Category Archives: Singita Grumeti

Beekeeping for Biodiversity

April 04, 2014 - Community Development,Conservation,Did You Know?,Singita Grumeti,The Grumeti Fund,Wildlife

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

There has been much written about the plight of bees on a global scale, and the disastrous impact their dwindling populations could have on commercial agriculture and food production. Looking closer to home, the conservation of bees in particular is critical to the survival of local plant life; a crucial element of sustainable environmental conservation and biodiversity enrichment.

At Singita Grumeti in Tanzania, through the Grumeti Fund and the local outreach programme, beekeeping projects have been promoted in local communities since 2010, who in turn earn an income from the sale of honey. This way, the community is supported while the bees’ natural habitat is preserved, and serves as a great example of how conservation and community development are integrally connected.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

To date, seven beekeeping groups and various individuals and families have become involved in the project, and are now responsible for 744 beehives. Among the most successful groups is the Bonchugu Community, under the thoughtful leadership of Amos Matiku. He is described as an energetic, enthusiastic and a results-oriented person who never gives up.

“I first heard about the beekeeping project from a Community Outreach officer in 2011 and although skeptical at first, eventually myself and nine others in the community applied to join the project,” Amos says.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

It started with 20 hives, and members had to contribute 33% of the cost of running each hive, with the Grumeti Fund providing all necessary support needed for the project. In a very short time, the hives were stocked with bees and the members were able to see the fruits of their labour. In June 2012, the group celebrated their first harvest, and just 2 days laters were able to sell all the honey. The income generated covered the initial contribution of each member and they decided as a group to reinvest the profits in order to grow the project.

33 more hives were added, and in 2013, their harvest was the most successful in the whole Serengeti, which afforded them to opportunity to attend an international exhibition in Dar es Salaam. Their organic acacia honey was the show’s bestseller and allowed them to raise additional funds for the project. The group was also invited to attend another regional exhibition and are deservedly proud of their achievements so far.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

The Grumeti Fund also facilitates training for the group, helping them to stay abreast of the latest in beekeeping technology. Amos says: “Through this programme, we have realised the impact conservation can have on all our lives. The acacia forests which were previously degraded are now flourishing with new growth. Beekeeping has created employment and income for local families, while helping to conserve our land and its wildlife.”

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

The keeping of beehives helps to maintain riparian zones, natural springs, and remnant forest and bush areas as these are the the optimal habitat for the bees. The presence of the hives also prevents timber and firewood harvesting in those areas, and discourages elephants (they don’t like bees!) from trampling the nearby farmland and destroying the crops.

In 2002, the Grumeti Community and Wildlife Conservation Fund, a not-for-profit organisation, was granted the right to manage and conserve 350,000 acres, for the benefit of Tanzania, Africa and the world. Four years later, Singita took over the management of the property, at the request of the concessionaire and began the task of generating, via low impact tourism, the funds necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of the reserve through conservation and community partnerships.

 If you would like more information, please contact Pam Richardson, Singita’s Group HR and Community Development Manager.

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Guest Feedback: Seeing the Serengeti on Horseback

March 19, 2014 - Experience,Lodges and Camps,Safari,Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp,Singita Grumeti

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

There can be few more thrilling experiences in life than discovering the vast plains of the Serengeti on horseback; the surreal romance and excitement of exploring the exquisite wilderness of this unique area at eye level with the wildlife. Singita’s day rides and longer equestrian safaris allow guests to journey across the open plains with a herd of zebra or giraffe, bringing them truly in touch with the pulse of Africa. A recent regulation passed by the Tanzanian government now allows Singita’s equestrian safaris to traverse the full breadth and width of the concession, adding even more opportunities for unique game spotting and the discovery of more remote areas of the reserve.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

David and Paula Evans traveled to Singita Grumeti from the United States last year and were so moved by the experience that they sent this kind note of thanks to Jason Trollip, Singita’s Tourism Manager for the region.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

David writes:

The purpose of this e-mail is two-fold.

First, to compliment Singita on what my wife, Paula, and I could only describe as a holiday of lifetime – made possible largely by the unstinting professionalism, charm and dedication of your on-site teams.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Whilst not wanting to decry the unbelievable quality and attention to detail in all that Singita Sasakwa Lodge and Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp we stayed at displayed in abundance, for us it was the people on the ground that made all the difference.

I would particularly single out Ali and Martin (at the Equestrian Centre) and Nick (at Explore).

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Our four-day horseback safari provided us with a series of unforgettable and quite unique moments. From the unquestionable quality of the horses, to the professionalism, skill and knowledge of Martin and Ali, these were four days we will never forget. All this topped off with Martin and Ali’s entertaining and witty company. It was also an unexpected honour to be the first guests to enter one of the reserves on horseback following the new permission recently issued by the government. For advanced riders and repeat guests, having these extra areas to explore is important we feel, given the amount of ground that can be covered on horseback. To us this is an added incentive to return!

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Sheer bliss – an experience we are desperate to repeat.

And now to Singita Explore. Paula and I have been very fortunate in life to stay at some of the best hotels/resorts in the world – we haven’t held back! But I can safely say that what Nick and the team provided us with rivalled the best – all with the challenges of being in the depths of the Serengeti. Quite remarkable. Nick was an incredible host and you could see he would do just anything to ensure your every need is catered for. A real star.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

So – we thank you all; we will be back.

I would close by saying that never before have we felt the urge to send an e-mail in such glowing terms following a holiday. You should all be very proud of what you have accomplished at Singita Grumeti.

Regards
David and Paula Evans

Our sincere thanks to David and Paula for taking the time to write this letter of appreciation. We very much look forward to welcoming you both back to Singita Grumeti!

All photos © 2013 David Evans

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Highlights from our Wildlife Reports

February 13, 2014 - Kruger National Park,Sabi Sand,Singita Grumeti,Singita Pamushana Lodge,Wildlife

One of the most popular features of our website is the monthly Wildlife Reports, penned by Singita’s field guides and including many of their incredible photos from twice-daily game drives with guests. These journals cover recent wildlife sightings, seasonal changes in the local flora, birding highlights and stunning landscape shots from all five regions in which Singita has lodges and camps. Here is a selection of photos from some recent entries for you to enjoy:

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Kruger National Park
Elephants in the Kruger National Park must be some of the most dynamic landscapers to this environment and a safari would simply not be complete without seeing one of these colossal giants strutting its stuff. These giants move prodigious distances over a large home range area rather than marking and protecting a territory, – and this makes sightings of them unpredictable and erratic. Over the past month we had an extraordinary total of 89 sightings, with at least two sightings per day. Even with the huge number of elephants scattered throughout the park and with years of research, theories and estimates on these mythical beasts, so much is still unknown about the species.

Report by Deirdre Opie, Danie Vermeulen, Jani Lourens & Nick du Plessis. Photo by Nick du Plessis. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report December 2013

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Sabi Sand
The Nyaleti male had made his way up the bank of the river and appeared in front of us. He casually walked along the bank until he reached a couple of big boulders. Instead of walking around them, he promptly hopped from boulder to boulder all the way across the river to the other side. (Watch the video – http://youtu.be/jMxeZEZGjdQ) We followed him slowly for about five minutes
before a herd of impala struck his interest. We stopped and watched from a distance as he stalked the herd.

Report by Dylan Brandt, Ross Couper, Daniella Kueck, Leon Van Wyk, Jon Morgan and François Fourie. Photographs on location by Ross Couper, François Fourie and Jon Morgan. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report January 2014

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Pamushana
This first photograph was taken during mid 2011, of a very young rhino calf, that kept charging an old rubbing post, in a very funny case of mistaken identity – the calf seemed to think the stump was a challenging intruder. White rhinos (Ceratotherium simum) have a long gestation of 16 months. Calves stay with their mother for 2 – 3 years. It’s now 2.5 years since the first photo was taken and you can see how much the calf has grown – its mother is on the right in the second photo, and the calf dominates the third photo.

Report written and photographed by Jenny Hishin. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report January 2014

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Grumeti
By early to mid December, the migratory herds would normally be nearing the short grass plains of Ndutu in the southern-most part of the Serengeti. Ndutu is the calving site for the wildebeest and they will typically spend a few months in the area, giving time for the new babies to build up their strength before they begin their arduous journey north. Calves can be expected anywhere from late December to early February, but, like with all things, some babies come earlier! Two early babies were spotted amongst the herds here, and it’s hard to say at such a young age whether they will survive the southern trek to Ndutu.

Report by Lizzie Hamrick with photographs by Ryan Schmitt and Saitoti Ole Kuwai. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report December 2013

Wildlife Reports Highlights | Singita

Singita Lamai
This mountainous horizon marking the border between Kenya and Tanzania is one of the most recognizable features of the Lamai area. It also provides a beautiful background for wildlife photos taken by our field guides.

Report by By Lizzie Hamrick with photographs by Mishi Mtili, Saitoti Ole Kuwai and Eugen Shao. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report December 2013

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Wildlife Census 2013 in Tanzania

December 27, 2013 - Conservation,Conservation,Did You Know?,Environment,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Conservation has always been pivotal to Singita’s existence, as it lives hand-in-hand with Singita’s other two operating principles; ecotourism and community development. We believe it’s the responsible way to maintain and extend the sustainability of the reserves under our care. As we reflect on the successes of the past year, it seems fitting to report on the positive findings of a recent census that took place at Singita Grumeti earlier in 2013.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

The hands-on conservation teams on each property are committed to protecting, maintaining and enhancing the land and its fauna and flora. For example, Singita Grumeti has as one of its goals the rehabilitation of the wildlife populations of Grumeti and Ikorongo Game Reserves and associated wildlife management areas in the Serengeti, Tanzania. Over the last eight years, Singita Grumeti has made a significant investment into the protection of wildlife in the area as well as the infrastructure required to support ecotourism. The effectiveness of these inputs and the management activities that result need to be monitored for appropriate outcomes, the most logical of which is the change in status of the resident herbivores.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Having an understanding of the number of animals, their distribution and numerical trends forms one of the most basic sets of information necessary for the informed management of a wildlife operation. A starting point is a regular and accurate assessment of population size of possibly all, but certainly the ecologically and economically most important species.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

A census was therefore undertaken by way of an aerial survey between the 23rd of August and the 3rd of September 2013 in the Ikorongo-Grumeti Reserves complex. This survey was the tenth undertaken over a period of 11 years, under particularly favourable counting conditions and with a very experienced team of enumerators.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

At the initiation of this project, the Grumeti Fund management team’s primary purpose was to facilitate the recovery of the resident large herbivore populations in this part of the Serengeti ecosystem. This was seen as an important step in the rehabilitation of this particular region, protecting the migratory herds but also helping to fully restore the tourism potential of the area.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Notable statistics from the census include the slowing population increase of buffalo (although this species has shown a six fold increase in estimated size over the last 10 years) and this year showing the highest number of elephant in the area since inception. The population estimate for elephant has varied substantially over the last eight years, probably as a result of the animals moving in and out in response to resource availability. Overall, the population showing a gradual increase of 5% per annum over the last 10 years. In addition, the topi, a local migrant antelope, would appear to have stabilised at around 15 000 animals. Fluctuations are likely due both to forage conditions as well as predation.

census_7

Click the image below to see the full-size infographic depicting population growth until 2011:

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Singita Grumeti also has a highly successful Anti-Poaching Unit comprising 120 game scouts (most of the ex-poachers) who work together with the Wildlife Division to eradicated illegal hunting within the concession. Visit our Conservation page to learn more about how Singita manages the half a million acres of pristine African wilderness that it is proud guardian of.

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A Cheetah Kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge

November 25, 2013 - Experience,Safari,Singita Faru Faru Lodge,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

Cheetah kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge | Marlon du Toit

Photographer and Singita Field Guide, Marlon du Toit, is traveling through Tanzania, visiting Singita’s lodges and camps in the area. Most recently, he has been at Singita Faru Faru Lodge where he was fortunate enough to spot a cheetah in action on the plains of the Serengeti:

Cheetah kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge | Marlon du Toit

“We spied this particular male cheetah reclining in the shade of a prominant Dhalbergia tree. He looked very comfortable so we weren’t sure whether we were in for any excitement, but we got far more than we hoped for!

Cheetah kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge | Marlon du Toit

The thought had hardly crossed my mind when he stood up, stretched and started with his afternoon patrol. He seemed focused on marking his territory which came as no surprise considering all the rain we have had here at Singita Grumeti and would have washed away previous scent-postings. He moved south and although he passed a few herds of gazelle, they were quite far away so he paid them little attention.

Cheetah kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge | Marlon du Toit

Then his whole body posture changed. His eyes opened wide and his head lowered. As I looked up towards where his eyes were fixed I spotted a herd of about twenty wildebeest. He wasted no time at all and within seconds his ambling gait turned into full velocity sprint as he opened up the after-burners in pursuit of the now fleeing wildebeest. Cheetah can achieve speeds of over 100km/h and I am pretty sure he was not far off his top speed. In a cloud of dust and flurry of legs he wrestled one sub-adult wildebeest to the ground and within in less than 10 seconds it was all over.

Cheetah kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge | Marlon du Toit

After subduing his prey, he sat up and scoured the surrounding area to see if there were any other larger predators attracted by all the commotion, but the coast was clear and after getting his breath back he began to feed.

What an amazing last day here on assignment at Singita Faru Faru Lodge.”

Cheetah kill at Singita Faru Faru Lodge | Marlon du Toit

Singita Faru Faru Lodge is set in Grumeti in northern Tanzania, forming part of the Serengeti Mara ecosystem. Built on a gently sloping hill, the lodge is a mix of contemporary, organic style and the quirky practicality of a traditional botanist’s camp. With such close proximity to the river and plains, guests have the unique opportunity to experience a very close connection with the wilderness.

You can also read Marlon’s previous blog post from Singita Lamai. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for more regular updates.

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An Update from the Singita Equestrian Centre

October 30, 2013 - Experience,Safari,Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp,Singita Faru Faru Lodge,Singita Grumeti,Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

A horseback ride over the vast plains of the Serengeti is an exhilarating experience transporting you to the charm and nostalgia of days gone by. Singita Grumeti offers Africa’s most exclusive horseback safari experience, where guests can roam over 350 000 acres of exclusive-use concession in Tanzania’s magnificent Serengeti. Equestrian safaris are ideally suited to more experienced riders and take guests on a journey of exploration to some of the Reserve’s most remote and romantic sites.

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

Martin Dodwell, a member of our dedicated team who run the Singita Equestrian Centre at Singita Sasakwa Lodge, has sent us an update on the recent migration activity in the Serengeti and the game they have spotted on their regular outrides with guests:

“The month of July provided us with perfect riding conditions as the wildebeest arrived, grazing across the plains and clipping the grass, allowing for faster-paced riding. Our first guest ride to Singita Faru Faru Lodge was particularly spectacular, as we rode across Sasakwa Plain with herds of antelope and giraffe, before crossing the Grumeti River and viewing elephant, buffalo and lion all in one ride!

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

In early September, we took a four-night safari to Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp in the Maji region, where the grass is fresh and short, offering excellent ground conditions for riding. Our group comprised four guests from Ireland who have ridden in Kenya and Botswana, and were happy to report that our horseback safari is the best they had ever experienced.

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

Later in the month, we took some guests to explore the Ikorongo Game Reserve while based at another Singita Explore camp near Lion Rocks. We rode across the main road near to Muchuli Hills and out onto open plains with short, green grass. We traveled more than 10km into the Reserve and were lucky enough to ride alongside huge herds of zebra and buffalo. The guests were so impressed with the riding terrain that they have booked a return safari with friends for next year.”

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

Horseback Safaris in the Serengeti | Singita

The Singita Equestrian Centre is located at the top of Sasakwa hill, very close to Singita Sasakwa Lodge overlooking the endless plains of the Serengeti. The stables are home to 18 magnificent horses, ranging from 15.1 to 16.3 hands in height. The stables are superbly well maintained and the horses all in excellent condition. All the horses have been carefully selected for temperament and pace and include South African Boerperd, an indigenous African breed, Thoroughbreds, and a variety of cross breeds.

To find out more, please visit our website or email enquiries@singita.com to get further details from our Equestrian Manager.

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Al Fresco Dining: Banana and Date Loaf

August 22, 2013 - Cuisine,Experience,Singita Grumeti,Singita Sabora Tented Camp

Dining Al Fresco at Singita Grumeti | Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Serengeti is a vast and precious wilderness, spanning 12 000 square miles of seemingly endless grassland. The Great Migration makes its way across these plains, passing through Singita Grumeti, a private wildlife reserve established to protect the indigenous biodiversity of this important ecosystem.

Dining Al Fresco at Singita Grumeti | Singita Sabora Tented Camp

Singita Sabora Tented Camp is one of five Singita properties in the reserve and is designed as a nostalgic, 1920s-style explorer’s camp. The accommodation is full of character, offering a surprisingly luxurious and enchanting safari in the rugged terrain of the surrounding savannah. The elegant simplicity and laid-back romance of the camp is apparent in every moment of our guest’s experience, including meal times which often take place in the open.

Dining Al Fresco at Singita Grumeti | Singita Sabora Tented Camp

It’s difficult to describe the feeling of being seated at a dining table in the shade of an acacia tree in the middle of the Serengeti. The whir of nearby grasshoppers vibrates in the air as the sun rises through the African sky, and you’re handed a cooling glass of homemade iced tea while a herd of zebra casually graze in the distance. Executive Chef, Frank Louw, and his team help to make such moments at Singita Grumeti possible and here he shares a popular recipe for banana and date loaf.

Dining Al Fresco at Singita Grumeti | Singita Sabora Tented Camp

Dining Al Fresco at Singita Grumeti | Singita Sabora Tented Camp

BANANA AND DATE LOAF RECIPE

Ingredients – what you’ll need:
2 cups (300g) self-raising flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp ground cinnamon
125g pitted dates, chopped (substitute with dark chocolate if you like)
1/2 cup (115g) caster sugar
1 cup (250ml) milk
2 eggs
1 cup mashed banana (about 2 large, or three small)
80g cinnamon sugar (optional)
Butter, to serve (optional)

Method – what to do:
Preheat oven to 180°C and line a 24 x 13.5cm loaf pan with non-stick baking paper.
Sift the flour, bicarbonate of soda and nutmeg into a large bowl.
Stir through the dates and sugar.
Combine the milk, eggs and banana in a separate bowl.
Fold into the date mixture until well combined and pour into the loaf pan.
Sprinkle cinnamon sugar on top and bake for 45-50 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the loaf comes out clean.
Cool for 5 minutes and then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
Slice and serve with butter if desired.

Check back soon for more snapshots of al fresco dining at Singita’s lodges and camps. If you need to adjust the metric measurements, here’s a handy online volume converter.

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The People of Singita: Michael Matera

August 01, 2013 - Cuisine,Experience,Singita Grumeti,Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Michael Matera, sous chef at Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Michael Matera, sous chef at Singita Sasakwa Lodge

You would be correct in assuming that some of the most memorable experiences for guests visiting Singita involve exhilarating wildlife sightings on early morning game drives, the spectacular local cuisine put together by our talented kitchen teams and the breathtaking landscapes in which our lodges and camps are situated. While this is certainly true, what guests remark on most often is the warm and attentive manner of our friendly staff members. The people of Singita are its most valuable asset, as they quietly go about ensuring that each of our visitors experience the most sophisticated luxury safari experience on earth.

Over the coming weeks, we’ll be sharing the stories of some of Singita’s most interesting characters, from field guides and trackers to lodge managers and chefs, many of whom have overcome enormous personal challenges along the way. First up is Michael Matera, who is now a chef at Singita Grumeti:

Michael Matera and Frank Louw

Michael Matera and Frank Louw

How did you get started at Singita?
As the oldest son, it was always very important to have a career in order to support the rest of the family. I was working at VIP Safari Club when I applied for work at Singita Sabora Tented Camp, where I was accepted as a grounds attendant. Every day I would clean the pool, look after the camp grounds, fill kerosene lanterns and fulfil any other small duties the manager would give me.

The chef there at the time was called Andy Clay, he noticed my hard work and determination and soon I started helping in the kitchen. Initially I was responsible for cooking the staff meals, as I could not speak English and had limited cooking skills. Andy noticed that I would always work in the kitchen after hours and was very keen to learn, so he very kindly sent me to English classes in Arusha. I gave the short two-week course my all, and on my return was told that I could start working in the main guest kitchen. I was so happy and that is how my cheffing career began.

Michael Matera tending the kitchen garden

Michael Matera tending the kitchen garden

What inspired you to be a chef?
I was intrigued with all the interesting produce that use to come into the kitchen. I had never seen things like lobster, prawns and other exotic seafood before and I found their shapes, smells and flavours fascinating. That is what inspired me to learn more.

What would be the highlight of your career so far?
Definitely being awarded the title of Tanzanian Chef of the Year last year. Nothing can replace that feeling!

Michael Matera tending the kitchen garden

Who is your favourite chef and why?
Gordon Ramsay. He is a very strict chef so when you see him on the TV you know you should always be careful in the kitchen.

What country would you love to travel to for cooking inspiration?
Italy! I love pasta and pizza and all the other Italian food.

The cuisine at Singita Sasakwa Lodge

The cuisine at Singita Sasakwa Lodge

What is your favourite ingredient to cook with?
Coriander, you either love it or hate it. I LOVE it.

What do you love about Singita?
I love Singita for so many different reasons but I think I love it the most because it made me the person I am today. The training, teaching, opportunities, development and love for the staff is hard to find in any other company.

Michael currently works as Senior Sous Chef at Singita Sasakwa Lodge under Executive Chef, Frank Louw. Frank says: “It’s amazing how you can learn so much from someone you are supposed to be mentor to. Michael has the wonderful talent of making every task seem effortless while still achieving extraordinary results. His calm demeanor and ability to listen has taught me a side of humanity that every person should embrace and carry with them. He has proven to not only be a phenomenal chef, student, teacher and friend but an inspiration to so many other young Tanzanians wanting to make a change in their lives.”

Catch up on all food-related posts by reading through the Cuisine category on the blog, including some delicious locally-inspired recipes!

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Unexpected Visitors at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

July 26, 2013 - Accommodation,Africa,Experience,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

One of the wonderful benefits of being in the path of the annual migration through the Serengeti is getting to observe this natural phenomenon at close range. This was especially true for our guests at Singita Sabora Tented Camp in Singita Grumeti a few weeks ago, when the herds of zebra and wildebeest joined them for lunch! These unexpected visitors were photographed by lodge manager, Wilson Owino, grazing quietly on the doorstep of the intimate, 1920s-style explorer’s camp. These beautiful shots illustrate the truly immersive safari experience at Singita, with the added thrill of knowing there isn’t much separating the comfort inside from the elements and wildlife outside.

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

The Great Migration at Singita Sabora Tented Camp

We’ve been covering this year’s migration in a series of blog posts (read part one, part two and part three) and also tracking the animals’ movements in our monthly Wildlife Reports.

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Unique Safaris: See the Serengeti on Horseback

July 16, 2013 - Africa,Experience,Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp,Singita Faru Faru Lodge,Singita Grumeti,Singita Sasakwa Lodge,Wildlife

Horseback safari at Singita Grumeti

For equestrian enthusiasts, there must be no more thrilling adventure than experiencing the great wildebeest migration on horseback. With this year’s event now in full swing, the stables at Singita Sasakwa Lodge have been extremely busy preparing our horses for daily outrides with guests to witness the influx of animals. These rides are completely tailored to guests’ needs and skill level, usually lasting several hours. In addition to the herds of plains game, it is not uncommon to spot giraffe, eland, buffalo, zebra and elephant on these rides.

Horseback safari at Singita Grumeti

For the more experienced riders, our tailored Equestrian Safaris combine long rides exploring remote areas of Grumeti Reserves with wonderfully relaxing afternoons. The exclusivity of the concession means that your experience is sure to be unique and private; just you, your magnificent horse, expert guide and the enchanting Serengeti all around you.

Horseback safari at Singita Grumeti

Horseback safari at Singita Grumeti

Moving on horseback allows you to penetrate herds of zebra and giraffe, travelling among them as if part of the group. Combine Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp with a stay at one of our permanent lodges, Sasakwa or Faru Faru, to gain the ultimate Serengeti horseback experience. Singita Explore is the perfect base for days of remote exploration and a truly immersive bush adventure, while the luxury of Sasakwa and Faru Faru offer the heights of style and relaxation.

Horseback safari at Singita Grumeti

The pace is moderate with the opportunity for faster paced canters in places, and a choice of English, Western or South African trail saddles. The magnificent herd, mainly comprising Thoroughbreds and Boerperds from South Africa, Kenya and Zimbabwe, have been carefully selected for their temperament and range between 15.1 and 16.3 hands in height.

Horseback safari at Singita Grumeti

The equestrian manager and guide will be happy to discuss any further horse riding related details; please e-mail enquires@singita.com or visit our website for more.

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