Category Archives: Wildlife

Quick & Quirky: Wildlife Snippets on our Vimeo Channel

October 08, 2015 - Environment,Experience,Wildlife

Have you ever seen an elephant blowing bubbles? Or a very lucky wildebeest escaping the clutches of an apex predator? Or a leopard cub getting a bath from his mother? Singita’s Vimeo channel is a gold mine for wildlife lovers, and is full of great sightings just like those described. Most of the wildlife posts are short snippets filmed by field guides out on game drives with guests, and many contain unusual or exciting animal behaviour.

Leopard at Singita Kruger National Park

Here are some highlights of the most amusing and eye-catching wildlife sightings you can find on our channel:

Lioness vs. Porcupine

Singita Kruger National Park is well known for the large lion prides and ever changing dynamics within the family groups. Over the last few months especially, we have been spoilt with terrific sightings of the prides as they move through the concession and especially the phenomenal array of cubs. This sighting however was completely unique and very entertaining! Two lionesses taking on a porcupine? That is very brave considering the damage that those quills can cause.

A Feast for the Shishangaan Pride

Three adult lionesses with seven cubs from the Shishangaan pride were seen on a few occasions this month. The cubs gorged themselves and could hardly walk to keep up as their mothers led them away from the kill sites after feeding, in order to keep them safe. We also saw a total of thirty-two Shishangaan pride members feeding on the remains of a Cape buffalo a few weeks ago!

Leopard Cub Having a Bath

Singita Sabi Sand is renowned for a healthy leopard population, where guests are treated to daily sightings of these majestic animals. Our guides cam upon this incredible sighting on morning game drive today.

Lucky Gnu (Singita Kruger National Park)

We were lucky enough to witness this gripping encounter between a lone wildebeest and a lioness. Through true determination and possibly a bit of luck this wildebeest managed to fight off the lioness and gallop to freedom. Rare sightings like these are such a privilege to see!

Baby Hippo Going for a Dip (Singita Kruger National Park)

Newly born hippos are relatively small, weighing from 55 to 120 pounds, and are fiercly protected by their mothers. Young hippos can only stay under water for about half a minute, but adults can stay submerged up to six minutes.

Elephants Blowing Bubbles (Singita Sabi Sand)

Anywhere on the concession where there is water, there are elephants. Mid-morning at the water source is generally the best, as the herds come down to drink. There are often very good interactions between the elephants and the crocodiles and hippos wishing to bask in the sun on the riverbanks.

Singita’s social channels are a great place to get the latest news from our 12 lodges and camps. You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and, of course, Vimeo.

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Get to Know Us: Singita’s Female Field Guides

September 25, 2015 - Did You Know?,People of Singita,Wildlife

Singita’s success is built on the collective strength and vision of deeply committed people, all passionate about Africa and linked by a common purpose to protect and preserve the world’s last remaining wilderness areas through conservation, community development and hospitality. The highly-trained field guides at each of our 12 lodges are a critical part of the guest experience, and we are proud to employ a large number of women in this traditionally male-dominated role.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Three of these dynamic and passionate women can be found leading twice-daily game drives for guests at Singita Kruger National Park in South Africa. Chantelle Venter, Jani Lourens and Deirdre Opie are part of the team responsible for conducting unique guided safari experiences, whether on foot, by bike or in state-of-the-art Land Rovers.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Head Guide Deirdre loves to wow guests with “those once in a lifetime situations where you as a guide know that what you have just experienced is a unique and special moment, your excitement becomes infectious and the guests feel like they have really seen something extraordinary.” Growing up on a farm instilled a fierce love of animals in Deirdre, who volunteered at the Johannesburg Zoo during her school years, looking after the farmyard animals, birds and primates. She studied Nature Conservation at university and later completed a guiding course which allowed her to share her love and knowledge of the outdoors with others.

Singita Lebombo Lodge

Chantelle also fondly remembers growing up outdoors: “My childhood was spent running around, climbing and falling out of trees, riding horses, falling off skateboards and getting bloody noses in the karate class. I realised after two years in the corporate world that I was not cut out to sit behind a desk.” All three guides share a common distaste for traditional office jobs, preferring instead to be in the bush and far away from “high heels and pantyhose”! As Jani astutely remarks; “There is always something new to discover. Not only within nature but also within myself, one can learn so much by just observing what goes on around you. And that is what keeps the continuous inspiration burning.”

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Singita’s guiding experience is designed to be delivered with humility, professionalism and flexibility, with the end result being an educational experience for all. This attitude, along with an uncompromising sensitivity towards the environment, is embodied in all our field guides and trackers. Guests are often impressed by their ability to read the signs of nature, track animals and wield an enormous game vehicle across unforgiving terrain. Jani tends to make a big impression in this regard, as her diminutive size can be misleading. “I am not one of the tallest people out there and I sometimes have to elevate myself from the seat to check where I’m driving when off-road. I always get positive comments from guests after they experienced my mad 4×4 skills though!”

Singita_Mar 05 2015_0236

When asked about the most memorable moments in their time at Singita, all three guides have an interesting wildlife story to tell. For Deirdre it was a rare encounter with a pangolin, Jani got between a lioness and her cubs while on foot one day, and Chantelle was chased around the staff laundry building by a honey-badger! “This is the simple life where one does not need to own a lot of things because the environment around us is what makes us rich,” says Jani.

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

They also have good advice for aspiring female field guides or any women following an unconventional career path. Chantelle believes that “you create your own opportunities. Aim to be the best so that nobody can question your ability. Never complain and always remain humble and compassionate. Start doing push-ups.” Deirdre says that focus is also important: “You have to decide where you want to go, how you are going to get there, and then stick to it. In careers that are unusual for women, you will have to work far harder and prove to be far more competent in order to be treated as an equal. I would like to think that by being one of a few female Head Guides it shows other women that with hard work and determination you can be a leader in any industry of your choice.”

Female field guides at Singita Kruger National Park

Please visit our website to find out about career opportunities at Singita, and learn more about the experience of working in a “place of miracles”.

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Pamushana Pups Caught on Camera

September 18, 2015 - Conservation,Did You Know?,Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Singita Pamushana Lodge,Wildlife

It’s considered a very good day in the bush for most wildlife enthusiasts if they manage to spot a rare or elusive animal. It’s also very exciting to see babies in the wild, so to combine both into one sighting is a real highlight for our guides and guests. This is exactly what happened on a recent game drive in Singita Pamushana in Zimbabwe, when field guide Jenny Hishin came across a family of highly endangered African wild dogs and their pups.

Wild dogs at Singita Pamushana

The importance of a sighting like this is better understood when you learn that there are only an estimated 6 600 adults left in the wild. Habitat degradation, disease and human persecution threaten to wipe out these highly intelligent and social animals. The fact that they are breeding in the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve and its surrounds is very encouraging. This litter was born during the winter to the alpha pair in the pack, in the shelter of a rocky area of a sandstone ridge, where they have then been safeguarded by the other members of the group.

Wild dogs at Singita Pamushana

The 130 000 acre reserve in southeastern Zimbabwe offers endangered animals like the African wild dog a pristine habitat in which to flourish. The role of Singita Pamushana Lodge is to help foster the sustainability of the wildlife and broader ecology in the region, while each guest who visits makes a positive impact to this incredibly beautiful land and dynamic community.

Wild dogs at Singita Pamushana

Our monthly Wildlife Reports are a source of delightful photos and anecdotes, and a great place to keep up to date with news of the wild dogs and other wildlife on Singita’s properties. You can also visit our site to find out more about conservation at the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, which is home to Singita Pamushana Lodge.

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Conservation at our Core

September 17, 2015 - Conservation,Environment,Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

For most safari travellers, the first image that’ll spring to mind when they think of Singita is a luxury lodge parachuted effortlessly into the wilderness. It could also be the smiling face of the guide that took them deep into the bushveld, and returned them safely home that night. Perhaps it’s the crackling fire and star-spangled sky during a memorable boma dinner.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp, Tanzania

Singita Mara River Tented Camp, Tanzania

For Dave Wright, it’s more likely to be the image of water running freely across the cracked red earth as long-dry streams burst back to life, or elephants trundling through bushveld where wire fences once penned them in. “For many years the perception has been that we are a hospitality company,” says Wright, Environmental Manager at Singita Sabi Sand. “In fact we’re all about conservation.”

Unlike most safari operators, Singita is unique in taking full responsibility for the conservation of the land it operates on, ensuring eco-tourism and eco-systems work hand-in-hand. “Many companies contribute financially to conservation through lease and concession fees, but they don’t actively conserve the land,” explains Singita’s Chief Operating Officer Mark Witney. “Except for the Singita Kruger National Park concession, we do all the conservation work ourselves. Particularly in Zimbabwe and Tanzania, where specialists within the committee are responsible for the conservation of those areas.”

Zim_Pamushana - Elephant (88)

Underpinning and guiding the group’s work is the unique Conservation Committee, what Witney calls “Singita’s conservation brains trust”. The highly trained Environmental Managers – three of whom hold PhD qualifications in ecology – from each of Singita’s properties form the backbone of the group, bringing decades of scientific and conservation experience to the table. Witney and an outside ecologist provide further input and expertise and the Committee meets regularly through the year, travelling to one of the Singita properties to share research and conservation lessons.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve in south-eastern Zimbabwe, home to Singita Pamushana Lodge, is a perfect example. This 50 000-hectare wilderness, previously an old cattle ranch, has been rehabilitated and transformed into “a successful conservation project that has been given back to wildlife,” says Witney. Before the establishment of the Reserve only a handful of common antelope were found on the land. Today, game is abundant across the property with healthy populations of endangered rhinoceros, as well as the rare sable which were successfully reintroduced to the region.

Likewise in Tanzania, the 150 000 hectares of land under Singita’s custodianship were once poorly managed and over-utilised hunting concessions.


Another significant success story is the dropping of fences between the privately-owned Sabi Sand Nature Reserve and the state-owned Kruger National Park in the mid-1990s. Within days the reserve changed from a fenced-off island of bushveld, to part of a wider ecosystem. “For the elephants it was like opening the gates of an ice-cream factory,” chuckles Wright. “Previously bush encroachment was a big issue and we had to introduce elephant. When the fence came down that changed completely, particularly in the winter when elephants follow the conduits of green vegetation along the Sand River. Now we have well over 1000 elephant on the property.”

While managing and restoring the land is key, ensuring the lodges touch the earth lightly is equally important. At each property the Environmental Manager ensures that the footprint of the lodge is kept to a minimum, with everything from waste disposal to power generation constantly assessed for ways to reduce any adverse impact on the environment. “Here at Singita Boulders Lodge we’ve moved all of our electrical power lines underground, and we’ve also improved the sourcing of water by tapping into underground aquifers adjacent to the river, so there’s a reliable water supply,” explains Wright.

Conservation at Singita

While guests may leave with a lifetime of wilderness memories, the luxury lodges and superlative game viewing is really just the tip of Singita’s conservation iceberg. And if you find yourself at Singita Boulders Lodge in the Sabi Sand; don’t forget to ask Dave about that fence…

You can find out more about Singita’s ongoing nature and wildlife conservation projects on our website. These include a rhino reintroduction programme in Zimbabwe, support for wildlife research in the Kruger National Park and a successful anti-poaching unit in the Serengeti. 

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Sharing the fun on Facebook

August 21, 2015 - Kruger National Park,Singita Mara River Tented Camp,Singita Sasakwa Lodge,Wildlife

Singita’s Facebook page is a treasure trove of gorgeous wildlife photography, shared stories from guests, snapshots from the lodges and real-time updates from our field guides. It’s a great way to see what happens out on game drive and behind the scenes at each of our 12 lodges and camps, and see stunning photos of your favourite African animals. In case you haven’t yet liked our page, here is a quick recap of the most recent posts:

Singita on Facebook

The Lilac-breasted Roller is one of the few species of birds that are adding colour to the dry bush veld during this season. These birds get their name from the aerial acrobatics they perform during courtship or territorial flights. Rollers are often spotted quite quickly in the bush as they often perch prominently whilst hunting, in search of insects on the ground.

Singita on Facebook

It is that time of year again, when guests at Singita Mara River Tented Camp are treated to one of the greatest shows on earth. Our Camp Manager, Robyn, just gave us the following update:
“The last few days we have seen the small oxbow of land in front of the camp embellished by a sea of black. Thousands of wildebeest have littered the plains in front of us each morning. As morning turns to afternoon, the cries of thousands crescendo as the wildebeest begin to plunge down the steep banks attempting to cross the Mara River. Our guests have been lucky enough to view crossings a mere 10 minutes drive from the lodge. We can hear and see them straight from the decks of the camp!”

Singita on Facebook

Agility perfected at a young age: A leopard dance of a different kind.

Singita on Facebook

The view from your veranda at Singita Sasakwa Lodge is simply breathtaking. With nothing but the vast expanse of the Serengeti before you, there is no better way to spend an afternoon!

Singita on Facebook

It’s almost that time of day in the bush – afternoon high tea. The pastry chefs are placing the last minute touches to some special items in honour of World Lion Day.

You can follow Singita on various social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Vimeo. All of these feeds can be seen together on the Social page of our website.

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Highlights from our Wildlife Reports

August 04, 2015 - Experience,Kruger National Park,Lamai,Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Sabi Sand,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

If your morning routine doesn’t involve a sunrise game drive and a steaming cup of coffee overlooking the waterhole, then a close substitute would be catching up on our latest Wildlife Reports; first-hand field guide reports straight from the wilderness. These bush journals chronicle the evolving landscape throughout the year as well as noteworthy wildlife sightings and game statistics. Some of the most recent reports include some stunning sunsets, a pair of cheetah on a kill, an amorous leopard and a rare pack of endangered wild dogs in the Serengeti:


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

We are fortunate in Africa to be blessed with some beautiful skies, whether it be the rosy dawns, the unpolluted blues of autumn days, or the sparkling splendour of our starry night skies. Most famous of all, however, are our sunsets, and after more than five and a half decades on this continent, I still appreciate each and every sunset that I am fortunate enough to see. There’s something about sunsets that inspire you to take time to think back on the day’s events, and just to marvel at the majesty of it all.

Report by Leon van Wyk, Coleman Mnisi, Nic Moxham and Ross Couper. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report April 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

The month of June in the Lamai was unusually wet with the first half of the month yielding rainstorms of colossal proportions. The rain patterns of the Serengeti have been rather mercurial this year, seeing the second quarter producing more storm clouds which inevitably dictate the ebb and flow of the Mara River and, so too, the movement of the wildlife. On some mornings the level of the river rose over 60cm in a matter of hours.

Report by Paul Nell with photos by Stuart Levine, Adas Anthony and Ryan Schmitt. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report June 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

Imagine the thrill of coming across two male cheetah on a kill. It’s such a privilege to see, especially as they have disappeared from an estimated 76% of their historic range in Africa. Their population has declined by at least 30% over the past 18 years, and is primarily due to habitat loss and fragmentation, as well as killing and capture of cheetahs for trade and to prevent livestock loss.

Report by Jenny Hishin with photos by Mark Saunders and Simon Capon. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report April 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

The Xhikelengane female, who is truly regarded as the grandmother of the leopards at Singita Kruger National Park, and definitely a favourite among the guides, has been doing her best to get the attention of the males in her region… Over the past few weeks we have noticed her moving further and further north out of her usual territory, and scent marking like her life depended on it! This behaviour is to attract potential suitors in her direction. Finally, after weeks of advertising, an unknown large male found her and we were lucky enough to see them mating twice over the course of four days. This intense and usually very secretive affair is one of the ultimate sightings on safari.

Report by Nick du Plessis, Barry Peiser and Deirdre Opie. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report April 2015


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports - Singita

The call came in on the radio around 8:30am. Guide Ray Wankyo reported that he had spotted a pack of 13 wild dogs south of the Singita Grumeti boundary with the Serengeti National Park. Words cannot explain the excitement that proceeded after hearing that call. The entire guiding team piled into game viewers to go and witness this incredible sighting. In the 13 years since Singita Grumeti’s inception, wild dogs have only been seen on one other occasion on the concession, and that was back in 2007.

Report by Lizzie Hamrick with photos by Ryan Schmitt, Brad Murray. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report April 2015

You can subscribe to our blog via RSS or email to stay up to date with our Wildlife Reports and plenty of other goings on at our 12 lodges and camps in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania.

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A Wildlife Showcase

July 24, 2015 - Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

There was a time when the earth was lush with unspoilt wilderness teeming with game; today, places like this are the exception rather than the rule. As trusted guardian of over half a million acres of untouched African bush, Singita is proud to play a role in the conservation, preservation and protection of such vulnerable land.

Our concessions, reserves, and properties represent some of the most pristine wilderness areas on the continent and we are dedicated to maintaining these incredible pieces of earth for future generations. In this short film, we celebrate Africa’s abundance and diversity of wildlife, and the fragile ecosystems of which they are a part.


Read more about Singita’s rich history, as well as what the future holds for this devoted pioneer of ecotourism. You can also follow the Conservation category on our blog for the latest news from our hands-on environmental sustainability teams.

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Creatures Great & Small: Banded Mongoose

June 30, 2015 - Did You Know?,Wildlife

Most safari enthusiasts who have spent some time out on game drive will be familiar with the sight of a small, furry creature darting into the undergrowth as the vehicle trundles down the path. Usually seen as a brown blur out of the corner of one’s eye, the banded mongoose is easily identifiable by the distinctive stripes along its back. They have long claws on their front feet which are used for digging up insects, especially beetles and their larvae, and they eat an array of fruit, meat and other morsels.

Banded mongoose at Singita

Banded mongooses live in mixed-sex groups of roughly 20 animals and sleep together at night in underground dens (often abandoned termite mounds) and change dens every 2-3 days. The females tend to breed all at the same time, giving birth within hours of each other to litters of 2–6 pups. The young stay in the den for their first four weeks of their lives, being carefully guarded by a adult caretakers while the other pack members forage for food. All the pack members take care of the pups, the mothers suckle each other’s offspring indiscriminately, and each young pup has an adult “escort” that catches prey for it.

Banded mongoose at Singita

Collective noun options for mongooses include ‘business’ and ‘rush’ – both referring to the frenetic pace at which they go about their daily search for food, relying mainly on their acute sense of smell. They are also known for their constant, high-pitched chatter; chirps to keep in contact with their family, sharp chittering for sounding the alarm, delighted squeaks upon finding food and even soft purring sounds of contentment.

Banded mongoose at Singita

Animal lovers will be fascinated by our monthly Wildlife Reports, which comprise stories and information like this. They are written and photographed by our field guides from across our concessions in South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

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Introducing the Shishangaan Lions

May 29, 2015 - Experience,Kruger National Park,Safari,Wildlife


If you follow our Facebook page or are an avid reader of our monthly Wildlife Reports, you will no doubt have seen the thrilling news of the recent birth of not one but two rare white lion cubs at Singita Kruger National Park. This remarkable event was first announced in July last year, in a very exciting note from field guide Nick du Plessis: “On the 11th of July we had a sighting, that when it came over the radio, you could hardly believe your ears! Clement had found and called in members of the Shishangaan pride with cubs, but one of the cubs was just a little different. He is snow white!”


He went on to say: “The fact that this rare white lion is seen as far east as this in the Kruger National Park is nothing short of a miracle, and as far as we know has never been spotted or recorded in this area before! The fact that the rare white lions continue to reoccur in their natural habitat despite historical forced removals by humans for commercial trophy hunting and breeding in the 1970s is a real testimony to their genetic diversity and pure resilience! We hope this is just the beginning of something very very special at Singita Kruger National Park.”


Nick proved to be correct, as the white lion cubs have become one of the stars of the monthly guide’s journals from the region. Here are a few snippets from recent Wildlife Reports, following the progress of the cubs and the rest of the Shishangaan pride over the past few months:

December 2014
The large Shishangaan Pride has made a long awaited return to the concession! For the last few months, following the fires, the pride had been non-existent and majority of our lion sightings had been of the Mountain Pride, further north. When the rains finally came and the burnt areas started to green up and teem with wildlife, the lions were caught on the wrong side of the now-flowing N’wanetsi River and it wasn’t possible to cross safely at Gudzane stream with their cubs.


Shortly after, and seemingly out of nowhere, lion tracks were seen around the central parts of the concession! The previous day we had seen four of the dominant males further north of this location. Upon investigation, we stumbled upon a magnificent sighting of 21 lions (and this isn’t even the full complement of the Shishangaan Pride)! Five lionesses with 16 cubs of varying ages and sizes were seen, including the white lion cub, which looks slightly dirty, but is growing well and thriving. This leaves five lionesses unaccounted for, some of which should have cubs! With the pride having successfully hunted and fed where there is so much plains game, we hope that they will stay on the western side of the concession.

So far the Shishangaan Pride has been seen much further south of the concession than we have ever known them to be, which means with the dominant males around, there is a definite shift in territory. This is because the lionesses with cubs need to be as close to the central parts of their territories as possible and thus avoid the chance of encountering any nomadic male lions that would try to hurt or kill the cubs.


January 2015
The Shishangaan male lions brought down a fully-grown female giraffe in the middle of the month. They seem to have perfected a hunting technique of late, with it being their third giraffe kill in as many months. There was a total of 36 sightings of the Shishangaan pride this month, including 16 cubs from five lionesses and the strong and healthy-looking 9-month-old white lion cub.


February 2015:
It is sometimes quite difficult to decide what to write about in a monthly journal, there are normally a couple of particularly interesting events to choose from which may have happened or been developing over some time. But this month was an absolute ‘no-brainer’ as the sightings and regularity of the Shishangaan pride has never been more dependable. Guests have enjoyed a total of 63 lion sightings this month, most of which have been of the Shishangaan pride.

What has made it even more exciting, and was the reason for the pride splitting in the first place, is the number of cubs that have been seen in the last couple of weeks. We now believe there to be a total of at least 28 cubs, with a further two lactating females that haven’t brought their little cubs out of hiding yet. And within that huge number of cubs there is a second little white cub! We knew there was a chance of this, but to actually see the second little cub as proof that the gene is definitely in circulation was just brilliant, and this time it is a female! Why that is so important is that the young white male, once reaching sexual maturity, will be evicted from the pride and we may never see him again – this is the species way of discouraging inbreeding. On the other hand, with a bit of luck, the female should theoretically spend her entire life within the pride, meaning staying in this area, reaching maturity and having cubs of her own.


March 2015:
A total of 89 lion sightings this month. The majority of the sightings (67) were of the bigger portion of the Shishangaan pride, which comprises of 5 lionesses and 17 cubs, one of them being the older male white cub. The smaller portion of the pride has the young female white cub and she is also doing well.


Don’t miss the next sighting of these beautiful lions – follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get the latest news, photos and video straight from our field guides.

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Creatures Great & Small: Mopane Moth

April 02, 2015 - Kruger National Park,Wildlife

Southern Africa is home to a very interesting tree that is host to an even more interesting insect. The mopane tree grows in hot, dry, low-lying areas and has distinctive butterfly-shaped leaves that brighten up the bush with shades of gold and red during autumn.

Field Guide and photographer James Suter comes across a rhino in a mopane forest

Field Guide and photographer James Suter comes across a rhino in a mopane forest

A very important little creature lives in these trees; the caterpillar of the Mopane or Emperor Moth [Gonimbrasia belina], known as the Mopane Worm, provides a nutritious food source for many rural people in southern Africa. It is a nutrient- and protein-rich snack as well as being easy to harvest and preserve.

Mopane moth | Singita Kruger National Park

Mopane or Emperor Moth (Gonimbrasia belina)

The moths are easily identifiable by their markings, which feature a large orange eyespot on each hind wing and two black and white bands isolating two smaller eyespots. Males have long, feathery antennae that they use to find a mate during their brief three-to-four-day lifespan.

This photo first appeared in the February 2014 Wildlife Report from Singita Kruger National Park. These monthly bush journals are penned by our field guides and are packed with interesting stories and photographs. You can read them all here or catch up on the highlights here.

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