Category Archives: Did You Know?

Robin Hood of Ravenscourt

August 19, 2014 - Did You Know?,Sabi Sand,Singita Boulders Lodge,Singita Castleton,Singita Ebony Lodge

Close to the Western boundary of the Singita Sabi Sand private game reserve is Harry’s Pan, a shallow, glassy lake fringed with reeds. It is on a portion of land purchased from the Lewis family in 1992 and features an unusual landmark – a rusting old car atop a termite hill overlooking the lake. Former Singita Field Guide James Crookes recounts the story:

Robin Hood of Ravenscourt | Singita Sabi Sand

The pan was originally named Pam Pam Dam, after Mrs Lewis’ old English Sheepdog, who regularly played in the water of the dam. After Pam Pam died, Mrs Lewis bought a Rhodesian Ridgeback cross Boxer and named him Robin Hood, or Rob for short.

Robin Hood of Ravenscourt | Singita Sabi Sand

When driving past the pan, one immediately notices the old DKW Auto Union jeep that is perched on top of a termite mound beneath a weeping boer bean tree. Harry Gorman, once the caretaker of the Lewis’ portion of the Ravenscourt property, tells us how Rob had a particular affinity for the vehicle: “He claimed the back seat of the DKW for himself and acted as if he owned the jeep; growling, snarling and even biting anyone that tried to push it. Mrs Lewis had to control Rob if strangers tried to get into the jeep and if ever the engine was started, no matter where he was, Rob would come running and join in the ride.”

Robin Hood of Ravenscourt | Singita Sabi Sand

Two days after the Lewis’ left for a holiday in France in October 1975, Rob died at an animal hospital in Johannesburg, where he was being treated for cancer. Mr Lewis phoned Harry Gorman and instructed him to go to Johannesburg and collect Rob’s body, together with his cushions, mattress and blankets. Harry was also to collect the box of leftover medicine, chains and Rob’s leash, made of Kangaroo skin with a silver clip and handle. All of this was to be buried together with the dog at Pam Pam Dam underneath the DKW Auto Union jeep, which was still in perfect working order at the time.

Robin Hood of Ravenscourt | Singita Sabi Sand

When Mrs Lewis next visited Ravenscourt Ranch, she fitted a small brass plaque to the weeping boer bean tree, which read: “Robin Hood of Ravenscourt, our beloved ‘Rob’, March 1964 – October 1975”. This plaque can still be seen today on the tree alongside the jeep.

Robin Hood of Ravenscourt | Singita Sabi Sand

Pam Pam dam has since become known as Harry’s Pan, largely due to the involvement of Harry Gorman in the story of this section of the Ravenscourt property, as well as the proximity of this pan to his home.

Ravenscourt Ranch is the original name of a plot of land purchased by the Bailes family which now forms part of Singita Sabi Sand, a privately owned game reserve adjacent to the Kruger National Park in South Africa.

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Globetrotter Guide Interview with Singita COO Mark Witney

August 14, 2014 - Did You Know?,Experience,Lodges and Camps

Mark Witney, COO at Singita

Singita COO Mark Witney has always loved the wilderness in all its forms. His great thirst for adventure has led him from flying light aircraft across the Atlantic to scuba diving in Mexico and tracking wild animals through the African bush. In 1994, he helped to open Singita Ebony Lodge, the first Singita property, and ran it for many years before moving into his head office role. With over 20 years of history with the company, he is uniquely qualified to explain what makes Singita unique and, in this excerpt from an interview with ShopLatitude’s Wanderlust blog, he does just that:

Singita Grumeti, Tanzania

Q: Describe Singita and its mission.
A: Singita’s mission is to secure and protect pristine wilderness in Africa for future generations. We achieve this by creating a balance between sustainable tourism operations, a complete commitment to conservation and sound community projects. When we find opportunities to create conservation projects our basic goal is to restore or maintain the land in as near as possible to its original state of biodiversity before the interference of man.

Singita Pamushana Lodge, Zimbabwe

Q: Which location is your favourite Singita Lodge and why?
A: That is a very difficult question. Each of our locations is so different and each has its own unique features, species and landscapes. I love the wide open spaces and abundant herds of Singita Serengeti, the wildness of our Kruger Park property with its unspoiled landscape and large lion prides, the leopard and cheetah sightings at Singita Sabi Sand are unrivalled and Singita Pamushana is one of the most bio-diverse areas under conservation, rich with species that we do not see on any of our other properties.

Singita Serengeti House, Tanzania

Q: What are the three things you never leave home without?
A: My Zeiss binoculars, a supply of strong painkillers (for that unexpected injury in the middle of nowhere) and a good guide book of the birds, mammals and trees of the destination.

Singita Faru Faru Lodge, Tanzania

The Globetrotter column on the Wanderlust blog profiles stylish jet-setters and well-known world-travellers. Mark has also recently been featured in a piece on Jacanda Travel, where he elaborates on what makes the Singita experience so special.

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Creatures Great & Small: The Flap-Necked Chameleon

May 30, 2014 - Did You Know?,Singita Grumeti,Wildlife

Chameleons really are funny little creatures! Did you know that, besides being masterful at camouflage and having tongues roughly 1½ times their body length, chameleons can rotate each eye in a different direction and go through life without the benefit of ears? There are 156 different species concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa and many of them can be found at Singita’s lodges and camps throughout the region.

Flap-necked chameleon at Singita Grumeti

In this gorgeous photo, Singita Grumeti Guide Manager, Ryan Schmitt, carries this female flap-necked chameleon from the middle of the road to the safety of the grass. This particular reptile is a real crowd pleaser with guests and staff alike, and can often be found stalking their favourite snacks of grasshoppers and butterflies.

See more of the unique and fascinating wildlife to be found at Singita by reading our monthly field reports, written by the guides themselves.

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Meet the Lebombo Euphorbia

May 06, 2014 - Did You Know?,Environment,Kruger National Park

Lebombo euphorbias growing along a ridge at Singita Kruger National Park

Singita is very fortunate to share its concession in the Kruger National Park with an astonishing variety of unique and interesting flora. The 33,000 acres of land in the southeastern reaches of the park lie between the red rhyolite-based Lebombo Mountains in the east and the flat grasslands with their extremely fertile basaltic soils in the west. This creates a beautiful and varied landscape filled with rich, verdant plant life.

Lebombo euphorbias growing along a ridge at Singita Kruger National Park

Flora, like fauna, has its own preferences in terms of habitat, and the differences in soil type and topography allow for a wonderful and flourishing spectrum to exist. One such example of this unique vegetation is the Lebombo euphorbia (Euphorbia confinalis), a cactus-like tree with a single trunk and a canopy of upward-growing branches. It is only found in the Lebombo mountain region, and, along with its cousin, the Transvaal candelabra euphorbia, is an incredibly picturesque and exotic part of the local landscape.

Transvaal candelabra euphorbias growing in the boma at Singita Lebombo Lodge

They are very drought resistant and are particularly beautiful from June to August, when they grow small, light-yellow flowers in groups of three along the spine of each cucumber-shaped lobe.

Transvaal candelabra euphorbias dot the ridge along which Singita Lebombo Lodge is situated

Trees of the euphorbia family are filled with a white, milky latex and are extremely toxic. As a result, the tree is not eaten by many animals. Despite this, the traditional uses are quite varied – they include using it to stun fish (making them easier to catch), for treating lesions and wounds on cattle, and as an effective poison for hunting arrows.

Find out more about the local flora of Singita Kruger National Park, as well as interesting game spotting and animal stores by catching up on the latest Wildlife Reports from the region.

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Touching the Earth Lightly: Celebrating Earth Day 2014

April 22, 2014 - Conservation,Conservation,Did You Know?,Environment,Experience,Lamai,Lodges and Camps,Singita Mara River Tented Camp

Singita celebrates Earth Day

Earth Day is honoured every year on April 22, in a worldwide show of support for environmental protection. It was first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network, and celebrated in more than 192 countries each year. Singita’s lodges and camps are committed to “touching the earth lightly”, and this is manifested in the way the lodges are constructed; how they operate today; and how guests experience the wildlife and the natural habitat around them.

Singita celebrates Earth Day

Singita Mara River Tented Camp is the epitome of sustainable tourism and consciously seeks to eliminate the unnecessary use of energy. In keeping with this philosophy, the camp operates “off-the-grid” and relies on a custom designed solar power system, with an inverter battery bank that ensures an uninterrupted power source at night or on rainy days. The photo voltaic solar panels used to harvest energy from the sun supply electricity to the camp’s energy-saving LEDs lights, pool pump, and washing machines, among other things.

Singita celebrates Earth Day

The camp’s potable water comes from a borehole near the site and is, in turn, heated by solar geysers. Although this water is drinkable, Singita is also planning an additional filtering system which will be in place before the end of the year, eliminating the need to use any plastic bottled water at this location.

Singita celebrates Earth Day

The camp has been purpose-built to be environmentally conscious, and as a result has a clean and efficient recycling programme that is leading the way for the rest of Singita’s lodges. Waste management is extremely important to this process. For example, fresh produce is transported and wrapped using traditional methods, such as recycled wooden boxes and wood chips or sawdust for packing. These boxes are then returned to the local supplier for the following week so that no plastic or modern packaging is used, eliminating unnecessary waste going into the country’s landfills.

Singita celebrates Earth Day

To limit the construction footprint, Singita Mara River Tented Camp makes use of a series of open-air decks instead of separate buildings for the gym and spa. Energetic guests have access to yoga mats, kettle bells and jump ropes, while the spa offers treatments on the decks or in the tents, without using any electrical equipment. Toiletries used in the lodge are also all organic.

Singita celebrates Earth Day

Singita’s achievements with the efficient and environmentally-friendly construction and operations of Singita Mara River Tented Camp are significant in light of our planet’s ongoing struggle to maintain balance and fight climate change. The wonderful “lightness” of this property will serve as a template for all future lodge designs, setting a benchmark for responsible but luxurious travel.

Singita celebrates Earth Day

Conservation lives hand-in-hand with ecotourism and community development at Singita. We believe it’s the responsible way to maintain and extend the sustainability of our wildlife reserves. Read more about our conservation efforts on our website.

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Beekeeping for Biodiversity

April 04, 2014 - Community Development,Conservation,Did You Know?,Singita Grumeti,The Grumeti Fund,Wildlife

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

Singita Grumeti

There has been much written about the plight of bees on a global scale, and the disastrous impact their dwindling populations could have on commercial agriculture and food production. Looking closer to home, the conservation of bees in particular is critical to the survival of local plant life; a crucial element of sustainable environmental conservation and biodiversity enrichment.

At Singita Grumeti in Tanzania, through the Grumeti Fund and the local outreach programme, beekeeping projects have been promoted in local communities since 2010, who in turn earn an income from the sale of honey. This way, the community is supported while the bees’ natural habitat is preserved, and serves as a great example of how conservation and community development are integrally connected.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

To date, seven beekeeping groups and various individuals and families have become involved in the project, and are now responsible for 744 beehives. Among the most successful groups is the Bonchugu Community, under the thoughtful leadership of Amos Matiku. He is described as an energetic, enthusiastic and a results-oriented person who never gives up.

“I first heard about the beekeeping project from a Community Outreach officer in 2011 and although skeptical at first, eventually myself and nine others in the community applied to join the project,” Amos says.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

It started with 20 hives, and members had to contribute 33% of the cost of running each hive, with the Grumeti Fund providing all necessary support needed for the project. In a very short time, the hives were stocked with bees and the members were able to see the fruits of their labour. In June 2012, the group celebrated their first harvest, and just 2 days laters were able to sell all the honey. The income generated covered the initial contribution of each member and they decided as a group to reinvest the profits in order to grow the project.

33 more hives were added, and in 2013, their harvest was the most successful in the whole Serengeti, which afforded them to opportunity to attend an international exhibition in Dar es Salaam. Their organic acacia honey was the show’s bestseller and allowed them to raise additional funds for the project. The group was also invited to attend another regional exhibition and are deservedly proud of their achievements so far.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

The Grumeti Fund also facilitates training for the group, helping them to stay abreast of the latest in beekeeping technology. Amos says: “Through this programme, we have realised the impact conservation can have on all our lives. The acacia forests which were previously degraded are now flourishing with new growth. Beekeeping has created employment and income for local families, while helping to conserve our land and its wildlife.”

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

The keeping of beehives helps to maintain riparian zones, natural springs, and remnant forest and bush areas as these are the the optimal habitat for the bees. The presence of the hives also prevents timber and firewood harvesting in those areas, and discourages elephants (they don’t like bees!) from trampling the nearby farmland and destroying the crops.

In 2002, the Grumeti Community and Wildlife Conservation Fund, a not-for-profit organisation, was granted the right to manage and conserve 350,000 acres, for the benefit of Tanzania, Africa and the world. Four years later, Singita took over the management of the property, at the request of the concessionaire and began the task of generating, via low impact tourism, the funds necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of the reserve through conservation and community partnerships.

 If you would like more information, please contact Pam Richardson, Singita’s Group HR and Community Development Manager.

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The Perfect Family Safari with Singita

January 08, 2014 - Accommodation,Did You Know?,Experience,Safari

The untamed wilderness and magnificent wildlife of Africa is a truly life changing experience no matter one’s age. A safari makes for an unforgettable family holiday, with exhilarating activities for the entire family to enjoy, memories made together that will last a lifetime, and opportunities to learn and grow together. As the new year begins and you start to plan vacations to take in 2014, you may find that a safari is the ultimate family adventure.

Family Safari at Singita

Historically, a safari was considered to be a trip of a lifetime or a holiday reserved for older people – the baby boomer generation – and child-free travellers. Modern safari-goers now include dual-income younger parents who want to spend their hard-earned vacations with their children, rather than choosing luxury resorts with kids clubs attached. A family safari is a great shared adventure with the potential to strengthen family bonds and create lifelong memories. For some families, it’s also a chance to unplug from the digital world and be immersed in nature for a while. Whether learning how to track and identifying animals or how to spot the Southern Cross in the night sky, going on safari is a unique experience far removed from the demands and distractions of urban life. In the bush, routine and rules are dictated by the realities of sharing space with wild animals and the necessary precautions attached to this. Children’s eyes are opened to a completely different world filled with experiences they could never have at home.

Family Safari at Singita

A shared morning game drive may include a stop to learn more about tracking followed later by a relaxed bush breakfast to allow everyone to stretch their legs. Afterwards, the energetic can walk back to camp with the guide while the tracker drives the rest of the party back to the lodge. Game drives and mealtimes offer plenty of scope for togetherness, but there’s also time to be independent and retreat into the luxury and solitude of your suite.

Family Safari at Singita

Multi-generational parties wanting additional privacy and flexibility are booking Singita’s exclusive-use lodges or camps, such as Singita Castleton (South Africa), Singita Serengeti House (Tanzania), and Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camps (Tanzania), set up in prime locations in the Grumeti reserve. For parents travelling with their children, there are special two-bedroomed family suites at Singita Boulders and Ebony Lodges (South Africa) and Singita Faru Faru Lodge (Tanzania). With bigger families or teens, the villa accommodation at Singita Sasakwa Lodge (Tanzania) and Singita Pamushana Lodge (Zimbabwe) is ideal.

Family Safari at Singita

Singita’s approach to family safaris is to steer clear of set, cookie-cutter programs. Instead, fluid itineraries are planned around each family for the duration of their stay, taking into consideration the age of the children and any special interests or requests. “Our guests are well travelled and their children are accustomed to privilege and opportunity wherever they go,” says Mark Broodryk, Singita Sabi Sand’s head guide. “We try shift the focus away from physical ‘stuff’ and highlight the intangible aspects of being here, such as learning a new skill or notching up an exciting experience that will earn them bragging rights with their friends. It’s not about what you have when you are in the bush, but what you know to ensure your survival.”

Family Safari at Singita

Children are welcomed with an age-appropriate survival kit that includes a water bottle and sunscreen – essential items that come with a mother’s stamp of approval rather than an expensive price tag. They are also given a small satchel with Velcro tabs to which they are encouraged to attach badges earned for skills in tracking, fishing, birding, astronomy, botany, survival in the bush and many other activities. These badges are linked to the popular Singita Mini Rangers’ Course (South Africa and Zimbabwe) or Watoto Pori Singita Training Course (Tanzania), which can be extended or edited to suit the length of a family’s stay. These courses cover tracking animals; frogging; butterfly capture and release; astronomy; bush survival techniques; flower-pressing; game-spotting competitions; nature quizzes and a guide’s test. Teens are challenged in different ways, for example getting their hands dirty by helping to plant trees at community schools. Learning basic survival skills, like how to make a fire, find a water source or identify edible plants with medicinal uses, holds universal appeal regardless of age.

Family Safari at Singita

Every aspect of a Singita family safari is individualised, from the most suitable accommodation to meal times and what’s on the menu. It’s a philosophy based on welcoming families, rather than tolerating them. All the lodges have swimming pools, while most also offer tennis, archery and fishing. At Singita Grumeti, capable riders can experience the thrill of a horseback safari. Families who show an interest in community initiatives and education often enjoy visiting local communities, especially the schools. This is another opportunity for parents to expose their children to the realities of life beyond their own privileged existence, while planting seeds of awareness and understanding about other cultures.

Family Safari at Singita

Eating well is central to a memorable safari, especially when taking children into consideration. Thoughtfully put-together snack boxes accompany children on every game drive, providing both diversion and sustenance. In the evening, while parents enjoy an elegant multi-course menu paired to wines from Singita’s extensive cellar, children may request their own mini tasting menu where the emphasis is on fun plating and their favourite flavours. Families also enjoy Singita’s ‘family feast’ style of dining where communal platters of food – roast chicken and a variety of fresh salads, for example – are brought to the table at the same time so that hungry children can eat quickly while the rest of the family settles into a relaxed, sociable meal. The chefs at each lodge are well versed at adapting menus to suit children or meeting special requests for homemade burgers or rolling out dough to bake their own pizzas.

Family Safari at Singita

There are numerous benefits to taking children on safari, not least the unique learning opportunities. In turn, Singita values the opportunity to engage with young people and teach these future decision makers and custodians of the planet about the significance and interconnection of conservation, communities and the low-impact, high-yield model of ecotourism that has proved to be successful in Africa.

Family Safari at Singita

To find out more about family safaris at Singita, please complete our enquiry form and one of our reservations consultants will make contact to assist you with availability and help you to plan your trip.

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Wildlife Census 2013 in Tanzania

December 27, 2013 - Conservation,Conservation,Did You Know?,Environment,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Conservation has always been pivotal to Singita’s existence, as it lives hand-in-hand with Singita’s other two operating principles; ecotourism and community development. We believe it’s the responsible way to maintain and extend the sustainability of the reserves under our care. As we reflect on the successes of the past year, it seems fitting to report on the positive findings of a recent census that took place at Singita Grumeti earlier in 2013.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

The hands-on conservation teams on each property are committed to protecting, maintaining and enhancing the land and its fauna and flora. For example, Singita Grumeti has as one of its goals the rehabilitation of the wildlife populations of Grumeti and Ikorongo Game Reserves and associated wildlife management areas in the Serengeti, Tanzania. Over the last eight years, Singita Grumeti has made a significant investment into the protection of wildlife in the area as well as the infrastructure required to support ecotourism. The effectiveness of these inputs and the management activities that result need to be monitored for appropriate outcomes, the most logical of which is the change in status of the resident herbivores.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Having an understanding of the number of animals, their distribution and numerical trends forms one of the most basic sets of information necessary for the informed management of a wildlife operation. A starting point is a regular and accurate assessment of population size of possibly all, but certainly the ecologically and economically most important species.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

A census was therefore undertaken by way of an aerial survey between the 23rd of August and the 3rd of September 2013 in the Ikorongo-Grumeti Reserves complex. This survey was the tenth undertaken over a period of 11 years, under particularly favourable counting conditions and with a very experienced team of enumerators.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

At the initiation of this project, the Grumeti Fund management team’s primary purpose was to facilitate the recovery of the resident large herbivore populations in this part of the Serengeti ecosystem. This was seen as an important step in the rehabilitation of this particular region, protecting the migratory herds but also helping to fully restore the tourism potential of the area.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Notable statistics from the census include the slowing population increase of buffalo (although this species has shown a six fold increase in estimated size over the last 10 years) and this year showing the highest number of elephant in the area since inception. The population estimate for elephant has varied substantially over the last eight years, probably as a result of the animals moving in and out in response to resource availability. Overall, the population showing a gradual increase of 5% per annum over the last 10 years. In addition, the topi, a local migrant antelope, would appear to have stabilised at around 15 000 animals. Fluctuations are likely due both to forage conditions as well as predation.

census_7

Click the image below to see the full-size infographic depicting population growth until 2011:

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Singita Grumeti also has a highly successful Anti-Poaching Unit comprising 120 game scouts (most of the ex-poachers) who work together with the Wildlife Division to eradicated illegal hunting within the concession. Visit our Conservation page to learn more about how Singita manages the half a million acres of pristine African wilderness that it is proud guardian of.

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Shopping at Singita

December 09, 2013 - Did You Know?,Experience,Kruger National Park,Sabi Sand

Singita Boutique & Gallery

High-end design and an effortlessly chic safari aesthetic are trademarks of the Singita experience, and something that is carried through in all of our properties, whether classic or contemporary. Over the years, the introduction of boutiques and galleries at the lodges has allowed guests the opportunity to take home a memento that not only reminds them of their safari adventure with us, but adds a unique and stylish touch of Africa to their homes.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Guests of Singita are often surprised to discover the retail experience in camp. Shopping on safari becomes a relaxed excursion to enjoy between game drives without any time restraints or pressure to purchase. The original boutique and gallery is at Singita Sabi Sand, and is located in an inviting African colonial farmhouse. The verandah is a delightful place to pause and enjoy a refreshing drink or cappuccino before exploring the treasures in the homestead’s interleading rooms, adjoining courtyard and wine boutique. Many of the items, from decor accessories to clothing, are unique to Singita. Wildlife photographic prints, candelabra, unusual jewellery and Singita’s signature wire underplates are all popular purchases with guests.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Kruger National Park offers a similarly indulgent shopping experience, but in a thoroughly contemporary setting in keeping with the chic design of the Lebombo and Sweni lodges. Not all of the properties have fully fledged boutiques; at the smaller or more remote lodges pared-down retail collections are displayed in eye-catching metal and glass cabinets.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Kim Peter, general manager and buyer for all of Singita’s boutiques and galleries, takes into account each lodge’s location and unique style. She also gauges guest feedback, along with the luxury traveller’s desire for rare or precious artefacts reminiscent of Africa or unique to a particular destination or culture.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita often collaborates with local crafters in a specific region who create sought-after handmade items. In South Africa, Singita’s designers work with a Zulu wire weaving group in KwaZulu-Natal to create the handwoven wire underplates in colour schemes that are unique to each lodge. Kim also sources items throughout Africa to reflect the integrity and beauty of the continent’s myriad cultures and traditions, including rare bronze cast figurines from Benin and colourful, carved dolls from the Namji tribe in northern Cameroon.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Georgina Pennington, group style, design and procurement design manager for Singita, confirms that guests usually want to take home a little piece of Africa as a memento of their safari. Sometimes, a guest even falls in love with a piece of furniture in the lodge. Where possible, the procurement team will source the exact item or find something similar for that guest. Long after guests have returned home, there is an unwritten, open invitation from Singita to assist them with any future purchases no matter how big or small.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Boutique & Gallery

You can read more about our collaboration with the Zulu women who weave our wire underplates, and our other community development projects in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. 

 

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Field Guide Favourites: River Crossing

October 25, 2013 - Africa,Did You Know?,Experience,Sabi Sand,Wildlife

You would be forgiven for assuming that lions, the larger and more ferocious cousins of our domestic cats, weren’t big fans of the water. In actual fact, lions are excellent swimmers and although they aren’t prone to daily dips (unlike tigers who use the water to cool down) they will cross a body of water with ease.

Marlon du Toit, a Field Guide at Singita Sabi Sand is an excellent wildlife photographer whose pictures can regularly be seen on this blog, our Facebook page and across various international websites and publications. He was lucky enough to get this incredible photograph of not only two adult lionesses traversing the Sand River, but with six little lion cubs in tow! As Marlon says, “This is a lifetime of waiting and hoping all in one shot… something very special indeed.”

River Crossing by Marlon du Toit | Singita

Our “Field Guide Favourites” is an ongoing series of wildlife photographs from our team in the bush. See more of Marlon’s photographs in previous posts or visit his website for more.

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