Category Archives: Lodges and Camps

Design Details: Singita Mara River Tented Camp

March 24, 2014 - Accommodation,Experience,Lamai,Lodges and Camps,Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

In the design of Singita Mara River Tented Camp the focus was on creating an immersive experience at the famed river crossing point for the annual migration. The look and feel, conceptualised by Cécile & Boyd, is a profound celebration of contemporary African design and offers a sense of laid back luxury.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

The camp draws inspiration from its East African location, but with a feeling of bohemian glamour that seeks to balance form and function in a non-traditional way. This creates an visual ambience that is elegant but relaxed, with an industrial metal frame work in black hammorite, hung with beige tents and then lined inside in cool white cotton canvas walls and ceilings. Wooden decks and basket walls and roofs tie the camp to the site in a delicate and respectful way, ensuring that it touches the earth lightly.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

As part of their interpretation of the vision for the camp, GAPP Architects & Urban Designers created generous ‘fitto’ screens that provide shade for the outdoor dining and lounge areas, and suspended sapling walls are strategically placed the define the space and offering privacy for our guests. The tents are positioned on the edge of ‘hovering’ decks, so that one is slightly elevated, maximising the views and creating separate living areas on different levels. Fly sheets allow guests to enjoy the space and also to sleep with the main tent flaps open, while protected from inquisitive insects.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Strong contemporary design puts a fresh spin on local creativity, with inspiration coming from traditional, everyday African objects like baskets, beads and pots. There has been a distinct focus on sourcing the talented work of young inspiring African designers. The camp’s signature colour palette of camel, red, grey and charcoal has been incorporated into various decor items and furniture pieces, and live alongside timber sculptures carved from single pieces of wood. Similarly, wooden turned lights, whose shapes are derived from African pots and then extruded to form the various shapes, are expressed in a contemporary form. The lights are manufactured from sustainable jacaranda wood, while others are made of papier-mâché.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Deep, low-slung sofas and beds are layered in hand spun natural fabrics, throws and cushions of differing weights from heavy sack to sheer muslin voiles. ‘Campaign’ inspired retro travel chests in canvas and raw leather with polished metal detailing create desks, trousseaux and side tables. The relaxed atmosphere is further enhanced with bamboo cutlery, wonky crockery and wobbly glass, wood raffia and huge linen napkins bound in plaited rings.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Extensive use of sustainably sourced, hand crafted African basket ware lends a contemporary but tactile element to the design. For example the wire baskets on the screen near the pool are the exact shape and design of grain sorting baskets, but constructed in wire so that they evolve into a purely decorative element. Baskets used for filtering traditional beer have been painted and hung in a group to form an art work.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

The culture and heritage of neighbouring Masai and local Kuria tribes inspired the jewel-like colours of red, black and blue, while their use of pattern and natural materials heavily influenced the design. Throughout the interior there are items of interest to inspire the guests to see this creativity in a new way and invite the staff to share stories of how African culture and design has been interpreted in a new way.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Internal bathrooms with generous open shower areas and vanity units offer incredible views through a folded-back tent flap towards the river. In the outdoor bathroom, the tub is perfectly positioned to take full advantage of the gorgeous river view while offering total privacy. Beds face eastwards so that the rising sun acts as a natural alarm clock in the early morning, and refreshments are taken on the decks to catch the cooling breeze… the experience is designed to allow the guest to fully engage in this indescribable location.

Singita Mara River Tented Camp is the epitome of sustainable tourism and consciously seeks to eliminate the unnecessary use of energy and non-biodegradable materials. In keeping with this philosophy, the camp operates “off-the-grid” and relies entirely on a custom designed solar system for its power and the use of recycled and natural materials wherever possible. Contact our reservations team to find out more about visiting this untouched wilderness.

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Guest Feedback: Seeing the Serengeti on Horseback

March 19, 2014 - Experience,Lodges and Camps,Safari,Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp,Singita Grumeti

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

There can be few more thrilling experiences in life than discovering the vast plains of the Serengeti on horseback; the surreal romance and excitement of exploring the exquisite wilderness of this unique area at eye level with the wildlife. Singita’s day rides and longer equestrian safaris allow guests to journey across the open plains with a herd of zebra or giraffe, bringing them truly in touch with the pulse of Africa. A recent regulation passed by the Tanzanian government now allows Singita’s equestrian safaris to traverse the full breadth and width of the concession, adding even more opportunities for unique game spotting and the discovery of more remote areas of the reserve.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

David and Paula Evans traveled to Singita Grumeti from the United States last year and were so moved by the experience that they sent this kind note of thanks to Jason Trollip, Singita’s Tourism Manager for the region.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

David writes:

The purpose of this e-mail is two-fold.

First, to compliment Singita on what my wife, Paula, and I could only describe as a holiday of lifetime – made possible largely by the unstinting professionalism, charm and dedication of your on-site teams.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Whilst not wanting to decry the unbelievable quality and attention to detail in all that Singita Sasakwa Lodge and Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp we stayed at displayed in abundance, for us it was the people on the ground that made all the difference.

I would particularly single out Ali and Martin (at the Equestrian Centre) and Nick (at Explore).

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Our four-day horseback safari provided us with a series of unforgettable and quite unique moments. From the unquestionable quality of the horses, to the professionalism, skill and knowledge of Martin and Ali, these were four days we will never forget. All this topped off with Martin and Ali’s entertaining and witty company. It was also an unexpected honour to be the first guests to enter one of the reserves on horseback following the new permission recently issued by the government. For advanced riders and repeat guests, having these extra areas to explore is important we feel, given the amount of ground that can be covered on horseback. To us this is an added incentive to return!

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

Sheer bliss – an experience we are desperate to repeat.

And now to Singita Explore. Paula and I have been very fortunate in life to stay at some of the best hotels/resorts in the world – we haven’t held back! But I can safely say that what Nick and the team provided us with rivalled the best – all with the challenges of being in the depths of the Serengeti. Quite remarkable. Nick was an incredible host and you could see he would do just anything to ensure your every need is catered for. A real star.

Horse riding safari in the Serengeti | Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camp

So – we thank you all; we will be back.

I would close by saying that never before have we felt the urge to send an e-mail in such glowing terms following a holiday. You should all be very proud of what you have accomplished at Singita Grumeti.

Regards
David and Paula Evans

Our sincere thanks to David and Paula for taking the time to write this letter of appreciation. We very much look forward to welcoming you both back to Singita Grumeti!

All photos © 2013 David Evans

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Architecture & Inspiration: An interview with Singita architect Sally Tsiliyiannis

January 20, 2014 - Accommodation,Experience,Lodges and Camps,Sabi Sand,Singita Castleton

Singita Castleton

Singita Castleton

Formerly the family home of Singita founder Luke Bailes’ grandfather, Singita Castleton is an exclusive-use lodge that has recently been transformed into a charming hideaway catering specifically to groups and families. The property comprises a stone-walled ‘homestead’ and a series of beautifully appointed, air-conditioned double en-suite cottages, offering a unique, private villa experience in the heart of the bush.

Singita Castleton

Set within 45,000 acres of private reserve, Singita Castleton has been designed to combine the best elements of a private safari lodge with the rustic charms of a country farmhouse, with the added benefit of extensive high-end facilities, including a vast garden, swimming pool, wine cellar, gym, tennis court and spa treatment room. Guests can relax together in the courtyard, gather around the traditional ‘boma’ or meet in the country-style kitchen, yet the individual cottages allow guests to retreat to the privacy of their own space as and when it’s needed.

Singita Castleton

Architect Sally Tsiliyiannis, who is a director of the Cape Town office of GAPP Architects & Urban Designers, had the task of overseeing the painstaking restoration of the main homestead, and recently told Men’s Journal USA about the experience:

MJ: When you are working on a safari lodge, how do you make it luxurious without allowing the buildings to overwhelm their setting?
ST: The trick is to let the surroundings be in control – the luxury is already there. Ultimately it’s about making the most ordinary things seem extraordinary and, of course, throwing in all the creature comforts that guests expect.

Singita Castleton

MJ: What styles and touches do you view as uniquely African and thus worth preserving at Singita Castleton?
ST: The existing camp was steeped in history and much loved by many. Although the  existing buildings were actually quite ordinary (simple thatched cottages with small windows, screeded floors and earth coloured plastered walls), we realised the importance of retaining the essence of the place in the redesign. The key to the transformation was the opening up of spaces within and between the buildings and the introduction of new layers of texture and material to blend the buildings more subtly into the landscape. Letting in more natural light helped align the spaces closer with nature.

Singita Castleton

MJ: Which animals are the hardest to keep off the property?
ST: Elephants are the most destructive and have to be kept out of the camp – otherwise pretty much anything can wander in. Monkeys are very mischievous but their antics are irresistible.

Singita Castleton

MJ: What draws you to working in the bush?  
ST: Mostly being outside with the smell of the air and the African sun. Flying low over the bush, site meetings under the trees while elephants take mud baths nearby, the genuine, unpretentious people and the glory of the night sky.

Singita Castleton

MJ: What are the limitations of working in the bush?
ST: The bush is the most extraordinary source of inspiration so there is never a sense of there being ‘limitations’. Things just happen at a slower pace because of logistical challenges so time is inevitably in short supply.

MJ: Are there any great examples of African architecture you draw on for inspiration?
ST: The greatest architecture in Africa is the trees – I constantly use them as a source of inspiration.

You can read all about Singita Castleton’s reopening earlier this year, and see more photos of this gorgeous exclusive-use retreat on our website.

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Snapshots from Singita Lamai

November 22, 2013 - Experience,Lamai,Lodges and Camps,Safari,Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Nestled on the northern banks of the world-renowned Mara River in the Lamai triangle in Tanzania, Singita Mara River Tented Camp is the epitome of sustainable tourism. It was was built “off-the-grid”, seeking to eliminate the unnecessary use of energy and non-biodegradable materials, and relies on a custom designed solar power system and the use of only recycled and natural materials.

Singita Lamai, an area celebrated for its annual wildebeest migration crossings, covers 98,000 acres of the northern-most tip of the Serengeti National Park. This area boasts one of the highest year-round concentrations of wildlife in the Serengeti National Park, thanks to its distinctive soil composition. This includes resident plains game, big cats and elephant, in addition to enormous populations of crocodile and hippo in the Mara River.

Today we are thrilled to bring you the latest photos from the area, where Singita Field Guide Marlon du Toit is currently adventuring. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for regular updates over the next few days, as Marlon explores Singita’s lodges and camps in Tanzania.

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

Singita Lamai | Marlon du Toit

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Singita Castleton Reopens

October 07, 2013 - Accommodation,Experience,Lodges and Camps,Sabi Sand,Singita Castleton

Singita Castleton - main house

For many years, Singita Castleton, situated in the heart of South Africa’s Sabi Sand Game Reserve, was the family home of Singita founder Luke Bailes’ grandfather. The property was later transformed into a charming hideaway catering specifically to groups and families, comprising a stone-walled ‘homestead’ and a series of beautifully appointed, air-conditioned double en-suite cottages.

In keeping with Singita’s trend-leading evolution towards a new style of exclusive safari experience, Singita Castleton has undergone a total renovation, taking private rental to a new level of luxury and comfort. The result is a private villa experience in the heart of the bush where guests can share in the communal living spaces of the main house, with the option to retreat to one of six individual cottages within the grounds for complete privacy. Singita Castleton truly encapsulates a sense of exclusivity within exclusivity.

Swimming pool - Singita Castleton

Set within 45,000 acres of private reserve, Singita Castleton is steeped in history, capturing the spirit of the original Castleton house, and giving the lodge a historical and comforting nature. It has been designed to combine the best elements of a private safari lodge with the rustic charms of a country farmhouse, with the added benefit of extensive high-end facilities, including a vast garden, swimming pool, wine cellar, gym, tennis court and spa treatment room.

Guests can relax together in the courtyard, gather around the traditional ‘boma’ or meet in the country-style kitchen, yet the individual cottages allow guests to retreat to the privacy of their own space as and when it’s needed. All of this is overlooking a waterhole where animals regularly gather to drink.

Bathroom - Singita Castleton

Décor is rich throughout with splashes of colour contrasting with traditional tartans and classic prints. Botanical art references, country furniture and flagstone floors also add a nostalgic, relaxed ambience to the lodge, which comes complete with a private guide, tracker, housekeeper and chef. The former Senior Sous Chef at Singita Lebombo Lodge in Kruger National Park, Chef Calum Anderson, will head up the kitchen at Castleton.

The Sabi Sand Game Reserve borders the Kruger National Park in northeast South Africa. It is the oldest private reserve in the country and is recognised globally for its formidable concentration of the big five, especially frequent leopard sightings.

To ensure the Singita experience is truly unrivalled, Singita Castleton can easily be combined with Singita Sweni Lodge in neighbouring Kruger National Park – a tranquil sanctuary flanking the Sweni River and also available for private rental for up to 12 guests – or Singita Pamushana Lodge, situated in the south east of Zimbabwe, with sensational views over the Malilangwe dam and sandstone hills.

Bedroom - Singita Castleton

Singita Castleton is only available on an exclusive-use basis. For further information please visit our website, or to make a reservation, please contact enquiries@singita.com

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Wonderful Zulu Weaving at Singita Boutique & Galleries

May 01, 2013 - Community Development,Lodges and Camps

Traditional Zulu weavers create beautiful underplates for Singita's lodges

Visitors to all of Singita’s lodges and camps are treated to a daily feast of locally-grown produce and inspired traditional fare from our industrious kitchen teams. Our elegant cuisine is no doubt one of the highlights for our guests, but another common talking point among them is the spectacular table settings at each meal.

Taking pride of place among these are exquisitely hand-crafted wire underplates, expertly created by a group of Zulu weavers in Durban, South Africa. These talented ladies work with Singita designers to develop unique designs and colour palettes for each lodge that echo the distinctive style and environment of that property. These designs are then interpreted by local crafters who create these striking, handmade objets d’art which are also available for sale at each of the Singita Boutique & Galleries.

zuluweavers_3

Behind these beautifully woven objects is a story of hope and inspiration, and a shining example of one of the many successful community partnerships that are central to Singita’s philosophy of giving back. We hold a series of workshops to teach unemployed women from both urban and rural areas how to weave the underplate designs, that are both modern works of art and practical to use at home.

Traditional Zulu weavers create beautiful underplates for Singita's lodges

Our signature tableware line is continually growing by utilizing the skills of these Zulu weavers who also create napkin rings, bread baskets and drinks coasters. Singita table accessories are manufactured to the highest quality standards, are eco-friendly and fairly traded, ensuring sustainable incomes for more than 350 home-based craft producers in four different communities.

The hand-woven under plates in the dining room at Singita Ebony Lodge

Hand-woven wire underplates at Singita Pamushana Lodge

Find out more about our community projects by reading these blog posts, or visiting the Community section of our new website.

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The Great Migration

April 10, 2013 - Africa,Environment,Experience,Lodges and Camps,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

Talented photographer and experienced Field Guide, James Suter, spent the better part of a year exploring Singita’s lodges and camps in Southern Africa. Towards the end of 2012, he visited Singita Grumeti in Tanzania and was lucky enough to experience part of the world-famous animal migration through the Serengeti.

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

One of the most popular attractions for visitors to East Africa is the annual migration of hundreds of thousands of zebra and over a million wildebeest and other plains game who follow the rains for more than 1800 miles. Witnessing this natural phenomenon as the animals move through the Serengeti is truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience, especially since Singita Grumeti offers the perfect vantage point from which to view “The Greatest Wildlife Show on Earth”.

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

From December to March, Northern Tanzania is home to massive herds of wildebeest who give birth to roughly 500 000 calves over a period of just three weeks in a remarkable, synchronised event. The main reason for this is that very young calves are more noticeable to predators when mixed with older calves and therefore make for easier prey.

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

The month of July is the ideal time to visit Singita Grumeti, as this is roughly when the herds reach their first major obstacle and are forced to navigate across the Grumeti River. The western corridor of the Serengeti National Park – Africa’s No. 1 World Heritage Site - is where the action takes place and is the best place to watch the migration unfold.

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

The Great Migration - Singita Grumeti - Tanzania

We spent some time at Singita Grumeti in September and were blown away by the sheer numbers of game and the large herds of wildebeest. We drove out onto the vast plains and watched while a hundred thousand of the animals advanced slowly towards the game vehicle. The sights, sounds and smells were mesmerising and completely unforgettable.

There are six Singita lodges and camps to visit in Tanzania, including the brand new Singita Serengeti House, an exclusive-use retreat on the slopes of Sasakwa Hill. To learn more about Singita Grumeti and Lamai, read more on our blog or catch up on the monthly wildlife journals from the region.

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Singita Serengeti House: Cécile & Boyd’s Interiors

March 27, 2013 - Accommodation,Experience,Lodges and Camps,Singita Grumeti,Singita Serengeti House

Singita Serengeti House lounge

Singita Serengeti House, in the vast Grumeti Reserves in Tanzania, was opened earlier this year as an exclusive-use retreat, and in response to a growing demand from discerning travellers for privacy and flexibility. Its unique position in the heart of the Serengeti, offers breathtaking vistas from the slopes of Sasakwa Hill across the endless, open plains of this untouched wilderness. Top South Africa design team, Cécile & Boyd’s, crafted the exquisite interiors and have been involved in the conceptualisation of every one of our lodges and camps since Singita Ebony Lodge opened in 1993.

Singita Serengeti House details

Singita Serengeti House bedroom

While what lies outside is rather spectacular, the interiors of Singita Serengeti House are also something to behold. Throughout the house, ample indoor and outdoor lounging and dining areas, all with uninterrupted views, provide relaxing spaces for guests to truly immerse themselves in the beauty of the surrounding landscape while enjoying each other’s company. A cool neutral palette of subtle, sun-bleached colours mimics the Serengeti grass plains, bringing the outside in.

Singita Serengeti House details

Singita Serengeti House interiors

Mirror is used throughout the house to maximise light and space. Humble materials in natural fibres, rattan, grass matting, polished cement floors, bleached, raw timbers and local stones bring an honest, earthy feel to the understatedly glamorous, boldly proportioned, light-saturated rooms curated with a modern African art collection by Kurt Pio and Sarah Pratt, artefacts and objects, and anthropologically relevant tribal sculpture. All the decorative pieces were designed and commissioned or sourced by Cécile & Boyd’s, including witty eye-catching papier-mâché hunting trophies and leather thong chandeliers inspired by Masai skirts.

Singita Serengeti House interiors

Singita Serengeti House dining room

All the suites have spacious bathrooms designed as luxurious extensions to the bedroom and living areas, with outdoor showers and private terraces. The private kitchen and resident chef caters exclusively to the needs of the party staying in the house, taking into consideration everything from individual food allergies to favourite cooking styles and flavours. Delicious food and an excellent wine cellar always forms an integral part of the Singita experience, and meals are carefully planned and orchestrated from candle-lit gourmet dinners to informal picnics in the bush.

You can see more photographs of this incredible property in this blog post, or read the online brochure for more. Please contact enquiries@singita.com for further details on booking the house for a group of family and friends.

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The Singita School of Cooking

February 20, 2013 - Community Development,Cuisine,Experience,Kruger National Park,Lodges and Camps

Joyful and her classmates at the Singita School of Cooking Joyful and her classmates at the Singita School of Cooking

Life at Singita is a constant exercise in gratitude for the environment and the people that make the lodges so incredibly unique. Singita is the custodian of over half a million acres of natural bush in Africa and works actively to protect and maintain this land and its wildlife in their original state.  We partner with the people who live on the outskirts of the reserves to understand the intrinsic value of these pristine areas and experience the benefit of preserving the land for future generations.  Singita and the people from local communities are working symbiotically to provide a better experience for the eco-traveler, whilst ensuring a better future for the land, the wildlife and communities within each region.

 

This story is the first in a series which will offer some insight into the genuine upliftment, improvements, restoration, heart-warming successes and joy brought about by caring and the daily miracles that keep unfolding to transform lives, largely thanks to the people who visit our lodges and are committed to making a difference.

Joyful Nghala, like all intelligent and aspirant young girls, matriculated from high school with dreams of a golden future. The realities of living in a part of South Africa with rampant unemployment soon hit home however, and she was forced to find work that didn’t promise much prospect. Despite her having to work in less than inspiring jobs, Joyful never lost the wonderful spirit for which she is so appropriately named.

A chance stroll to the local post office gave Joyful the lucky break she had been longing for. It was there that she spotted the advertisement encouraging interested parties to apply for places at the Singita School of Cooking (SSC). Joyful duly applied and successfully navigated two tough interviews and a cook-off to receive an invitation to attend the school, where she began classes in May last year.

Joyful at work in the SSC kitchen

There has been no looking back for Joyful since she was given the opportunity to learn all the relevant cooking skills under the expert tutelage of the Singita School of Cooking staff. All areas of professional cooking are explored in the school and students learn by doing. The aspirant chefs prepare food for the staff at Singita in a dedicated kitchen and are given opportunities to learn from the highly trained and skilled chefs who produce the Relais & Châteaux-standard food on a daily basis.

Joyful at work in the Singita kitchen

Joyful continues her education at the SSC where she receives many compliments both from her enthusiastic teachers and those with whom she works in the school kitchen. She is reported to have a healthy competitive attitude and a particular flair for culinary language, with her newly-acquired French vocabulary featuring regularly in her menus. She is already an asset to the Singita family and is on track to become a great chef, probably working in our very own kitchens one day. The Singita School of Cooking would not exist were it not for the generous support of our guests, some of whom have given abundantly to ensure that the futures of Joyful, and many others like her, are indeed golden.

Haute cuisine at Singita Kruger National Park

The Singita School of Cooking is located on site at the staff village that serves Singita Kruger National Park, the home of Singita Lebombo Lodge and Singita Sweni Lodge.  It was established with the aim of encouraging the development of culinary skills amongst local youth from neighbouring communities.  Each year, 8 to 10 students are selected – based upon clear criteria including showing a real interest in cooking – to participate in an 18 month long training programme. You can also find out more about the Singita School of Cooking here.

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Sweet Tooth: Giraffe Cinnamon Doughnuts

February 08, 2013 - Cuisine,Experience,Lodges and Camps,Sabi Sand,Singita Ebony Lodge

Giraffe cinnamon doughnuts

Late afternoon at Singita Ebony Lodge

There is something magical about the experience of taking what would otherwise be a formal event, such as afternoon tea, and giving it a fresh twist with an African-inspired menu and a unique setting. Tea at Singita Ebony Lodge is a very special occasion, not least of all because it is often served on the vast wooden deck overlooking the Sand River, where it’s not uncommon to see elephant, buffalo and antelope grazing only metres away. The lodge itself has the feeling of a congenial family home, filled with sumptuous coziness that tempts you into relaxation and reflection.

Every day our unique team of pastry chefs lay on a delectable spread of the finest hand-crafted cakes, sandwiches, tarts and scones, along with homemade lemonade and iced coffee. These sweet and savoury snacks are also served with a selection of exotic teas from all over the world, including Japanese TWG Emperor Sencha, Moroccan mint leaf, Bourbon vanilla black and French Earl Grey. One of Singita Ebony Lodge’s signature teatime treats is “giraffe” cinnamon doughnuts, the recipe for which chef Christien has kindly shared below.

Ingredients – what you’ll need:
2 cups cake flour
1 packet dried yeast
1/8 cup sugar
1 egg
70g butter
pinch of salt
¾ cup warm milk
cinnamon sugar, for dusting

Method – what to do:
Place all of the ingredients (except the cinnamon sugar) in a freestanding mixer with a paddle attachment. On a medium speed, allow the machine to work the mixture until the dough forms a ball around the paddle and starts to slap the sides of the bowl.
Wrap the bowl and leave to rise until double in size.
Sprinkle your work surface with some flour and scrape the dough out. Fold the dough in half and press down lightly, then fold again.
Roll the dough out to a thickness of 0.8cm and cut into desired shapes.
Fry them in small batches in hot oil (170°C) until golden brown on both sides.
Place on paper towel to cool down.
Once cool to touch, roll the doughnuts in cinnamon sugar and serve.

Have you tried any of Christien’s other recipes? Please let us know if you have and send us your photos – we would love to see! Here’s a handy online volume converter if you need to adjust the metric measurements.

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