Category Archives: Did You Know?

Beekeeping for Biodiversity

April 04, 2014 - Community Development,Conservation,Did You Know?,Singita Grumeti,The Grumeti Fund,Wildlife

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

There has been much written about the plight of bees on a global scale, and the disastrous impact their dwindling populations could have on commercial agriculture and food production. Looking closer to home, the conservation of bees in particular is critical to the survival of local plant life; a crucial element of sustainable environmental conservation and biodiversity enrichment.

At Singita Grumeti in Tanzania, through the Grumeti Fund and the local outreach programme, beekeeping projects have been promoted in local communities since 2010, who in turn earn an income from the sale of honey. This way, the community is supported while the bees’ natural habitat is preserved, and serves as a great example of how conservation and community development are integrally connected.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

To date, seven beekeeping groups and various individuals and families have become involved in the project, and are now responsible for 744 beehives. Among the most successful groups is the Bonchugu Community, under the thoughtful leadership of Amos Matiku. He is described as an energetic, enthusiastic and a results-oriented person who never gives up.

“I first heard about the beekeeping project from a Community Outreach officer in 2011 and although skeptical at first, eventually myself and nine others in the community applied to join the project,” Amos says.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

It started with 20 hives, and members had to contribute 33% of the cost of running each hive, with the Grumeti Fund providing all necessary support needed for the project. In a very short time, the hives were stocked with bees and the members were able to see the fruits of their labour. In June 2012, the group celebrated their first harvest, and just 2 days laters were able to sell all the honey. The income generated covered the initial contribution of each member and they decided as a group to reinvest the profits in order to grow the project.

33 more hives were added, and in 2013, their harvest was the most successful in the whole Serengeti, which afforded them to opportunity to attend an international exhibition in Dar es Salaam. Their organic acacia honey was the show’s bestseller and allowed them to raise additional funds for the project. The group was also invited to attend another regional exhibition and are deservedly proud of their achievements so far.

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

The Grumeti Fund also facilitates training for the group, helping them to stay abreast of the latest in beekeeping technology. Amos says: “Through this programme, we have realised the impact conservation can have on all our lives. The acacia forests which were previously degraded are now flourishing with new growth. Beekeeping has created employment and income for local families, while helping to conserve our land and its wildlife.”

Beekeeping in Tanzania | Singita Grumeti Fund

The keeping of beehives helps to maintain riparian zones, natural springs, and remnant forest and bush areas as these are the the optimal habitat for the bees. The presence of the hives also prevents timber and firewood harvesting in those areas, and discourages elephants (they don’t like bees!) from trampling the nearby farmland and destroying the crops.

In 2002, the Grumeti Community and Wildlife Conservation Fund, a not-for-profit organisation, was granted the right to manage and conserve 350,000 acres, for the benefit of Tanzania, Africa and the world. Four years later, Singita took over the management of the property, at the request of the concessionaire and began the task of generating, via low impact tourism, the funds necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of the reserve through conservation and community partnerships.

 If you would like more information, please contact Pam Richardson, Singita’s Group HR and Community Development Manager.

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The Perfect Family Safari with Singita

January 08, 2014 - Accommodation,Did You Know?,Experience,Safari

The untamed wilderness and magnificent wildlife of Africa is a truly life changing experience no matter one’s age. A safari makes for an unforgettable family holiday, with exhilarating activities for the entire family to enjoy, memories made together that will last a lifetime, and opportunities to learn and grow together. As the new year begins and you start to plan vacations to take in 2014, you may find that a safari is the ultimate family adventure.

Family Safari at Singita

Historically, a safari was considered to be a trip of a lifetime or a holiday reserved for older people – the baby boomer generation – and child-free travellers. Modern safari-goers now include dual-income younger parents who want to spend their hard-earned vacations with their children, rather than choosing luxury resorts with kids clubs attached. A family safari is a great shared adventure with the potential to strengthen family bonds and create lifelong memories. For some families, it’s also a chance to unplug from the digital world and be immersed in nature for a while. Whether learning how to track and identifying animals or how to spot the Southern Cross in the night sky, going on safari is a unique experience far removed from the demands and distractions of urban life. In the bush, routine and rules are dictated by the realities of sharing space with wild animals and the necessary precautions attached to this. Children’s eyes are opened to a completely different world filled with experiences they could never have at home.

Family Safari at Singita

A shared morning game drive may include a stop to learn more about tracking followed later by a relaxed bush breakfast to allow everyone to stretch their legs. Afterwards, the energetic can walk back to camp with the guide while the tracker drives the rest of the party back to the lodge. Game drives and mealtimes offer plenty of scope for togetherness, but there’s also time to be independent and retreat into the luxury and solitude of your suite.

Family Safari at Singita

Multi-generational parties wanting additional privacy and flexibility are booking Singita’s exclusive-use lodges or camps, such as Singita Castleton (South Africa), Singita Serengeti House (Tanzania), and Singita Explore Mobile Tented Camps (Tanzania), set up in prime locations in the Grumeti reserve. For parents travelling with their children, there are special two-bedroomed family suites at Singita Boulders and Ebony Lodges (South Africa) and Singita Faru Faru Lodge (Tanzania). With bigger families or teens, the villa accommodation at Singita Sasakwa Lodge (Tanzania) and Singita Pamushana Lodge (Zimbabwe) is ideal.

Family Safari at Singita

Singita’s approach to family safaris is to steer clear of set, cookie-cutter programs. Instead, fluid itineraries are planned around each family for the duration of their stay, taking into consideration the age of the children and any special interests or requests. “Our guests are well travelled and their children are accustomed to privilege and opportunity wherever they go,” says Mark Broodryk, Singita Sabi Sand’s head guide. “We try shift the focus away from physical ‘stuff’ and highlight the intangible aspects of being here, such as learning a new skill or notching up an exciting experience that will earn them bragging rights with their friends. It’s not about what you have when you are in the bush, but what you know to ensure your survival.”

Family Safari at Singita

Children are welcomed with an age-appropriate survival kit that includes a water bottle and sunscreen – essential items that come with a mother’s stamp of approval rather than an expensive price tag. They are also given a small satchel with Velcro tabs to which they are encouraged to attach badges earned for skills in tracking, fishing, birding, astronomy, botany, survival in the bush and many other activities. These badges are linked to the popular Singita Mini Rangers’ Course (South Africa and Zimbabwe) or Watoto Pori Singita Training Course (Tanzania), which can be extended or edited to suit the length of a family’s stay. These courses cover tracking animals; frogging; butterfly capture and release; astronomy; bush survival techniques; flower-pressing; game-spotting competitions; nature quizzes and a guide’s test. Teens are challenged in different ways, for example getting their hands dirty by helping to plant trees at community schools. Learning basic survival skills, like how to make a fire, find a water source or identify edible plants with medicinal uses, holds universal appeal regardless of age.

Family Safari at Singita

Every aspect of a Singita family safari is individualised, from the most suitable accommodation to meal times and what’s on the menu. It’s a philosophy based on welcoming families, rather than tolerating them. All the lodges have swimming pools, while most also offer tennis, archery and fishing. At Singita Grumeti, capable riders can experience the thrill of a horseback safari. Families who show an interest in community initiatives and education often enjoy visiting local communities, especially the schools. This is another opportunity for parents to expose their children to the realities of life beyond their own privileged existence, while planting seeds of awareness and understanding about other cultures.

Family Safari at Singita

Eating well is central to a memorable safari, especially when taking children into consideration. Thoughtfully put-together snack boxes accompany children on every game drive, providing both diversion and sustenance. In the evening, while parents enjoy an elegant multi-course menu paired to wines from Singita’s extensive cellar, children may request their own mini tasting menu where the emphasis is on fun plating and their favourite flavours. Families also enjoy Singita’s ‘family feast’ style of dining where communal platters of food – roast chicken and a variety of fresh salads, for example – are brought to the table at the same time so that hungry children can eat quickly while the rest of the family settles into a relaxed, sociable meal. The chefs at each lodge are well versed at adapting menus to suit children or meeting special requests for homemade burgers or rolling out dough to bake their own pizzas.

Family Safari at Singita

There are numerous benefits to taking children on safari, not least the unique learning opportunities. In turn, Singita values the opportunity to engage with young people and teach these future decision makers and custodians of the planet about the significance and interconnection of conservation, communities and the low-impact, high-yield model of ecotourism that has proved to be successful in Africa.

Family Safari at Singita

To find out more about family safaris at Singita, please complete our enquiry form and one of our reservations consultants will make contact to assist you with availability and help you to plan your trip.

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Wildlife Census 2013 in Tanzania

December 27, 2013 - Conservation,Conservation,Did You Know?,Environment,Safari,Singita Grumeti,Sustainable Conservation,Wildlife

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Conservation has always been pivotal to Singita’s existence, as it lives hand-in-hand with Singita’s other two operating principles; ecotourism and community development. We believe it’s the responsible way to maintain and extend the sustainability of the reserves under our care. As we reflect on the successes of the past year, it seems fitting to report on the positive findings of a recent census that took place at Singita Grumeti earlier in 2013.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

The hands-on conservation teams on each property are committed to protecting, maintaining and enhancing the land and its fauna and flora. For example, Singita Grumeti has as one of its goals the rehabilitation of the wildlife populations of Grumeti and Ikorongo Game Reserves and associated wildlife management areas in the Serengeti, Tanzania. Over the last eight years, Singita Grumeti has made a significant investment into the protection of wildlife in the area as well as the infrastructure required to support ecotourism. The effectiveness of these inputs and the management activities that result need to be monitored for appropriate outcomes, the most logical of which is the change in status of the resident herbivores.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Having an understanding of the number of animals, their distribution and numerical trends forms one of the most basic sets of information necessary for the informed management of a wildlife operation. A starting point is a regular and accurate assessment of population size of possibly all, but certainly the ecologically and economically most important species.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

A census was therefore undertaken by way of an aerial survey between the 23rd of August and the 3rd of September 2013 in the Ikorongo-Grumeti Reserves complex. This survey was the tenth undertaken over a period of 11 years, under particularly favourable counting conditions and with a very experienced team of enumerators.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

At the initiation of this project, the Grumeti Fund management team’s primary purpose was to facilitate the recovery of the resident large herbivore populations in this part of the Serengeti ecosystem. This was seen as an important step in the rehabilitation of this particular region, protecting the migratory herds but also helping to fully restore the tourism potential of the area.

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Notable statistics from the census include the slowing population increase of buffalo (although this species has shown a six fold increase in estimated size over the last 10 years) and this year showing the highest number of elephant in the area since inception. The population estimate for elephant has varied substantially over the last eight years, probably as a result of the animals moving in and out in response to resource availability. Overall, the population showing a gradual increase of 5% per annum over the last 10 years. In addition, the topi, a local migrant antelope, would appear to have stabilised at around 15 000 animals. Fluctuations are likely due both to forage conditions as well as predation.

census_7

Click the image below to see the full-size infographic depicting population growth until 2011:

Wildlife Census 2013 | Singita

Singita Grumeti also has a highly successful Anti-Poaching Unit comprising 120 game scouts (most of the ex-poachers) who work together with the Wildlife Division to eradicated illegal hunting within the concession. Visit our Conservation page to learn more about how Singita manages the half a million acres of pristine African wilderness that it is proud guardian of.

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Shopping at Singita

December 09, 2013 - Did You Know?,Experience,Kruger National Park,Sabi Sand

Singita Boutique & Gallery

High-end design and an effortlessly chic safari aesthetic are trademarks of the Singita experience, and something that is carried through in all of our properties, whether classic or contemporary. Over the years, the introduction of boutiques and galleries at the lodges has allowed guests the opportunity to take home a memento that not only reminds them of their safari adventure with us, but adds a unique and stylish touch of Africa to their homes.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Guests of Singita are often surprised to discover the retail experience in camp. Shopping on safari becomes a relaxed excursion to enjoy between game drives without any time restraints or pressure to purchase. The original boutique and gallery is at Singita Sabi Sand, and is located in an inviting African colonial farmhouse. The verandah is a delightful place to pause and enjoy a refreshing drink or cappuccino before exploring the treasures in the homestead’s interleading rooms, adjoining courtyard and wine boutique. Many of the items, from decor accessories to clothing, are unique to Singita. Wildlife photographic prints, candelabra, unusual jewellery and Singita’s signature wire underplates are all popular purchases with guests.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Kruger National Park offers a similarly indulgent shopping experience, but in a thoroughly contemporary setting in keeping with the chic design of the Lebombo and Sweni lodges. Not all of the properties have fully fledged boutiques; at the smaller or more remote lodges pared-down retail collections are displayed in eye-catching metal and glass cabinets.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Kim Peter, general manager and buyer for all of Singita’s boutiques and galleries, takes into account each lodge’s location and unique style. She also gauges guest feedback, along with the luxury traveller’s desire for rare or precious artefacts reminiscent of Africa or unique to a particular destination or culture.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita often collaborates with local crafters in a specific region who create sought-after handmade items. In South Africa, Singita’s designers work with a Zulu wire weaving group in KwaZulu-Natal to create the handwoven wire underplates in colour schemes that are unique to each lodge. Kim also sources items throughout Africa to reflect the integrity and beauty of the continent’s myriad cultures and traditions, including rare bronze cast figurines from Benin and colourful, carved dolls from the Namji tribe in northern Cameroon.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Georgina Pennington, group style, design and procurement design manager for Singita, confirms that guests usually want to take home a little piece of Africa as a memento of their safari. Sometimes, a guest even falls in love with a piece of furniture in the lodge. Where possible, the procurement team will source the exact item or find something similar for that guest. Long after guests have returned home, there is an unwritten, open invitation from Singita to assist them with any future purchases no matter how big or small.

Singita Boutique & Gallery

Singita Boutique & Gallery

You can read more about our collaboration with the Zulu women who weave our wire underplates, and our other community development projects in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. 

 

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Field Guide Favourites: River Crossing

October 25, 2013 - Africa,Did You Know?,Experience,Sabi Sand,Wildlife

You would be forgiven for assuming that lions, the larger and more ferocious cousins of our domestic cats, weren’t big fans of the water. In actual fact, lions are excellent swimmers and although they aren’t prone to daily dips (unlike tigers who use the water to cool down) they will cross a body of water with ease.

Marlon du Toit, a Field Guide at Singita Sabi Sand is an excellent wildlife photographer whose pictures can regularly be seen on this blog, our Facebook page and across various international websites and publications. He was lucky enough to get this incredible photograph of not only two adult lionesses traversing the Sand River, but with six little lion cubs in tow! As Marlon says, “This is a lifetime of waiting and hoping all in one shot… something very special indeed.”

River Crossing by Marlon du Toit | Singita

Our “Field Guide Favourites” is an ongoing series of wildlife photographs from our team in the bush. See more of Marlon’s photographs in previous posts or visit his website for more.

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Stocking the Cellar: The Story of Singita’s Wines II

April 08, 2013 - Did You Know?,Experience

Among the many factors involved in creating the best safari experience in Africa is the logistical challenge of sourcing and stocking the extensive wine cellars at each lodge and camp. In this behind-the-scenes story, we share the fascinating details of what it takes to put together a top-end wine list in such remote locations.

Wine at Singita

As you will have read previously, Singita Premier Wine is the department dedicated to sourcing and supplying wines for all the Singita properties. The wine list at each lodge offers an average of 180 different bottles, all of which need to be painstakingly selected, purchased, matured and distributed throughout South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. François Rautenbach is the talented man responsible for this process and has been involved with Singita Premier Wine for over a decade.

To assist in purchasing the best wines, the lodges document consumption patterns of guests, record every wine tasting ever hosted and every wine opened. François also tracks international wine trends and, of course, trusts his own palate and taste when it comes to sourcing new wines.

Wine at Singita

Recognised as one of South Africa’s most influential buyers of wine, Singita has an extensive selection of premium wines, including some of the country’s most sought-after private reserves and limited-release wines. Wines are matured under carefully managed conditions, which is why the lodges can offer the majority of their red wines at five years or older.

The wine cellar at Singita Boulders Lodge

Sourcing wines is an on-going job, and François and his team work directly with the producers, either making personal visits to the farms or tasting samples sent to them. The Nederburg Auction is attended annually with specific emphasis on purchasing rare sweet wines not available elsewhere. At the Cape Winemakers Guild Auction, unique wines with proven rarity and provenance are purchased, often with specific guests in mind.

Food and wine pairing

Singita Ebony Lodge and Singita Boulders Lodge in the Sabi Sand reserve were the first lodges to house an extensive wine cellar and boutique, and the wine culture established there remains the benchmark for Singita lodges throughout Africa.

Singita Sabi Sand has a large walk-in fridge which acts as the storage and distribution hub for the lodges in the Sabi Sand, Kruger National Park and Singita Pamushana Lodge in Zimbabwe. Complementing this is a 60-ton, exclusive-use maturation facility located at Delvera estate in Stellenbosch. Three tons of wine is transported monthly by means of temperature-controlled containers (known as reefers) from Stellenbosch to the refrigerated hub at Singita Sabi Sand. In 2008, a similar bulk fridge was built at Singita Grumeti to function as the East-African hub.

Francois Rautenbach

In order to reduce the company’s carbon footprint, a bulk monthly delivery schedule is in place to move the maximum amount of wine at a time. A 20-foot reefer is loaded with 12 600 bottles of wine in Stellenbosch before departing via Cape Town, Durban and on to Dar es Salaam, where the container is cleared through customs. Once cleared the bottles are packed into two refrigerated trucks and driven to Singita Grumeti – a journey of four to five days – where it is unloaded directly into the walk-in fridge. From there, bottles are progressively distributed to each lodge or camp depending on demand.

For more information or to order wine through Singita Premier Wine Direct (available to current, past and future Singita guests) please contact us at premierwine@singita.com. You can also read more about Singita’s wines on the blog.

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Travel Essentials for a Successful Safari

April 02, 2013 - Africa,Did You Know?,Experience,Safari

Singita

For many of our guests, an African safari is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. The relative isolation of each lodge and camp and the unique daily itineraries, call for certain travel essentials to make the trip as comfortable and memorable as possible. We asked Jason Trollip, Tourism Manager at Singita Grumeti, Singita Serengeti and manager of various Singita lodges for almost a decade now, to tell us what he recommends guests pack for a safari.

Jason has a passion for wildlife and has travelled large parts of Africa himself, visiting wilderness areas and working with local communities on development projects around game reserves. As a result, he has an intimate knowledge of the African bush and experience with all the practical challenges such an unusual location can pose.

Jason Trollip on the plains of the Serengeti

Good quality camera
While the lenses on today’s mobile phones are incredibly good, they are no match for a high quality, digital point-and-shoot or SLR when you’re trying to capture the perfect landscape or wildlife shot.

Small binoculars
Compact, high quality binoculars will greatly enhance your game-spotting ability and offer the best possible close-up of the local wildlife. The best ones are made by companies like Leica, Swarovski and Zeiss, although mid-range brands such as Nikon and Bushnell also make excellent options.

Singita

Headgear
A lightweight canvas hat with a brim that covers the ears to protect you from the hot African sun, and that will stay on in a moving vehicle, is a very handy item indeed. Backcountry and Tilley both have an excellent selection of good quality safari hats in different styles.

Long-sleeved shirts
A light, durable, long-sleeved shirt will offer practical comfort by protecting you from the midday sun while keeping you warm on those cooler morning and evening game drives. Columbia makes a great range in a huge variety of colours and styles.

Singita

Other clothing
Summer in southern Africa begins in October and runs until April, during which time it is most comfortable to wear shorts and lightweight shirts and t-shirts. A light fleece or long-sleeved top may be required if the temperatures drop when the sun goes down. It remains relatively warm in winter (May to September), so you are unlikely to need more than a good sweater to keep out the chill. A raincoat is recommended at all times of the year, but especially during the wet season which is from March to early May and from late October to early January.

Cotton clothing in neutral colours is recommended for game drives and neutral colours are compulsory for all walking safaris. Keep whites and dark colours to a minimum, as these colours attract certain bugs. Formal attire is not required.

Sunscreen
A small range of sunscreen is available at each lodge, but in case your preferred variant is not available, we would recommend that you bring this with you. The sun in Africa is particularly fierce so a high, broad-spectrum SPF is strongly recommended.

Singita

Malaria prophylaxis
Since malaria is present in all the regions in which Singita lodges are situated, it is essential to ensure that anti-malarial precautions be taken. Yellow fever inoculations are also compulsory when visiting Tanzania. Please consult your doctor or pharmacist for further information.

Insect repellent
Mosquitos and tsetse flies can be a nuisance on safari so it is advisable to make use of a mild insect repellant while visiting our lodges. We stock a small selection of products for this use but also recommend Avon Skin-So-Soft Bug Guard as one of the most effective.

Singita

Reference books
While each lodge keeps a number of excellent bird books and informational titles on the local fauna and flora, any enthusiastic ornithologist or game-spotter will tell you that keeping a personal record of your sightings by ticking them off in your own book is essential! Roberts Birds of Southern Africa and the Sasol Guide to Birds of Southern & East Africa is a particularly good one for the twitchers among you. Other good reference material includes Dr. Richard Estes’ The Safari Companion, an excellent field guide to observing and understanding the behaviour of African mammals.

Singita

For further information, please contact our knowledgeable reservations team who will be happy to answer any of your questions.

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Ancient Art: Malilangwe’s primitive paintings

November 14, 2012 - Conservation,Did You Know?,History,Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve,Safari,Singita Pamushana Lodge

Singita Pamushana Lodge is located in the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve; 130 000 acres of wilderness in the southern corner of Zimbabwe. It is a spectacularly diverse and beautiful piece of Africa, and is also home to nearly 100 rock art sites that date back more than 2 000 years. The careful protection of these sites is a key part of Singita’s conservation philosophy, and allows this ancient artwork to be preserved for future generations to enjoy. Head Guide at Singita Pamushana, Brad Fouché, shares his knowledge on the subject.

The area around the lodge is known for its lush mopane forests and majestic baobab trees, as well as a range of magical sandstone outcrops where most of the San paintings are located.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve Rock Art 1

In Zimbabwe there are 15 000 known rock art and engraving sites, of which many are unique to the country, with little or no other examples found in the rest of Southern Africa. The three different groups of paintings found at the reserve are from San or Bushman hunter-gatherers, Iron Age farmers and Koi Koi/Khoekhoen people.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve Rock Art 2

In addition to professional research undertaken to locate Stone and Iron Age rock painting sites in the area, field staff and guides at Singita Pamushana have recorded a great many other examples. No less than five recording projects have been conducted on the reserve in the last decade, and a total of 87 sites being recorded, with surely many more as yet undiscovered.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve Rock Art 3

Some of the unique rock art that can be found here includes:

* Five extremely rare bi-cephalic (double-headed) animals, of which only two other examples have been discovered in Southern Africa.
* Fly whisks, which are relatively common in San rock art and were used only during the “curing” or “trance dance”.
* Two examples of formlings, a term coined by ethnologist and archaeologist Leo Frobenius to describe “large forms, shaped like galls or livers, into which human figures are painted”, and unique to the whole of Zimbabwe. Their meaning however remains poorly understood.
* Various animals, including elephant, rhino, hippo, buffalo, giraffe, hartebeest, wildebeest, zebra, roan antelope, sable, kudu, impala, wild dog, baboon, aardvark, ostrich and unidentified birds of prey.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve Rock Art 4

Find out more about the inspiration behind Singita Pamushana Lodge, one of Africa’s best-kept secrets, and read our latest Guides’ Diary from the area, written by field guide Jenny Hishin.

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Cooling off in the shade – what you didn’t know about the Fever tree

June 16, 2010 - Did You Know?,Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve

The Fever tree is completely harmless but they have the early pioneers to blame for their ominous sounding name.

Image courtesy of shortshot (http://www.flickr.com/photos/shortshot/354990089/)

The pioneers believed that Fever trees were the cause of malaria outbreaks. It was eventually proved that Fever trees had absolutely nothing to do with malaria. The only thing the wrongfully accused Fever trees share with the real malaria culprits, the female Anopheles mosquitoes, is a love of swampy areas.

Nevertheless the story goes that locals would lie down in the shade of the tree to escape the burning sun. Invariably, they would fall asleep and would wake up covered in mosquito bites which would often lead to the onset of malaria.

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