Category Archives: Safari

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014: Part Two

January 30, 2015 - Experience,Safari,Wildlife

Hippo by Ross Couper | Singita Kruger National Park

In yesterday’s post we shared the highlights from our monthly Wildlife Journals from the first half of 2014. These diary entries, penned by our field guides in the bush, document the fascinating flora and fauna found across Singita’s concessions in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. They are filled with interesting sightings, unusual animals and amusing anecdotes (just look at these bounding baboons!), and illustrated with their own stunning photographs. Here are some of the most memorable stories from July to December:

JULY – SINGITA KRUGER NATIONAL PARK (SOUTH AFRICA)

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

On the 11th of July we had a sighting that was so unusual that we could hardly believe our ears when it came over the radio. Clement had found and called in members of the Shishangaan pride with cubs, but one of the cubs was just a little different. He is snow white!

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report – July 2014
Read all Wildlife Reports from the region here: Singita Kruger National Park

AUGUST – SINGITA SABI SAND (SOUTH AFRICA)

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

The Sabi Sand has always been famous for its excellent leopard viewing, with a good number of relaxed or habituated leopards existing in this area. These wonderfully adaptable carnivores can, of course, exist in just about any habitat where there is food and cover. Having claimed that the Sabi Sand boasts excellent leopard viewing, I would not for a moment suggest that finding leopards here is easy, and nor would I ever take a leopard sighting for granted. Indeed, one can sometimes spend days searching for a leopard without success, and with guest expectations high, the pressure on guides and trackers can really mount!

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report – August 2014
Read all Wildlife Reports from the region here: Singita Sabi Sand

SEPTEMBER – SINGITA PAMUSHANA (ZIMBABWE)

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

As the first rays of light lit the landscape on World Rhino Day (22 September) we chose to explore an area that our well-protected rhinos seem to prefer. We were hugely rewarded with the very first sighting of the drive being a family of six white rhinos that were just waking up from their night’s rest in an open grassy area.

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report – September 2014
Read all Wildlife Reports from the region here: Singita Pamushana

OCTOBER – SINGITA GRUMETI (TANZANIA)

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Just like the three previous months, the first half of October was characterised by lots of game all over the concession. Large herds of migratory zebra continued to slowly move through the area, as well as pockets of a few thousand wildebeest. The migratory animals joined hundreds of topi on the Sabora Plains. The topi calving season that began in late September continued into October, and multitudes of tiny calves dotted the herds throughout the plains.

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report – October 2014
Read all Wildlife Reports from the region here: Singita Grumeti

NOVEMBER – SINGITA SABI SAND (SOUTH AFRICA)

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

With our ever-growing elephant population in the Sabi Sands that forms part of the Greater Kruger National Park, there is always the question of how their numbers are being controlled in a confined area, even with the conserved area as large as it is. I have included a few quotes from Dr Sam Ferreira, SANParks’ large mammal ecologist, in this article. This is the most recent information available on the population control within the area of Kruger National Park and Sabi Sand.

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report – November 2014
Read all Wildlife Reports from the region here: Singita Sabi Sand

DECEMBER – SINGITA PAMUSHANA (ZIMBABWE)

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

Highlights from our Wildlife Reports 2014 - Singita

The most astonishing, frightening and incredible sighting of my career… My hands trembled as I grabbed my 400 mm lens and my 1.4 convertor and fitted them to the camera body. While doing this and trying to stay calm I could tell from the sounds that these two highly endangered, rarely observed and very aggressive animals were not having a swim – they were having the battle to end all battles. Both were bulls – the one much bigger than the other. They fought in the water and on the bank. Their thundering feet shook the earth and their bellowing cries echoed off the sandstone walls and amplified over the water.

Read the full Wildlife Report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report – December 2014
Read all Wildlife Reports from the region here: Singita Pamushana

Don’t forget to read yesterday’s post for great stories and photos from the first half of last year, or visit our website to see all the Wildlife Reports from 2014.

Read More


Sunrise in the Serengeti

December 12, 2014 - Experience,Safari,Singita Explore,Singita Faru Faru Lodge,Singita Grumeti,Singita Mara River Tented Camp,Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Sunrise in the Serengeti

For some people, the day begins when the train passes by in the distance or a high-pitched alarm pierces the early morning quiet. They get moving with a cup of takeaway coffee, absent-mindedly scanning the morning paper, getting stuck into their email inbox or dodging traffic on the way to the office.

Sunrise in the Serengeti

Sunrise in the Serengeti

The mornings at Singita are a little bit different. The drone of cars, the ping of cellphones and the whoosh of the espresso machine are replaced by the chatter of birds and the far-off cry of a scavenging hyena. The resident Cape buffalo grunts with contentment as he scratches against his favorite rubbing post shortly before sunrise, then slips away quietly to find a shady spot to rest for the day.

Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Ambling to the main lodge with the cool morning air in your face, damp earth disturbed by little paws and fresh spoor on the road is the only evidence of evening visitors. Arriving at the lodge one normally finds a scrub hare getting the last of his fill on the dew-spangled lawn before dashing to the lavender bushes to hide for the day.

Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Singita Sasakwa Lodge

The well-rested guests faces are filled with anticipation as they chat excitedly on the veranda while the sun peeps over the horizon in the east, a million miles away from the hustle and bustle of city life. The babblers and hornbills hop about the lodge, signalling that it is indeed time to rise and shine. When the vervet monkeys start stretching their legs on the lawn playing rough and tumble, our guests set off in the open game-viewing vehicles to enjoy a slow bumble across the plains.

Singita Sasakwa Lodge

Brad Murray, Lodge Manager at Singita Sasakwa Lodge in Grumeti, Tanzania, describes an average morning for him and his team. Stylish and graceful, the turn-of-the-century manor house and private cottages at Singita Sasakwa Lodge are a blend of authentic European style and East African influences, and surrounded by breathtaking vistas of the Serengeti plains. View our gallery or watch this stunning video of the lodge to see more.

Read More


Tanzania’s Serengeti – A Year-Round Destination

October 22, 2014 - Experience,Lodges and Camps,Safari,Singita Explore,Singita Faru Faru Lodge,Singita Grumeti,Singita Mara River Tented Camp,Singita Sabora Tented Camp,Singita Sasakwa Lodge,Singita Serengeti House,Wildlife

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

The Serengeti in Tanzania is inextricably associated with the annual wildebeest migration in the imagination of most travellers in search of the ultimate African safari. However, once the wildebeest have moved on in their perpetual search for grazing, the Serengeti offers diverse and fascinating game viewing, from big predators to prolific prey, on its vast open plains and along its river banks.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

Warm and fairly dry, January to March is a great time to visit the region with large herds of topi, zebra, eland, giraffe and Thompson’s gazelle starting to gather on the open plains. This is also the calving season and thousands of these animals, including big herds of wildebeest that stay behind, give birth over a period of a few weeks.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

The concentrated herds attract the attention of predators, especially the big cats, and sightings of leopard and lion are common. Scattered rain showers freshen up warm days and produce bright green landscapes and crisp, clear skies conducive to beautiful photography. As it’s the end of the dry season, the Mara and Grumeti rivers start to recede forcing the animals to congregate close to available water sources which makes them easier to find.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

The months of April and May are known as the season of the long rains, transforming the landscape as lush, longer grasses grow and rivers, lakes and pans start to fill up with water again. Large herds of herbivores, including significant breeding herds of elephant and buffalo, are common sightings. During this time, throughout the Serengeti there is greater exclusivity at wildlife sightings and increased flexibility when it comes to planning itineraries.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

By May there is a sense of anticipation in the Serengeti as the migration could arrive at any time to seek dependable water sources and start grazing on the long, golden grasslands. Industry insiders consider it to be the most underrated month to visit with fewer people, prolific game sightings and mild, sunny days ideal for bush walks and picnics.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

The dry season commences again in June and continues until the end of October. Considered high season in Tanzania, it is characterised by pleasantly warm, sunny days and easy game viewing due to the short grasses. September and October are fantastic months in the Lamai, with multiple daily Mara River migration crossings, increased predator action and excellent crocodile, hippo and hyena sightings.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

In September and October, diverse game congregates along the Grumeti River and in pans, while river crossings by thousands of wildebeest and other migratory plains game are always a thrilling sight. October is Singita head guide Ryan Schmitt’s best time of the year in the Serengeti, due to the all-round excellent game viewing.

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

Tanazina's Serengeti - A Year-Round Destination

The short rains in November and December are characterised by brief, spectacular thunderstorms that give way to clear skies and amazing colour contrasts for photography. Awesome cheetah and lion sightings are common, there are large numbers of babies and youngsters amongst both predator and prey species, and migratory birds return to the newly green landscapes.

Discover the Serengeti through our monthly Wildlife Reports, which are written by the field guides themselves, and describe thrilling wildlife sightings, beautiful landscapes and unusual species. Please contact our Reservations team to find out more about visiting our six lodges and camps in Tanzania.

Read More


Highlights from our Wildlife Reports

October 20, 2014 - Safari,Wildlife

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita

The next best thing to being in the bush yourself has to be catching up on the monthly Wildlife Reports, written and photographed by our field guides. Staggering landscapes, noteworthy sightings, thrilling kills and – our personal favourite – updates on the latest little newborns, fill the pages of these journals. Here is a recap of the latest stories straight from the bush:

Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Pamushana
We have a couple of sunken photographic hides at various pans on the property, but the most popular in the last
month has been the one at Whata Pan. The hide offers the most amazing opportunities to observe animals that are usually shy of human presence. For example, a family of warthogs trotted in with great speed and enthusiasm and were the noisiest visitors by far, signalling their arrival with a fanfare of snorks, snorts and grunts.

Written and photographed by Jenny Hishin. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Pamushana Wildlife Report September 2014

Singita Grumeti, Tanzania

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Grumeti
If August was ‘big zebra’ month, September must go down as ‘big cat’ month. It was a great month for predator activity and guests witnessed several hunts and kills. September also saw thousands of wildebeest moving through
the concession, mostly in a south and westerly direction into the Serengeti National Park.

Report by By Stuart Levine. Photos by Alfred Ngwarai, Braya Masunga and Joe Kibwe. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Grumeti Wildlife Report September 2014

Singita Kruger National Park, South Africa

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Kruger National Park
There were 99 separate lion sightings in August. The Mountain Pride seem to have moved out of the guarri thickets around the northern areas and are spending most of their time out the concession near the Gudzane East windmill. The Xhirombe Pride male seems to have taken on a companion male and one of the male cubs was moving on his own along the river for half the month, scavenging off the male leopard.

Report by Danie Vermeulen and Nick du Plessis. Photos by Nick du Plessis and Barry Peiser. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Kruger National Park Wildlife Report August 2014

Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Sabi Sand
As the lioness got closer the larger male hippo started thrashing the water with his head, gaping and defecating – all signs of aggression to indicate to the lioness that he wanted her to move out of his comfort zone. But she moved closer, with a bit more caution, and wasn’t deterred from taking a long drink. The rest of the pride took courage from this and approached the edge of the water.

Report by Mark Broodryk, Leon van Wyk, Crystal Perry, Dave Steyn, Francois Fourie and Andy Gabor. Photos by Ross Couper, Andy Gibor and Dave Steyn. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Sabi Sand Wildlife Report August 2014

Singita Lamai, Tanzania

Monthly Wildlife Reports from Singita Lamai
The Great Migration arrived in Lamai at the end of June and the wildebeest were a continuous presence throughout July. August did not disappoint either as the herds remained in the general vicinity, crossing north and south and north again across the Mara River, in the surrounds of Singita Mara River Tented Camp. Guests enjoyed 12 dramatic crossings during the month. One particularly exciting crossing happened right in front of the camp, and lasted for over 20 minutes.

Report by By Lizzie Hamrick. Photos by Ryan Schmitt and Evan Visconti. Download the full wildlife report here: Singita Lamai Wildlife Report August 2014

Read More


Recent Facebook Highlights

September 19, 2014 - Experience,Lodges and Camps,Sabi Sand,Safari,Wildlife

Singita’s Facebook community has always been an active space where guests and fans share their thoughts and memories alongside beautiful snapshots by our rangers in the bush. In particular, there have been a number of stunning wildlife photos posted by field guide Ross Couper from Singita Sabi Sand recently that have been shared far and wide. Here is a brief selection:

facebook_7

A pack of wild dog entertained each other, whilst guests watched in awe at the social interactions taking place. A perfect spring morning.

facebook_6

A tender moment of an elephant calf that was deserted and shortly afterwards adopted by another female elephant.

facebook_5

Confident, self assured, tranquil – a few words that come to mind whilst watching the Nyeleti male leopard grooming himself.

Facebook Highlights - Singita - Copyright Ross Couper

A young male leopard keeps attentive to his surroundings as the afternoon light fades to darkness.

You can see more of Singita Sabi Sand’s wildlife and landscapes in this “week in the life” video, shot by another of our talented field guides, Dylan Brandt:

Follow us on Facebook and join 13 000 other wildlife lovers who get regular updates from all twelve lodges in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. One such example is this incredible face-off between a hippo and a pride of lions, captured by a guest.

Read More


Creatures Great & Small: The Giant Snail

September 09, 2014 - Did You Know?,Experience,Sabi Sand,Safari,Wildlife

Giant snail

With the green vegetation sprouting along the roadsides and over the grasslands, creatures from large to small are on the move. A few days ago, and within minutes of leaving the lodge, we noticed movement on the road. A giant African land snail glistened in the morning light.

Like almost all pulmonate gastropods, these snails are hermaphrodites, having male and female sex organs. Although giant African land snails primarily mate with one another, in more isolated regions they are capable of reproducing on their own. Giant African land snails lay around six clutches of eggs every year, laying an average of 200 eggs per clutch – that amounts to about 1 200 eggs per year! What is really incredible is that around 90% of snail hatchings survive.

Giant African land snails are active during the night and spend the daytime hours safely buried underground. They reach their adult size by the time they are six months old and although their growth rate slows at this point, they never stop growing. Most reach between five and six years of age but some individuals have been known to be more than ten years old. The giant African land snail seals itself inside its shell to retain water. They do this about three times a year, depending on the areas which they inhabit. During periods of extreme drought, they practice aestivation which is a type of ‘summer sleep’.

Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa

Driving along looking in various directions for a twitch of an ear or a flicking tail, your eyes scan through the bush up and down, left and right. Often when looking for something large and obvious you miss the smaller treasures, without even realising it.

This description of an encounter with a giant snail by Ross Couper first appeared in the November 2013 Wildlife Report from Singita Sabi Sand. The monthly ranger diaries are written by the field guides themselves and contain plenty of delightful stories and stunning photographs from the bush. You can catch up on the Wildlife Reports from all the Singita lodges and camps here.

Read More


A Visit from Matador Network

July 22, 2014 - Accommodation,Experience,Kruger National Park,Lodges and Camps,Safari,Singita Lebombo Lodge,Singita Sweni Lodge

The lodges at Singita Kruger National Park recently received a visit from Ross Borden and Scott Sporleder of Matador Network, an independent online travel community. They documented their stay in this article on the site, accompanied by some gorgeous photographs we wanted to share with you:

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

The rooms at the Lebombo lodge are spread across a ridge that runs right down to a major river in the park. We stayed at one of the suites pictured here, which looks out directly over the river. Although it’s a longer walk to and from reception, the sights and sounds of wildlife at the river made it feel like we were out on a game drive even during downtime at the room.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

One of the many dozens of elephants we saw in our four days at Singita Kruger National Park.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Although every guide at Singita carries a rifle in each Land Rover and wears a belt full of bullets, they’re never used. Each guide brings a wealth of knowledge to the table regarding animal behaviour and how to stay safe in the bush.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

A roof of one of the suites at Singita Lebombo Lodge looking out on the river below.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Like the common spaces at every Singita property, the suites are all super stylish, but the real genius of these rooms is their isolation from each other and the privacy guests enjoy.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Somehow they’ve spaced each room out from the next so that each guest room has complete privacy from other guests and staff, as well as an individual and intimate connection to the surrounding nature.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Singita guests wait for a female cheetah to show them the speed and grace of an evening hunt.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Between each game drive you’ll be treated to an amazing lunch, and if you get too hot by the pool you can read a book in the shade or take a dip.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

And just when you thought the luxury service couldn’t get any better, your guide and tracker will stop the vehicle during each evening game drive and set up a cocktail bar right there in the middle of the bush. Snacks and cocktails surrounded by wildlife… magic.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Did you know a large group of zebras is called a “dazzle”?

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Making eye contact with one of the young, hungry-looking male lions only a few feet away from your open-top vehicle can be quite a moment.

Matador Network visits Singita Kruger National Park

Scott and Ross with Field Guide, Enos, and tracker, Sunday

Matador is an independent media company that launched in 2006 with the vision for a travel site and community based on the the real cultures, people, and places they encounter. You can see their photos from Singita Sabi Sand on the site and watch a beautiful video of their experience on their YouTube channel.

Read More


Update: The Great Migration 2014

July 04, 2014 - Experience,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

This time of year at Singita Grumeti is always very exciting for guests and staff alike, as millions of wildebeest and other plains game move through the Serengeti on their annual migration. The low rumble of hooves started very early this year, beginning in early May; six weeks before it was expected. Field Guide Elizabeth Hamrick reports from Tanzania:

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

“The 2014 ‘long rains’ saw little precipitation at Singita Grumeti, but while our location in the Northwestern Serengeti had very little rain, the central Serengeti saw almost none. The result of the extreme lack of rain was a lack of suitable grasses so when the wildebeest left Ndutu in the southern Serengeti at the end of March, the 80km trip through to Singita Grumeti (which usually takes about three months) only took one month. By the first of the month, the Ikorongo Game Reserve was full of at least 50,000 wildebeest. Within the next two days, wildebeest in the multiple hundreds of thousands engulfed Singita Grumeti; the Great Migration had arrived.

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

By the end of the month the herds started forming long lines, marching eastwards out of the reserve and by about the 5th of June only the weak and the wounded remained.

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

There are currently herds scattered about 1.5km south of Singita Mara River Tented Camp in the Lamai Triangle, and we have also received reports that a big chunk of the migration has turned south again, and are hanging out in the central Serengeti. 2014 continues to prove how unpredictable this phenomenon can be, and we wait in anticipation to see what happens next.”

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Grumeti

Guests at Singita Mara River Tented Camp were also lucky enough to witness the first crossing this week from start to finish. It occurred a short way from the camp near the Kogatende airstrip and lasted close to an hour!

The Great Migration 2014 at Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Elizabeth compiles a monthly Wildlife Report from Singita Grumeti, which is situated adjacent to the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. You san see Instagram photos from our guests who visit the region with the hashtag #singitagrumeti and follow us on Instagram here.

Read More


Say Hello to the Butamtam Lion Cubs!

June 13, 2014 - Conservation,Experience,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

These pictures hardly need a caption – we would be surprised if you could tear your eyes away from their little furry faces long enough to read it! If you are interested however, you may like to know that these gorgeous young lions are offspring of the Butamtam pride at Singita Grumeti in Tanzania. These lions are healthy breeders; over the past two years one of the major prides got so big that it split into two, and two of the other prides seem to be heading in the same direction. In addition, all of their cubs have higher than usual survival rates which is wonderful to hear.

The Butamtam lion cubs at Singita Grumeti by Ryan Schmitt

The Butamtam lion cubs at Singita Grumeti by Ryan Schmitt

butamtam_cubs_3

Photos by Field Guide Ryan Schmitt. Ryan regularly posts snapshots from his adventures in the bush on our Facebook and Instagram feeds so follow us there to see more!

Read More


The Migration 2014 Arrives at Singita Grumeti

May 20, 2014 - Community Development,Conservation,Experience,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Singita Sasakwa Lodge,Wildlife

It’s that time of year again! The wildebeest have started arriving on the Sasakwa Plains of the Serengeti and the herds seem to be multiplying at an astonishing rate with each passing day. Overnight, the grassland below Singita Sasakwa Lodge has been flooded by tens of thousands of wildebeest, making for some very exciting horseback game-spotting for our lucky guests.

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

The Great Migration 2014 | Singita Grumeti

Singita Grumeti, situated adjacent to the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, is an integral part of the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem, the home of the Great Migration. Singita manages 350,000 acres of this land, and generates the funds necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of the reserve via low impact tourism. Visit our website to find out more about our conservation and community development projects in the area.

Read More


Sign up to receive the Singita newsletter

×