach by experimenting with texture, feel and taste. Daily pickings from the kitchen garden and local ingredients are showcased on our daily menus.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Singita Sabora Tented Camp
The intimate 1920s-style explorer’s camp is permeated by a sense of sentimental adventure. At Singita Sabora Tented Camp we try to keep the style of food uncomplicated, designing elegant menus that feature old-time favourites given a stylish twist. Guests can also choose to sample dishes from a special Swahili menu to experience the local cuisine. Copper, silver and crystal bowls are used to set the perfect dining scene.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Singita Faru Faru Lodge
This contemporary riverine lodge lends itself to a modern elegant cuisine without any unnecessary complications. Fresh, healthy and vibrant are just some of the words that best describe the food served here, that reflects a sense of “barefoot elegance”. With a true island feel, the kitchen at Singita Faru Faru Lodge also makes use of wonderful Zanzibari flavours and oceanic offerings, including fresh seafood and vibrant spices.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Singita Explore
Singita Explore, always on the move, offers wholesome, hearty food with a campfire ambiance; the smoky aromas capturing the essence of nature. Fires are a priority at every meal, and thus, be it breakfast, lunch or dinner nearly all the food on the menu is prepared on the open fire. The unique experience and flavours that result from this cooking method is one of the things that makes this mobile camp so unique.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Singita Mara River Tented Camp
Laid-back luxury and bohemian glamour is at the heart of this incredible eco-lodge build at the northern-most tip of the Serengeti National Park. Along with everything else at the camp, power for the kitchen is generated by a custom designed solar system and operates entirely “off the grid”. This sensitivity is extended to the food that is prepared here so that guests enjoy a balanced menu offering modern bistro fare made with plenty of local produce.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Singita Serengeti House
There is only one way to describe the feeling of stepping into this exclusive-use retreat: Home away from home. The property is specifically designed to welcome families and friends and create an environment of total relaxation for a carefree stay. The food is therefore simple and homely, and the meals are shared together at the table. Wholesome, family-style food is prepared by your own private chef which offers guests even more flexibility, as they are able to collaborate on a menu to suit every palate.

Food at Singita's lodges in Tanzania

Our chefs work closely with local farmers to grow everything from potatoes to passion fruit for use in the kitchens, and in so doing supporting the nearby communities and helping these suppliers to expand their businesses. We also run a dedicated training programme at the Singita School of Cooking to teach culinary skills to the local youth. You can find out more about Singita’s community projects here.

Read More


Fascinating Flora: The Leadwood Tree

February 25, 2015 - Did You Know?, Environment, Kruger National Park, Singita Lebombo Lodge, Singita Sweni Lodge

There is a classic, if slightly ominous, African image with which you’re probably familiar; it’s the scene of a colony of vultures huddled on the branches of a leafless leadwood tree, black rain clouds looming overhead. It is, in fact, a fairly common sight at Singita’s South African properties (albeit with more blue sky!), where the bush is studded with tall leadwoods that live up to their scientific name; combretum imberbe, meaning “hairless climber”.

Leaded trees at Singita Kruger National Park

The leadwood is one of the largest trees in Africa, and is so called because of the wood which is extremely dense and heavy. As such, it is impermeable to termites and is one of the only wood species that sinks when thrown into water. It’s hardiness also explains why, up to 80 years after a leadwood tree has died, its imposing skeleton will remain intact, and why it used to be the material of choice for railway sleepers. The species is protected in South Africa, although fallen branches and those left behind by marauding elephants are allowed to be used for furniture or ornamental work.

Leaded trees at Singita Kruger National Park

Although slow-growing, they can live to be thousands of years old and flourish in alluvial soil along river beds, like the Sweni and N’wanetsi Rivers that run through Singita Kruger National Park. The leaves are popular with herbivores and you will regularly see elephant, giraffe, kudu and impala munching on them during a game drive.

Leopard in a leadwood tree | All Dolled Up

Singita’s 33,000-acre private concession in the Kruger National Park is home to two of our lodges; Singita Lebombo Lodge and Singita Sweni Lodge. This area is especially well-known for the remarkable concentration of the ‘Big 5’ and four particularly formidable prides of lions. Discover more on our website.

Read More


Experience the Serengeti: Setting up Singita Explore

February 19, 2015 - Did You Know?, Experience, Lodges and Camps, Safari, Singita Explore, Singita Grumeti

“Endless” is a word that is often used to describe the Serengeti. The apparent infinity of its grassy plains, acacia woodlands and riverine forests is a stunning sight, the memory of which never leaves those who have seen it in person. These boundless landscapes are the first thing to greet guests every morning at Singita Explore, as the rising sun casts light on 350,000 acres of untouched wilderness.

Singita Explore, Serengeti, Tanzania

Each camp is strategically located and moved throughout the year in order to give guests the best opportunity of experiencing this vast and unique ecosystem. Visitors to the region are treated to unrivalled sightings of high concentrations of game at any time of year, including the renowned annual wildebeest migration which passes right through the concession.

Singita Explore, Serengeti, Tanzania

This delightful video gives the viewer an authentic sense of the experience, and takes you behind the scenes to see how the camp at Singita Explore comes to life, narrated by some of the special people who make it all happen:

Singita Explore is a private use camp in northern Tanzania. It is particularly appealing to those in search of an opportunity to connect up-close with the earth and wildlife in a way they have never done before. With a private guide, chef, camp host and camp staff, activities can be arranged on a whim, game drives may be as long or as short as you choose and intimate experiences await. Please explore our website or contact our Reservations team to find out more.

Read More


2015 – A Great Year for Family Travel

February 14, 2015 - Accommodation, Experience, Lodges and Camps

Singita Castleton Family Safari

Singita is the ultimate destination for a family vacation, with 12 diverse lodges and camps scattered across South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. It is an experience for young and old, who will enjoy interacting with the local flora and fauna, and connecting with local communities.

Singita Castelton (game drive)-1-41

Family safari at Singita

Trend No. 1: Multi-Generational Family Travel
The market for “baby boomers” traveling with their families (grandparents with their children and grandchildren) grew 30% in the past year. Singita’s lodges and camps offer various accommodation solutions for such groups, including a number of private villas, family suites, and exclusive use options.

family_11

Giraffes on the Serengeti | Singita Grumeti

Trend No. 2: Active Eco-Tourism
There has been a substantial shift for eco-conscious guests, who are now looking to participate more actively in the preservation of our planet. A visit to Singita allows visiting families to get an intimate look at meaningful projects that are directly impacting the preservation of pristine African wilderness. They are also able to learn about the importance of sustainable practices and see how our dedicated teams protect, maintain and enhance the land and its environment.

Family travel trends 2015

Family safari at Singita

Trend No. 3: Total Immersion
Intrepid travellers are looking for a complete experience; to live the adventure on every level. Visitors to Singita Mara River Tented Camp, which operates “off the grid”, are able to embrace the outdoors and connect directly with nature. Families can visit local community programs or take a class alongside students at the Singita School of Cooking, while the very popular Singita Mini Rangers Course opens up a whole new world to young explorers.

Family safari at Singita

Trend No. 4: Private Villas
The popularity of traditional rooms for families and groups is being eclipsed by the convenience and luxury of private villas. Singita offers just such an experience at multiple locations, including Singita Castleton, a converted farmhouse in South Africa, the tranquil Singita Serengeti House in Tanzania, and Singita Explore, an entire private-use camp set up on the plains of the Serengeti.

family_13

The untamed wilderness and magnificent wildlife of Africa is a truly life changing experience no matter one’s age. A safari makes for an unforgettable family holiday, with exhilarating activities for the entire family to enjoy, memories made together that will last a lifetime, and opportunities to learn and grow together. You can check availability at all of our lodges and camps online or contact our Reservations team to find out more.

Read More


Daily Diary: Singita Grumeti Horseback Safari

February 09, 2015 - Experience, Safari, Singita Explore, Singita Faru Faru Lodge, Singita Grumeti, Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Horsback Safari at Singita Grumeti

The rumble of hooves across the Serengeti isn’t always the result of millions of animals moving across the plains during the annual migration; often it is our guests enjoying an outride from the stables at The Singita Equestrian Centre. The horseback safari at Singita Grumeti is an unrivalled adventure that combines long rides exploring remote areas of more than 350,000 acres of exclusive use concession with wonderfully relaxing afternoons. In this series of diary entries, Equestrian Manager Alison Mundy documents a few days taking guests on a journey of exploration to some of the Reserve’s most remote and romantic sites.

Horsback Safari at Singita Grumeti

DAY ONE
We headed out from Singita Sasakwa Lodge across the wide open plains that were teeming with wildlife after the early rains. Cantering with thousand of wildebeest and zebra was one of the highlights of today’s ride; the thrill of being at one with the herds is almost indescribable. Animals racing all around you, the thundering of thousands of hooves, the barking of the zebras and the “gnuuing” of the wildebeest rang in our ears.

Horsback Safari at Singita Grumeti

Twenty minutes from camp we heard the ominous growl of an approaching thunder storm as the big, black clouds rolled in over the Serengeti. The clouds burst a short time later and the brief but torrential downpour left us all drenched but thankfully much cooler. A light rain continued though the afternoon and pre-dinner drinks were much enjoyed sitting around the camp fire under umbrellas while retelling the day’s adventures.

Singita Grumeti, Tanzania

DAY TWO
What a start to the day! The morning was heralded with a spectacular sunrise behind Bangwezi Hill while we had our breakfast, but it was soon interrupted by the spotting of what appeared to be some cheetah playing on the edge of the camp. Upon closer inspection we saw that it was a mother with her three cubs in the process of stalking a male reedbuck. After that bit of excitement we headed off on the horses to see what other adventures we could find.

Singita Grumeti, Tanzania

Not long after leaving camp we came across a journey of approximately 20 giraffes, some eland and a small herd of zebra. With the wide open plains stretching out all around us we started to canter alongside the giraffe. They were very obliging and started to run alongside the horses for about 500m – what a magical memory to take away of these gentle giants running in slow motion meters away from your horse! Other game spotting throughout the day included a close encounter with a hyena and a herd of over a hundred elephants.

Horsback Safari at Singita Grumeti

DAY THREE
After exploring the Lion Rocks yesterday, we headed off towards Monchuli Hill this morning, mingling with more herds of zebra and giraffe along the way. The terrain today was more varied with open plains leading into areas that looked like large manicured parks dotted with with marula and apple leaf trees, following into acacia woodland and then onto more open plains.

Horsback Safari at Singita Grumeti

Some mountaineering was required to cross a saddle between two hills while being watched by a troop of baboons. Manyara and Koroya had a couple of races on the open plains to see who was the fastest with Manyara surprising us all with a real burst of speed to beat Koroya by a length! Returning to camp we came across a large herd of curious buffalo who entertained us for some time, coming closer to the horses and then running away. Another delicious lunch accompanied by some hilarious stories and much laughter took up a couple of hours, followed by an afternoon wildlife walk.

Horsback Safari at Singita Grumeti

Combine Singita Explore for a truly immersive bush adventure with a stay at Singita Sasakwa Lodge or Singita Faru Faru Lodge for the ultimate Serengeti horseback experience. Non-riders in a party are welcome and will be offered game drives plus all the facilities of the lodges. Equestrian safaris are available from 01 June – 31 October. Get in touch with our Reservations team to find out more.

Read More


Top 10 Most Liked Photos on Instagram

February 02, 2015 - Experience, Wildlife

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

1. He’s done it again… The amazing field guide and wildlife photographer that is Ross Couper captures the most wonderful leopard mother/cub image at Singita – quite brilliant (Jan 2015)

This leopard mother and cub photo by field guide and photographer Ross Couper, posted on Friday afternoon, quickly became the most ‘liked’ image on Singita’s Instagram page. Ross is also responsible for the second most popular image from @Singita_; the equally remarkable lion pride parade pictured below.

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

2. Beat that for a group photo! Field guide Ross Couper at Singita Sabi Sand says: “As the honey coloured morning light filtered through the mist on the horizon, we knew we were in for a very good morning…” (May 2014)

The photograph was so popular that we thought you might like to see the rest of the Top 10 most ‘liked’ images from the past 18 months. Leopards are the subject of three of the photographs but are outweighed, so to speak, by shots of elephants; they feature four times. The early morning lion patrol, an affectionate baby rhino and some very fluffy cheetahs also make it onto the list. We hope that you enjoy these wonderful images from our very special corner of the world:

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

3. Rather superb photo via @margauxknuppe of three elephants lining up for a group shot at the hide in Singita Pamushana Lodge (Oct 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

4. Heartwarming shot of a cheetah and cub captured by guide Alfred Ngwarai at Singita Grumeti. (Sept 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

5. Magnificent shot of the Ravenscourt female leopard and youngster by @jonobuffey, who captured ‘The Look’ at Singita Sabi Sand (Oct 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

6. This is an extraordinarily powerful photo, taken by Hilary O’Leary. She works for the equestrian program at Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve – 130,000 acres of wilderness in Zimbabwe, in which Singita Pamushana is located. Her photo is of a baby black rhino nudging a scout with his rifle. The image is made even more pertinent by the fact that only 750 rhinos still survive in the country, according to the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Authority. (Feb 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

7. Two of our most valued guests at Singita Pamushana Lodge. (Sept 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

8. So you just settle down post-lunch and think about a dip when along comes a herd of 30 elephants for a drink at the bar. Or, in this case, the pool. Nothing for it but to grab a camera, as Singita Serengeti House guest, Evan Visconti, did. (Aug 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

9. View from the comfy seats, as seen by @fatmalfalasi at Singita Boulders Lodge. Put yourself in her seat… (Jul 2014)

Top 10 most liked photos on Instagram

10. Powerful leopard kill image from field guide Barry Peiser at Singita Kruger National Park (Oct 2014)

For more spectacular photographs from Singita’s lodges and camps, join the roughly 5,300 other Instagram followers on our account. Our guests can also tag their own photos with #OurSingita, so that they may appear on our digital scrapbook – visit the page to share in their Singita experiences.

Read More


Sign up to receive the Singita newsletter

×