Category Archives: Environment

Scouting for Art

October 18, 2010 - Environment,Events

Recently on a scouting trip around Nduna searching for lions for our guest, as we headed off road something caught my eye on one of the rock faces.  I decided to go and investigate and found a small rock painting. Due to time restraints I was not able to scout the area for more paintings, nevertheless, I had a quick look around and found a second site about 300 metres from the initial site.  In order to ascertain if these were unique sites I made certain to GPS both of them, made a recording and checked the data.  They were not recorded in our data so I contacted Ben Smith at University of Witwatersrand and they did not have them recorded either.

This was amazing news meaning that we have increased the database of rock paintings now to 80 sites.   These figures refer to painting sites only.  So from the beginning of last year we had a record 56 rock painting sites; the guiding department has increased this record to date to 78 and now these 2 new ones total the sites to 80.  There is no doubt that we will keep adding to this number – we’ll keep you updated.

Singita Guide – Brad Fouche, Singita Pamushana, Zimbabwe

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Have you lost your heart to a baobab lately?

June 30, 2010 - Environment,Singita Pamushana Lodge

The Shangaan believe that the baobab holds immense power. In fact it is a widely held Shangaan belief that when a person sits beneath a baobab tree it steals a piece of that person’s heart. This piece is only returned when they once again sit beneath that same baobab tree.

The baobab is the quintessential African tree and the Malilangwe Reserve is full of these beautiful giants.

Singita Pamushana Lodge and the Baobab.

The direct translation of the word baobab is tree of life, which is apt considering that every part of it can be used.

1. The white pulp, from the fruit of the baobab, is mixed with water and used as a treatment for fever, colds and flu.
2. The seeds, from the baobab fruit, are refreshing to suck on and – when roasted – they make an excellent coffee style        hot beverage.
3. Over the years hollow baobab trunks have served as houses, prisons, storage barns and places of refuge from                    animals.
4. The leaves can be boiled and eaten just like spinach.
5. The bark makes excellent ropes and floor mats. It is also believed to have the power to help an individual secure               respect, prestige and security in their job.

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    The Mopani – a butterfly by any other name is still just as beautiful …

    June 28, 2010 - Environment,Singita Pamushana Lodge

    The Mopani tree bears this beautiful name thanks to its butterfly shaped leaves. Mopani means butterfly.

    The amazing Mopani tree has more to it than just butterfly shaped leaves … it is also highly intelligent in design. It stores tannins, which lie dormant in its root and bark until an animal tries to eat the leaves.  When an animal takes a nibble it releases the tannin making the leaves inedible to most creatures.

    The Mopani Tree.

    photo CC attribution: artbandito on Flickr

    The Mopani tree may be intelligent in design but it is also an elephant’s favourite snack. To get past the tannin issue the elephant doesn’t bother with nibbling off the tree instead it tears a whole Mopani branch from the tree. So, while the rest of the Mopani is rendered inedible thanks to the tannin, the elephant’s branch tastes delicious!

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    A Brief History of Conservation Efforts in Singita Grumeti Reserves

    May 07, 2010 - Africa,Environment,Singita Grumeti,Sustainable Conservation

    Just under 10 years ago Singita Grumeti Reserves was a gorgeous landscape but it was completely devoid of game. Illegal poaching and uncontrolled legal hunting had resulted in the collapse of the wildlife population.

    Singita Grumeti Reserves - a vast landscape.

    The goal with establishing the Singita Grumeti Fund was to generate profit for use in two areas: wildlife conservation and community development.

    From the onset of this initiative everyone involved understood that any wildlife conversation efforts would not succeed without the support of the surrounding communities. To be in a position to be able to provide this support the community required education and development; in other words Singita Grumeti Reserves needed to give the community an understanding of conservation and help the community to create a sustainable alternative to the hunting/poaching of game.

    From the day the Singita Grumeti Fund was established and into the foreseeable future all profits, including profit generated through tourism, have been and will be used solely to support the Fund. This means that every guest who stays at Singita Sasakwa Lodge, Singita Faru Faru Lodge or Singita Sabora Tented Camp supports the Fund initiatives.

    A lioness - Singita Grumeti Reserves.

    In just under a decade the Fund team, Singita Grumeti Reserve guests and others have – through their hard work, dedication and donations – helped restore the vast majority of Singita Grumeti Reserves resident wildlife population. Through additional and extensive education efforts and the creation of alternative employment opportunities – for those residing around the Serengeti ecosystem – the groundwork for sustainable conservation, in Singita Grumeti Reserves (and beyond), has been laid.

    If you’ve stayed as a guest at Singita Grumeti Reserves, you can be proud of what your stay has helped us achieve.

    For more information about the various Singita Grumeti Fund initiatives please email

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    Singita and its Environment

    April 26, 2010 - Environment

    Singita is dedicated to the preservation and conservation of the African wilderness.

    Aerial Photo of the Grumeti River

    We believe that our untouched and expansive surrounding and the exceptional selection of wildlife – found in Singita Sabi Sand, Singita Kruger National Park, Singita Grumeti Reserves and the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve (home to Singita Pamushana Lodge) – are among our greatest assets.

    We go to great lengths to ensure that the experiences we create, to showcase our beautiful reserves, are sustainable and don’t place undue pressure on the surroundings.

    At Singita we live by our mantra and therefore we aim to only touch the earth lightly. This approach ensures that we don’t impose ourselves on nature, we don’t stand above it and we certainly don’t stand apart from it. Instead we immerse ourselves, and our guests, in the awe-inspiring environments surrounding the various Singita lodges and camps.

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