Category Archives: Wildlife

Grassland Giants

November 20, 2015 - Lodges and Camps,Singita Grumeti,Sustainable Conservation,The Grumeti Fund,Wildlife

Singita Grumeti, situated adjacent to the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, is an integral part of the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem. Singita manages the concession on behalf of the non-profit Grumeti Community and Wildlife Conservation Fund, and is responsible for the long-term sustainability of the reserve. Elephants, the gentle giants of the grasslands, form an essential part of this ecosystem. Here field guide Ross Couper tells us more:

Elephants in the Serengeti - Singita Grumeti

Topographically, the Grumeti region comprises flat undulating grassy plains interrupted by scattered rocky areas, known as kopjies. Apart from the millions of blue wildebeest and several thousand zebra that move across the Serengeti grasslands every year, there are also several species that do not migrate.

Elephants in the Serengeti - Singita Grumeti

Elephants dwarf the other species in the region and, given the rich biodiversity in the Grumeti area, do not compete for food with the grazing herds. These lumbering giants are often described as highly emotional and demonstrate a significant level of intelligence. One such example is the way in which they have been known to treat elephant carcasses, showing an interest in retrieving the tusks and bones. This behaviour has been noted as a way of grieving a companion when they have passed on. This emotional connection is also apparent in the way in which elephants show concern for their family members, in particular the young calves within the herds.

Elephants in the Serengeti - Singita Grumeti

Elephants in the Serengeti - Singita Grumeti

As a keystone species in the Serengeti – animals whose behaviour allows for other species to thrive and contributes to the biodiversity of an area – elephants help to naturally conserve their own habitat. They stop the progression of grassland into forest or woodland, thereby providing plenty of feed for the migrating mammals. By uprooting woody plants that spout among the grasses (which form the beginnings of a forest), elephants help to manage the life-giving plains, including the throngs of antelope, wildebeest and zebra, and the predators who feed on them. Without the work of these animals, the habitat would change or disappear, completely disrupting the migration and the ecosystem at large. It’s just one of the reasons why looking after Singita Grumeti’s elephant population, and those of all the other species that live there, is a critical part of the conservation process.

Elephants in the Serengeti - Singita Grumeti

Elephants in the Serengeti - Singita Grumeti

A close-up look at elephant hide

Spanning over 350,000 acres of untouched wilderness, Singita Grumeti is home to five of Singita’s 12 lodges and camps, including Singita Explore, a private-use mobile camp that offers guest an intimate and authentic connection with the landscape and its wildlife.

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An African Treasure

November 07, 2015 - Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Singita Pamushana Lodge,Wildlife

Field guide and wildlife photographer Ross Couper was born in Zimbabwe and grew up in the Matopos National Park, so he has a special connection to the country and its fauna and flora. Here he shares his knowledge and memories of the local African Wild Dog population with us:

Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Singita Pamushana Lodge is located within the private Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve in southeastern Zimbabwe, which shares its southern boundary with Gonarezhou National Park. The park’s rich wildlife consists of 500 species of birds, 147 species of mammals, more than 116 species of reptiles, 34 species of frogs and 49 species of fish.

African wild dogs at Singita Pamushana Lodge, Malilangwe, Zimbabwe

Painted Dogs, also known as African Wild Dogs, are unique to Africa and they are among this continent’s most endangered species. It is estimated that less than 7,000 remain in the wild. One of my favourite experiences seeing these animals at Singita Pamushana was one winter’s morning when we drove out past a rocky section of the concession; a piece of land that would make an ideal location for their dens.

African wild dogs at Singita Pamushana Lodge, Malilangwe, Zimbabwe

As the land rover came to stop, above the early morning chorus of several birds, we could hear the distant calls from a hyena. It was a frantic scene; three hyena were moving in various directions, whooping and calling. Suddenly a flash of white appeared amongst the tall grass followed by three or four more – it was the wild dogs’s tails. Before we knew it, several pack members had arrived as if they are reinforcing the movement towards the hyenas. The scavengers beat a hasty retreat and the wild dogs feasted on the unfortunate impala ram that they had hunted earlier.

Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Observing these precious animals in their natural habitat from the comfort of a game viewing vehicle is such a privilege, as is the ability to provide them with a safe, natural habitat in which to flourish. The 130,000-acre reserve was specifically established to conserve and protect this significant wilderness region; something it has done with great success since 1994.

Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

All proceeds from the management of Singita Pamushana Lodge benefit the Malilangwe Trust, and its numerous conservation and community outreach programmes. This Zimbabwean-based and -managed Trust was set up to develop a blueprint for creating harmony between conservation initiatives and community development in villages that neighbour wildlife areas. You can read more about the Trust and Singita’s work in the area on our website.

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Big Cat Country: The Leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

October 21, 2015 - Experience,Sabi Sand,Wildlife

“You can lie out on the bare ground and look like a heap of pebbles. You can lie out on the naked rocks and look like a piece of pudding-stone. You can lie out on a leafy branch and look like sunshine sifting through the leaves; and you can lie right across the centre of a path and look like nothing in particular. Think of that and purr!”

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

This excerpt from Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories is a perfect explanation as to why it can be tricky to spot a leopard while in the bush. They are elusive creatures, but the Sabi Sand Reserve, in which Singita has a 45,000-acre concession, is very well known for its leopard activity. These cats form an important part of the diversity in the area, with Singita guides and trackers becoming familiar with various resident leopards that have established territory near the Sand River.

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

The Ravenscourt male

Females are more common, as adult males venture beyond the local area in order to establish new territories for themselves. There is however one male leopard of some significance, who was orphaned by a “rogue” male two years ago. His mother was the fondly-remembered Ravenscourt female; an incredibly beautiful leopardess who was a familiar sight for visitors to Singita Sabi Sand. Her cub subsequently became independent and moved south, while the “rogue” male has settled in the area and is known as the Nyeleti male leopard; a name that means ‘stars’ in Shangaan.

Singita Ebony Lodge

Singita Ebony Lodge

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

Hlaba’Nkunzi female and her cub

Since losing the Ravenscourt female, Hlaba’Nkunzi, a new female leopard from the western Sabi Sand has taken over her territory and given birth to two litters of cubs. She is an unusually adventurous leopard, and is regularly spotted close to the lodges during the early morning and evening. She even gave birth to her most recent litter under the private pool deck of one of Singita Ebony Lodge‘s suites.

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

Hlaba’Nkunzi’s young male cub

Over the last 10 months, we have been fortunate enough to observe one of these cubs grow up and adopt some of his mother’s habits, including a quiet tolerance of the game vehicles and a sense of comfort around the lodges. This young male is always a popular character to spot during a game drive, and reminds both guests and staff alike how fortunate we are to be in such close proximity to these incredible animals.

The leopards of Singita Sabi Sand

This article is the first in a series of wildlife stories that will showcase the interesting animals found across the five regions in which Singita’s lodges and camps are located. Please subscribe to the blog using the form on the right to ensure that you don’t miss the next one!

You can read more about the Ravenscourt female in this heart-wrenching tribute written by Head Guide, Mark Broodryk, and also see some gorgeous photographs of the first sighting of the Hlaba’Nkunzi cubs.

Special thanks to Ross Couper for the lovely photographs.

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Quick & Quirky: Wildlife Snippets on our Vimeo Channel

October 08, 2015 - Environment,Experience,Wildlife

Have you ever seen an elephant blowing bubbles? Or a very lucky wildebeest escaping the clutches of an apex predator? Or a leopard cub getting a bath from his mother? Singita’s Vimeo channel is a gold mine for wildlife lovers, and is full of great sightings just like those described. Most of the wildlife posts are short snippets filmed by field guides out on game drives with guests, and many contain unusual or exciting animal behaviour.

Leopard at Singita Kruger National Park

Here are some highlights of the most amusing and eye-catching wildlife sightings you can find on our channel:

Lioness vs. Porcupine

Singita Kruger National Park is well known for the large lion prides and ever changing dynamics within the family groups. Over the last few months especially, we have been spoilt with terrific sightings of the prides as they move through the concession and especially the phenomenal array of cubs. This sighting however was completely unique and very entertaining! Two lionesses taking on a porcupine? That is very brave considering the damage that those quills can cause.

A Feast for the Shishangaan Pride

Three adult lionesses with seven cubs from the Shishangaan pride were seen on a few occasions this month. The cubs gorged themselves and could hardly walk to keep up as their mothers led them away from the kill sites after feeding, in order to keep them safe. We also saw a total of thirty-two Shishangaan pride members feeding on the remains of a Cape buffalo a few weeks ago!

Leopard Cub Having a Bath

Singita Sabi Sand is renowned for a healthy leopard population, where guests are treated to daily sightings of these majestic animals. Our guides cam upon this incredible sighting on morning game drive today.

Lucky Gnu (Singita Kruger National Park)

We were lucky enough to witness this gripping encounter between a lone wildebeest and a lioness. Through true determination and possibly a bit of luck this wildebeest managed to fight off the lioness and gallop to freedom. Rare sightings like these are such a privilege to see!

Baby Hippo Going for a Dip (Singita Kruger National Park)

Newly born hippos are relatively small, weighing from 55 to 120 pounds, and are fiercly protected by their mothers. Young hippos can only stay under water for about half a minute, but adults can stay submerged up to six minutes.

Elephants Blowing Bubbles (Singita Sabi Sand)

Anywhere on the concession where there is water, there are elephants. Mid-morning at the water source is generally the best, as the herds come down to drink. There are often very good interactions between the elephants and the crocodiles and hippos wishing to bask in the sun on the riverbanks.

Singita’s social channels are a great place to get the latest news from our 12 lodges and camps. You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and, of course, Vimeo.

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Get to Know Us: Singita’s Female Field Guides

September 25, 2015 - Did You Know?,People of Singita,Wildlife

Singita’s success is built on the collective strength and vision of deeply committed people, all passionate about Africa and linked by a common purpose to protect and preserve the world’s last remaining wilderness areas through conservation, community development and hospitality. The highly-trained field guides at each of our 12 lodges are a critical part of the guest experience, and we are proud to employ a large number of women in this traditionally male-dominated role.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Three of these dynamic and passionate women can be found leading twice-daily game drives for guests at Singita Kruger National Park in South Africa. Chantelle Venter, Jani Lourens and Deirdre Opie are part of the team responsible for conducting unique guided safari experiences, whether on foot, by bike or in state-of-the-art Land Rovers.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Head Guide Deirdre loves to wow guests with “those once in a lifetime situations where you as a guide know that what you have just experienced is a unique and special moment, your excitement becomes infectious and the guests feel like they have really seen something extraordinary.” Growing up on a farm instilled a fierce love of animals in Deirdre, who volunteered at the Johannesburg Zoo during her school years, looking after the farmyard animals, birds and primates. She studied Nature Conservation at university and later completed a guiding course which allowed her to share her love and knowledge of the outdoors with others.

Singita Lebombo Lodge

Chantelle also fondly remembers growing up outdoors: “My childhood was spent running around, climbing and falling out of trees, riding horses, falling off skateboards and getting bloody noses in the karate class. I realised after two years in the corporate world that I was not cut out to sit behind a desk.” All three guides share a common distaste for traditional office jobs, preferring instead to be in the bush and far away from “high heels and pantyhose”! As Jani astutely remarks; “There is always something new to discover. Not only within nature but also within myself, one can learn so much by just observing what goes on around you. And that is what keeps the continuous inspiration burning.”

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Singita’s guiding experience is designed to be delivered with humility, professionalism and flexibility, with the end result being an educational experience for all. This attitude, along with an uncompromising sensitivity towards the environment, is embodied in all our field guides and trackers. Guests are often impressed by their ability to read the signs of nature, track animals and wield an enormous game vehicle across unforgiving terrain. Jani tends to make a big impression in this regard, as her diminutive size can be misleading. “I am not one of the tallest people out there and I sometimes have to elevate myself from the seat to check where I’m driving when off-road. I always get positive comments from guests after they experienced my mad 4×4 skills though!”

Singita_Mar 05 2015_0236

When asked about the most memorable moments in their time at Singita, all three guides have an interesting wildlife story to tell. For Deirdre it was a rare encounter with a pangolin, Jani got between a lioness and her cubs while on foot one day, and Chantelle was chased around the staff laundry building by a honey-badger! “This is the simple life where one does not need to own a lot of things because the environment around us is what makes us rich,” says Jani.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

They also have good advice for aspiring female field guides or any women following an unconventional career path. Chantelle believes that “you create your own opportunities. Aim to be the best so that nobody can question your ability. Never complain and always remain humble and compassionate. Start doing push-ups.” Deirdre says that focus is also important: “You have to decide where you want to go, how you are going to get there, and then stick to it. In careers that are unusual for women, you will have to work far harder and prove to be far more competent in order to be treated as an equal. I would like to think that by being one of a few female Head Guides it shows other women that with hard work and determination you can be a leader in any industry of your choice.”

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Please visit our website to find out about career opportunities at Singita, and learn more about the experience of working in a “place of miracles”.

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Pamushana Pups Caught on Camera

September 18, 2015 - Conservation,Did You Know?,Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Singita Pamushana Lodge,Wildlife

It’s considered a very good day in the bush for most wildlife enthusiasts if they manage to spot a rare or elusive animal. It’s also very exciting to see babies in the wild, so to combine both into one sighting is a real highlight for our guides and guests. This is exactly what happened on a recent game drive in Singita Pamushana in Zimbabwe, when field guide Jenny Hishin came across a family of highly endangered African wild dogs and their pups.

Wild dogs at Singita Pamushana

The importance of a sighting like this is better understood when you learn that there are only an estimated 6 600 adults left in the wild. Habitat degradation, disease and human persecution threaten to wipe out these highly intelligent and social animals. The fact that they are breeding in the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve and its surrounds is very encouraging. This litter was born during the winter to the alpha pair in the pack, in the shelter of a rocky area of a sandstone ridge, where they have then been safeguarded by the other members of the group.

Wild dogs at Singita Pamushana

The 130 000 acre reserve in southeastern Zimbabwe offers endangered animals like the African wild dog a pristine habitat in which to flourish. The role of Singita Pamushana Lodge is to help foster the sustainability of the wildlife and broader ecology in the region, while each guest who visits makes a positive impact to this incredibly beautiful land and dynamic community.

Wild dogs at Singita Pamushana

Our monthly Wildlife Reports are a source of delightful photos and anecdotes, and a great place to keep up to date with news of the wild dogs and other wildlife on Singita’s properties. You can also visit our site to find out more about conservation at the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, which is home to Singita Pamushana Lodge.

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Conservation at our Core

September 17, 2015 - Conservation,Environment,Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

For most safari travellers, the first image that’ll spring to mind when they think of Singita is a luxury lodge parachuted effortlessly into the wilderness. It could also be the smiling face of the guide that took them deep into the bushveld, and returned them safely home that night. Perhaps it’s the crackling fire and star-spangled sky during a memorable boma dinner.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp, Tanzania

Singita Mara River Tented Camp, Tanzania

For Dave Wright, it’s more likely to be the image of water running freely across the cracked red earth as long-dry streams burst back to life, or elephants trundling through bushveld where wire fences once penned them in. “For many years the perception has been that we are a hospitality company,” says Wright, Environmental Manager at Singita Sabi Sand. “In fact we’re all about conservation.”

Unlike most safari operators, Singita is unique in taking full responsibility for the conservation of the land it operates on, ensuring eco-tourism and eco-systems work hand-in-hand. “Many companies contribute financially to conservation through lease and concession fees, but they don’t actively conserve the land,” explains Singita’s Chief Operating Officer Mark Witney. “Except for the Singita Kruger National Park concession, we do all the conservation work ourselves. Particularly in Zimbabwe and Tanzania, where specialists within the committee are responsible for the conservation of those areas.”

Zim_Pamushana - Elephant (88)

Underpinning and guiding the group’s work is the unique Conservation Committee, what Witney calls “Singita’s conservation brains trust”. The highly trained Environmental Managers – three of whom hold PhD qualifications in ecology – from each of Singita’s properties form the backbone of the group, bringing decades of scientific and conservation experience to the table. Witney and an outside ecologist provide further input and expertise and the Committee meets regularly through the year, travelling to one of the Singita properties to share research and conservation lessons.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve in south-eastern Zimbabwe, home to Singita Pamushana Lodge, is a perfect example. This 50 000-hectare wilderness, previously an old cattle ranch, has been rehabilitated and transformed into “a successful conservation project that has been given back to wildlife,” says Witney. Before the establishment of the Reserve only a handful of common antelope were found on the land. Today, game is abundant across the property with healthy populations of endangered rhinoceros, as well as the rare sable which were successfully reintroduced to the region.

Likewise in Tanzania, the 150 000 hectares of land under Singita’s custodianship were once poorly managed and over-utilised hunting concessions.


Another significant success story is the dropping of fences between the privately-owned Sabi Sand Nature Reserve and the state-owned Kruger National Park in the mid-1990s. Within days the reserve changed from a fenced-off island of bushveld, to part of a wider ecosystem. “For the elephants it was like opening the gates of an ice-cream factory,” chuckles Wright. “Previously bush encroachment was a big issue and we had to introduce elephant. When the fence came down that changed completely, particularly in the winter when elephants follow the conduits of green vegetation along the Sand River. Now we have well over 1000 elephant on the property.”

While managing and restoring the land is key, ensuring the lodges touch the earth lightly is equally important. At each property the Environmental Manager ensures that the footprint of the lodge is kept to a minimum, with everything from waste disposal to power generation constantly assessed for ways to reduce any adverse impact on the environment. “Here at Singita Boulders Lodge we’ve moved all of our electrical power lines underground, and we’ve also improved the sourcing of water by tapping into underground aquifers adjacent to the river, so there’s a reliable water supply,” explains Wright.

Conservation at Singita

While guests may leave with a lifetime of wilderness memories, the luxury lodges and superlative game viewing is really just the tip of Singita’s conservation iceberg. And if you find yourself at Singita Boulders Lodge in the Sabi Sand; don’t forget to ask Dave about that fence…

You can find out more about Singita’s ongoing nature and wildlife conservation projects on our website. These include a rhino reintroduction programme in Zimbabwe, support for wildlife research in the Kruger National Park and a successful anti-poaching unit in the Serengeti. 

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Sharing the fun on Facebook

August 21, 2015 - Kruger National Park,Singita Mara River Tented Camp,Singita Sasakwa Lodge,Wildlife

Singita’s Facebook page is a treasure trove of gorgeous wildlife photography, shared stories from guests, snapshots from the lodges and real-time updates from our field guides. It’s a great way to see what happens out on game drive and behind the scenes at each of our 12 lodges and camps, and see stunning photos of your favourite African animals. In case you haven’t yet liked our page, here is a quick recap of the most recent posts:

Singita on Facebook

The Lilac-breasted Roller is one of the few species of birds that are adding colour to the dry bush veld during this season. These birds get their name from the aerial acrobatics they perform during courtship or territorial flights. Rollers are often spotted quite quickly in the bush as they often perch prominently whilst hunting, in search of insects on the ground.

Singita on Facebook

It is that time of year again, when guests at Singita Mara River Tented Camp are treated to one of the greatest shows on earth. Our Camp Manager, Robyn, just gave us the following update:
“The last few days we have seen the small oxbow of land in front of the camp embellished by a sea of black. Thousands of wildebeest have littered the plains in front of us each morning. As morning turns to afternoon, the cries of thousands crescendo as the wildebeest begin to plunge down the steep banks attempting to cross the Mara River. Our guests have been lucky enough to view crossings a mere 10 minutes drive from the lodge. We can hear and see them straight from the decks of the camp!”

Singita on Facebook

Agility perfected at a young age: A leopard dance of a different kind.

Singita on Facebook

The view from your veranda at Singita Sasakwa Lodge is simply breathtaking. With nothing but the vast expanse of the Serengeti before you, there is no better way to spend an afternoon!

Singita on Facebook

It’s almost that time of day in the bush – afternoon high tea. The pastry chefs are placing the last minute touches to some special items in honour of World Lion Day.

You can follow Singita on various social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Vimeo. All of these feeds can be seen together on the Social page of our website.

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Highlights from our Wildlife Reports

August 04, 2015 - Experience,Kruger National Park,Lamai,Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Sabi Sand,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

If your morning routine doesn’t involve a sunrise game drive and a steaming cup of coffee overlooking the waterhole, then a close substitute would be catching up on our latest Wildlife Reports; first-hand field guide reports straight from the wilderness. These bush journals chronicle the evolving landscape throughout the year as well as noteworthy wildlife sightings and game statistics. Some of the most recent reports include some stunning sunsets, a pair of cheetah on a kill, an amorous leopard and a rare pack of endangered wild dogs in the Serengeti:


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

We are fortunate in Africa to be blessed with some beautiful skies, whether it be the rosy dawns, the unpolluted blues of autumn days, or the sparkling splendour of our starry night skies. Most famous of all, however, are our sunsets, and after more than five and a half decades on this continent, I still appreciate each and every sunset that I am fortunate enough to see. There’s something about sunsets that inspire you to take time to think back on the day’s events, and just to marvel at the majesty of it all.

Report by Leon van Wyk, Coleman Mnisi, Nic Moxham and Ross Couper. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report April 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

The month of June in the Lamai was unusually wet with the first half of the month yielding rainstorms of colossal proportions. The rain patterns of the Serengeti have been rather mercurial this year, seeing the second quarter producing more storm clouds which inevitably dictate the ebb and flow of the Mara River and, so too, the movement of the wildlife. On some mornings the level of the river rose over 60cm in a matter of hours.

Report by Paul Nell with photos by Stuart Levine, Adas Anthony and Ryan Schmitt. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report June 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

Imagine the thrill of coming across two male cheetah on a kill. It’s such a privilege to see, especially as they have disappeared from an estimated 76% of their historic range in Africa. Their population has declined by at least 30% over the past 18 years, and is primarily due to habitat loss and fragmentation, as well as killing and capture of cheetahs for trade and to prevent livestock loss.

Report by Jenny Hishin with photos by Mark Saunders and Simon Capon. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report April 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

The Xhikelengane female, who is truly regarded as the grandmother of the leopards at Singita Kruger National Park, and definitely a favourite among the guides, has been doing her best to get the attention of the males in her region… Over the past few weeks we have noticed her moving further and further north out of her usual territory, and scent marking like her life depended on it! This behaviour is to attract potential suitors in her direction. Finally, after weeks of advertising, an unknown large male found her and we were lucky enough to see them mating twice over the course of four days. This intense and usually very secretive affair is one of the ultimate sightings on safari.

Report by Nick du Plessis, Barry Peiser and Deirdre Opie. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report April 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

The call came in on the radio around 8:30am. Guide Ray Wankyo reported that he had spotted a pack of 13 wild dogs south of the Singita Grumeti boundary with the Serengeti National Park. Words cannot explain the excitement that proceeded after hearing that call. The entire guiding team piled into game viewers to go and witness this incredible sighting. In the 13 years since Singita Grumeti’s inception, wild dogs have only been seen on one other occasion on the concession, and that was back in 2007.

Report by Lizzie Hamrick with photos by Ryan Schmitt, Brad Murray. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report April 2015

You can subscribe to our blog via RSS or email to stay up to date with our Wildlife Reports and plenty of other goings on at our 12 lodges and camps in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania.

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A Wildlife Showcase

July 24, 2015 - Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

There was a time when the earth was lush with unspoilt wilderness teeming with game; today, places like this are the exception rather than the rule. As trusted guardian of over half a million acres of untouched African bush, Singita is proud to play a role in the conservation, preservation and protection of such vulnerable land.

Our concessions, reserves, and properties represent some of the most pristine wilderness areas on the continent and we are dedicated to maintaining these incredible pieces of earth for future generations. In this short film, we celebrate Africa’s abundance and diversity of wildlife, and the fragile ecosystems of which they are a part.


Read more about Singita’s rich history, as well as what the future holds for this devoted pioneer of ecotourism. You can also follow the Conservation category on our blog for the latest news from our hands-on environmental sustainability teams.

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